3

I have a segment similar to the following.

struct derive : base{
    derive(unique_ptr ptr): base{func(ptr->some_data), std::move(ptr)}{}
};

In theory, it should work. But since the compiler (vs2015) does not strictly follow the standard, the order of func(ptr->some_data), std::move(ptr) is undefined, i.e. ptr may be moved before accessed.

So my problem is how to make this segment work as expected?

Complete code like this:

#include <memory>

struct base {
    virtual ~base() = 0 {}

protected:
    base(std::unique_ptr<base> new_state) :
        previous_state{ std::move(new_state) } {}
private:
    std::unique_ptr<base> previous_state;
};

struct derive_base : base {
    int get_a() const noexcept {
        return a;
    }
protected:
    derive_base(int const new_a, std::unique_ptr<base> new_state) :
        base{ std::move(new_state) }, a{ new_a } {}
private:
    int a;
};

struct final_state : derive_base {
    final_state(std::unique_ptr<base> new_state) :
        derive_base{ dynamic_cast<derive_base&>(*new_state).get_a(), std::move(new_state) } {}
};
  • 3
    Did you have a question? – Ben Voigt Feb 5 '15 at 4:27
  • I saw one just a second ago... honest. the last edit wiped it. – WhozCraig Feb 5 '15 at 4:28
  • @WhozCraig Yes. My parenthesis stack got corrupted. – Drew Dormann Feb 5 '15 at 4:32
  • And what does the base constructor look like? Depending on that this call may already be safe. – Praetorian Feb 5 '15 at 4:32
  • 1
    @BenVoigt Now I'm confused (an SSCCE would avoid all of this!). I was thinking of the case where the base constructor in question is base(result_of_func_type, unique_ptr) as opposed to base(result_of_func_type, unique_ptr&&). If VS is non-compliant in order of evaluation the former is not safe but the latter is. – Praetorian Feb 5 '15 at 4:38
5

You can fix it using constructor chaining:

struct derive : base
{
  private:
    derive(const D& some_data, unique_ptr<X>&& ptr) : base{some_data, std::move(ptr)} {}
  public:
    derive(unique_ptr<X> ptr): derive(func(ptr->some_data), std::move(ptr)) {}
};

Reason: As explained in my other answer, the call to func definitely takes place before the delegated constructor call, while actually moving the unique_ptr (as opposed to merely changing its value category) definitely takes place inside.

Of course, this relies on another C++11 feature which Visual C++ may or may not have gotten right. Happily, delegating constructors are listed as supported since VS2013.


An even better thing to do is just always accept std::unique_ptr arguments by reference, and by rvalue reference if you plan to steal from them. (And if you won't steal the content, why do you care what type of smart pointer the caller has? Just accept a raw T*.)

If you used

struct base
{
    virtual ~base() = 0 {}

protected:
    base(std::unique_ptr<base>&& new_state) :
        previous_state{ std::move(new_state) } {}
private:
    std::unique_ptr<base> previous_state;
};

struct derive_base : base
{
    int get_a() const noexcept {
        return a;
    }
protected:
    derive_base(int const new_a, std::unique_ptr<base>&& new_state) :
        base{ std::move(new_state) }, a{ new_a } {}
private:
    int a;
};

struct final_state : derive_base
{
    final_state(std::unique_ptr<base>&& new_state) :
        derive_base{ dynamic_cast<derive_base&>(*new_state).get_a(), std::move(new_state) } {}
};

you wouldn't have had the problem in the first place, and the caller requirements are completely unchanged (an rvalue must be provided, since unique_ptr is uncopyable anyway)


The rationale for making this a universal rule is as follows: pass by value allows either copying or moving, whichever is more optimal at the call site. But std::unique_ptr is non-copyable, so the actual parameter MUST be an rvalue anyway.

  • It is a solution. I will accept this without better solutions. – cqdjyy01234 Feb 5 '15 at 4:51
  • With your new edit, I would wonder whether it is better to accept unique_ptr by rvalue reference in general? – cqdjyy01234 Feb 5 '15 at 4:55
  • @user1535111: Yes, if you plan to steal from them. Otherwise use const unique_ptr&. That's why I said "always". – Ben Voigt Feb 5 '15 at 4:55
  • 1
    You already got a +1 from me for the first half, but I disagree with the second. I'm of the opinion that you should take the unique_ptr by value if you plan on taking ownership, taking by rvalue ref leaves it ambigous whether you actually moved from it or not. See NicolBolas' excellent answer on this. – Praetorian Feb 5 '15 at 4:57
  • @Praetorian: This of course is the case that Nicol didn't address, and probably will change his answer. I left a comment there to bring it to his attention. – Ben Voigt Feb 5 '15 at 5:00
1

The order is indeed undefined, but that doesn't matter because std::move doesn't actually move from the pointer, it only changes the value category.

The call to func(ptr->some_data) will take place before the pointer is moved, because the first is argument evaluation and the latter happens inside the base constructor, and argument evaluation always is ordered before a function call.

If it makes you feel better, you can write it as the 100% equivalent:

derive(unique_ptr<X> ptr): base{func(ptr->some_data), (unique_ptr<X>&&)ptr}{}

Edit: the actual move doesn't take place inside the called function, if the parameter is pass by-value. But who does such a thing with unique_ptrs?

  • @AMostMajestuousCapybara: It's not supposed to be pretty. Just clear. The elegant way is to keep using std::move – Ben Voigt Feb 5 '15 at 4:37
  • In fact, move takes place in first in my case. – cqdjyy01234 Feb 5 '15 at 4:38
  • @user1535111: The call to std::move, which is non-destructive? Or the call to the move-constructor of unique_ptr? The two are very different things. – Ben Voigt Feb 5 '15 at 4:39
  • @BenVoigt I mean the variable (e.g. m_ptr) that accepts std::move(ptr) is declared in the base of base, i.e. m_ptr is declared before m_other_data. – cqdjyy01234 Feb 5 '15 at 4:42
  • 1
    @user1535111 Can you please post these details in the question? And preferably make it compilable. – Praetorian Feb 5 '15 at 4:43

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