5

How do I check if a given directory contains another directory in shell. I want to pass 2 full path directories. (I know this is stupid, but just for learning purposes). Then I want to see if any one of those 2 paths is contained in the other one.

parent=$1
child=$2

if [ -d $child ]; then
    echo "YES"
else
    echo "NO"
fi

this however makes no use of the parent directory. Only checks if the child exists.

2
  • You want to see if $parent is a parent of $child at some level? That's a string prefix check (assuming you aren't worried about symlinks, ../ games, etc.). Feb 5, 2015 at 3:10
  • Use find -type d -name "$child".
    – Barmar
    Feb 5, 2015 at 3:11

6 Answers 6

7

You can use find to see if one name is contained within another:

result=$(find "$parent" -type d -name "$child")
if [[ -n $result ]]
then echo YES
else echo NO
fi
1

Similar to Barmar's answer but far more reliable than name comparisons:

if find "$parent" -samefile "$child" -printf 'Y\n' -quit | grep -qF Y; then
    echo "contains '$child'"
fi

To be even safer, you can also follow symlinks to ensure that there's no way a recursive operation on $parent could damage $child or anything in it:

if find -L "$parent" -samefile "$child" -printf 'Y\n' -quit | grep -qF Y; then
    echo "contains '$child' or link thereto"
fi
0

Create a file (ex: dircontains.sh) with this code:

#!/bin/bash

function dircontains_syntax {
    local msg=$1
    echo "${msg}" >&2
    echo "syntax: dircontains <parent> <file>" >&2
    return 1
}

function dircontains {
    local result=1
    local parent=""
    local parent_pwd=""
    local child=""
    local child_dir=""
    local child_pwd=""
    local curdir="$(pwd)"
    local v_aux=""

    # parameters checking
    if [ $# -ne 2 ]; then
        dircontains_syntax "exactly 2 parameters required"
        return 2
    fi
    parent="${1}"
    child="${2}"

    # exchange to absolute path
    parent="$(readlink -f "${parent}")"
    child="$(readlink -f "${child}")"
    dir_child="${child}"

    # direcory checking
    if [ ! -d "${parent}" ];  then
        dircontains_syntax "parent dir ${parent} not a directory or doesn't exist"
        return 2
    elif [ ! -e "${child}" ];  then
        dircontains_syntax "file ${child} not found"
        return 2
    elif [ ! -d "${child}" ];  then
        dir_child=`dirname "${child}"`
    fi

    # get directories from $(pwd)
    cd "${parent}"
    parent_pwd="$(pwd)"
    cd "${curdir}"  # to avoid errors due relative paths
    cd "${dir_child}"
    child_pwd="$(pwd)"

    # checking if is parent
    [ "${child_pwd:0:${#parent_pwd}}" = "${parent_pwd}" ] && result=0

    # return to current directory
    cd "${curdir}"
    return $result
}    

Then run these commands

. dircontains.sh

dircontains path/to/dir/parent any/file/to/test

# the result is in $? var 
# $1=0, <file> is in <dir_parent>
# $1=1, <file> is not in <dir_parent>
# $1=2, error

Obs:
- Tested only in ubuntu 16.04/bash
- In this case, the second parameter can be any Linux file

0

Pure bash, no external commands used:

#!/bin/bash

parent=$1
child=$2
[[ $child && $parent ]] || exit 2 # both arguments must be present
child_dir="${child%/*}"           # get the dirname of child
if [[ $child_dir = $parent && -d $child ]]; then
  echo YES
else
  echo NO
fi
0

Works for sub-directories too:

parent=$1
child=$2

if [[ ${child/$parent/} != $child ]] ; then
    echo "YES"
else
    echo "NO"
fi
-1

You can accomplish this in pure bash. Loop over every file in $1 and see if "$1/$2" is a dir, like so:

parent=$1
child=$(basename $2)
if [ -d $parent ] && [ -d $child ]; then
    for child in $parent; do
        if [ -d "$parent/$child" ]; then
            echo "Yes"
        else
            echo "No"
        fi
    done
fi
2
  • 1
    The reason why this won't work is because in the second if stattement, you are appending the entire child path to the parent path. This results in a non-existent directory and it will always result in NO. Feb 5, 2015 at 3:25
  • 1
    @Kanny Bros, use child=$(basename $2) if you'd only like the folder name of $child instead of its absolute path.
    – MeetTitan
    Feb 5, 2015 at 3:27

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.