6

This seems to be similar to POD structs containing constant member, but sort of reversed.

#include <iostream>

struct A
{
    int a;
};

union U
{
    volatile A a;
    long b;
};

int main()
{
    U u1;
    U u2;

    u1.a.a = 12;
    u2 = u1;
    std::cout << u2.a.a << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

g++ 4.8.3 compiles this code without error and it runs correctly:

$ g++ -std=c++03 a.cpp -o a_gcc
$ ./a_gcc
12

But clang++ 3.5.1 produces an error (I have manually wrapped the error message to keep the code box from scrolling):

$ clang++ -std=c++03 a.cpp -o a_clang
a.cpp:8:7: error: member function 'operator=' not viable: 'this'
argument has type 'volatile A', but function is not marked volatile
union U
      ^
a.cpp:3:8: note: 'operator=' declared here
struct A
       ^
a.cpp:20:5: note: implicit copy assignment operator for 'U' first
required here
        u2 = u1;
        ^
1 error generated.

Does C++03 allow the program to copy-assign a union containing volatile structs? I could not find anything in the C++03 standard that defines the default copy constructor of a union.

I would like to know which compiler is correct or if the standard isn't clear on that point.

Edit: I found out that if I use copy construction instead of copy assignment that both clang++ and g++ will compile the program without error. Specifically if I change main to be:

int main()
{
    U u1;

    u1.a.a = 12;
    U u2 = u1;
    std::cout << u2.a.a << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

.. then it will work. I wonder why they are treated differently by clang++.

  • What if you add a user-defined assignment operator in union U: volatile U& operator =(const volatile U&) volatile? Or perhaps with only some of those volatiles? – John Zwinck Feb 5 '15 at 2:13
  • Why not make instances of the union volatile instead of having the union's members be volatile? It seems easier to reason about its behavior that way. – BlamKiwi Feb 5 '15 at 2:48
  • @JohnZwinck Because then it won't cause this problem. – qbt937 Feb 5 '15 at 6:42
0

In C++11, the union's copy constructor can be deleted. We see this from a note in [class.union], §9.5 in N4140:

[Note: If any non-static data member of a union has a non-trivial default constructor (12.1), copy constructor (12.8), move constructor (12.8), copy assignment operator (12.8), move assignment operator (12.8), or destructor (12.4), the corresponding member function of the union must be user-provided or it will be implicitly deleted (8.4.3) for the union. —end note ]

And in [class.copy], §12.8/25, we see that our union has a non-trivial copy constructor:

A copy/move assignment operator for class X is trivial if it is not user-provided, its parameter-type-list is equivalent to the parameter-type-list of an implicit declaration, and if ...
— [ .. ]
— class X has no non-static data members of volatile-qualified type, and

But that particular line in [class.copy] was only added a result of Is a volatile-qualified type really a POD? Before then, such a class would still be considered to have a trivial copy constructor.

So it's my understanding that in C++03, there is no indication that the union's copy constructor should be deleted, and in C++11, there is some indication of this but it is non-normative.

  • Note that the rule you quoted does not actually apply, since it is the union itself whose copy-assignment operator is non-trivial, but the rule talks about the operators for members... and the copy assignment operator for class A is trivial. – Ben Voigt Feb 5 '15 at 4:20
  • @BenVoigt Hm. Then I got nothing. – Barry Feb 5 '15 at 4:23
  • I think this is still valuable, but definitely non-normative. – Ben Voigt Feb 5 '15 at 4:23
  • @Barry Interesting reference to C++11. If I compile my test program in C++11 mode both g++ and clang++ will error that the copy assignment operator of U is implicitly deleted. – qbt937 Feb 5 '15 at 6:39
  • @Barry For C++11 I think the relevant quote is "a non-static data member of class type M (or array thereof) that cannot be copied/moved because overload resolution (13.3), as applied to M’s corresponding assignment operator, results in an ambiguity or a function that is deleted or inaccessible from the defaulted assignment operator, or ..." from 12.8/24. The default copy assignment operator of the member can't be used because the default copy assignment operator can't handle volatile (see 12.8/19 and it's footnote). But that is only for C++11, and I haven't been able to find anything for C++03 – qbt937 Feb 5 '15 at 7:04

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