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The problem I am facing at the moment is little delicate as I am using Background Worker in C sharp to get connected with website 24/7 days. The main problem is that the data provider (website) occasionally drops its connection and my Background workers just stay their idle doing nothing. As soon as the connection from website drops, I need to re-establish its connection again. This seems difficult at the moment.

I was thinking to create a infinite loop to check HttpWebResponse in a separate thread. However, this make things even more complicated as passing variable from one thread to the other does not simplify this problem.

What I am looking for is some native solution using Background Worker class. One thing I have in mind is that I could check HttpWebResponse to know when to reconnect. Something like this to be placed inside BackgroundWorker_DoWork function:

if (Response.StatusCode != System.Net.HttpStatusCode.OK)
{
   //reconnect
}

However, I am very new to Background Worker class and I could not find the location of the infinite loop inside background worker code.

I assume "do while" loop inside BackgroundWorker_DoWork function might be one place but when I print something like this inside the code, it does not print anything on my console window.

Console.WriteLine("Connection Lost. Current Status Code " + Response.StatusCode);

If you could share some of your wisdom on this problem, it will be really appreciated. :)

private static void BackgroundWorker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {

        HttpWebRequest Request;

        if (m_nAccountTYpe == -1)
        {
            Request = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create  (XMLObjects.POST_STREAM_DEMO_URI);
        }
        else
        {
            Request = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(XMLObjects.POST_STREAM_URI);
        }

        Request.Method = "POST";
        byte[] requestedBytes = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(XMLRequests.BuildPushStreamXML());


        Stream RequestStream = Request.GetRequestStream();
        RequestStream.Write(requestedBytes, 0, requestedBytes.Length);
        RequestStream.Close();


        try
        {
            // Create HTTP Response object
            Response = (HttpWebResponse)Request.GetResponse();
            Stream ResponseStream = Response.GetResponseStream();

            XmlReaderSettings settings = new XmlReaderSettings();
            settings.ConformanceLevel = ConformanceLevel.Fragment;

            XmlReader reader = XmlReader.Create(ResponseStream, settings);


            do
            {

                if (e.Cancel)
                {  
                    return;
                }

                if (!reader.EOF)
                {
                    ExtractDataFromStream(reader);
                }
                else
                {
                    throw new Exception("EOF");
                }


            } while (bwStreamData.IsBusy);


        }
        catch (Exception f)
        {

        }
        finally
        {
            Response.Close();
            RequestStream.Close();
            bwStreamData.CancelAsync();
        }
    }
  • Please try not to include redundant tags in the title of your questions. I've edited your post to remove the tag from the title and also took the liberty to remove the greetings and thanks phrases, as they are not recommended on SO. The greetings in particular is very bad since when people look at your question in the home page they will see the first paragraph or so, and you would be wasting that space with things that are not related to the question at all. – julealgon Feb 5 '15 at 15:08
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I am going to try and provide a solution by not modifying too much of your original code. I think that as you get familiar with using BWs you will find better ways (including logic) of doing things. So I am going to try and address your main concern.

First off, you are correct, BackgroundWorkers do have "design" paradigms you should stick by that can keep you thread-safe.

Firstly, the logic of BW is simple on the surface.

1.) DoWork, this is the meat/potato of the BackgroundWorker. This is a good place to ensure all your variables are read or saved, functions executed etc.

2.) ReportProgress, a function fired ASYNCHRONOUSLY at the end of one BackgroundWorker DoWork iteration. More on this in a moment.

3.) WorkCompleted, the finality of a BackgroundWorker and executes functions on the close of a BW operation.

Now the usual "problem" comes with executing UI or main thread code in the middle of a DoWork. Debug/Console WriteLine commands here usually crash or do not execute at all. However, having a ReportProgress event allows you to send a UI update while the BackgroundWorker is still running. This maybe the part of the code you need to modify to get your command to display.

    BW.WorkerReportsProgress = true;
    BW.WorkerSupportsCancellation = true;
    BW.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(BW_DoWork);
    BW.ProgressChanged += new ProgressChangedEventHandler(BW_ProgressChanged);
    BW.RunWorkerCompleted += new RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler(BW_WorkCompleted);

    private void BW_ProgressChanged(object sender, ProgressChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Connection Lost. Current Status Code " + Response.StatusCode);
    }

Now that your background worker is properly configured, one has to be very careful to avoid cross-threading. I would recommend executing a Try/Catch to handle the instance of cross-threading access to a variable for an example (avoiding it whenever possible). It does happen, if somewhat infrequently if careful. Alternatively you can use the concept of an Invoke command. The design style though, I leave up to you.

        do
        {

        if (e.Cancel)
        {  
           return;
        }
        if (!reader.EOF)
        {
           ExtractDataFromStream(reader);
        }
        else
        {
            throw new Exception("EOF");
        }

        MONITOR.ReportProgress(0);

     } while (bwStreamData.IsBusy);

Report progress was initially designed to send an integer "percentage" of work completed, however, using the infinite loop concept you may use the ReportProgress for communicating to the user/programmer other useful bits of information.

One thing to note, as I recently learned, ReportProgress is NON-SEQUENTIAL. Meaning it begins executing the second called but BackgroundWorker does not pause to wait for it complete!

Suggesting the logic of what you may want to include in your BackgroundWorker:

CONTINUE = true;

while((CONTINUE)&&(!(reader.EOF)))
{
   if(StillConnected())
   {
      try
      {
          ExtractDataFromStream(reader);
      }
      catch (Exception ex)
      {
          CONTINUE = False;

          //Because we are on a separate thread, we can't update
          //the UI directly.  So we save the error message to a
          //global variable (string.)
          strErrorMessage = "Exception: " + ex.Message +
                            "\n\nStackTrace: " + ex.StackTrace;
      }
   }
   else
   {
      //To prevent infinite stuck loops, i.e. website goes down
      //try a counter
      if (RECONNECTCOUNT <= 1000)
      {
          Reconnect();
          RECONNECTCOUNT++;
      }
      else
      {
          CONTINUE = false;
          RECONNECTCOUNT = 0;
      }
   }

   //ProgressChanged Event can be used for reading data, saving data,
   //updating the UI, etc.
   BW.ReportProgress(0);
}

For good measure, whenever I cancel my Asynchronous Status Updater, I remember to call BW.CancelAsync(); as well as set global variable CONTINUE = false;

  • Thanks for your answer. I am studying your answer now. Ha ha. – auto9817 Feb 5 '15 at 15:18
  • Be sure to refresh, I update often, and I finally got my cup of coffee :D – HouseCat Feb 5 '15 at 15:21
  • Firstly this is great answer. Thanks so much. – auto9817 Feb 5 '15 at 15:40
  • Just found Report Progress is not working as it should be. I placed the details on Answer 2. Kind regards. :) :) – auto9817 Feb 5 '15 at 15:57
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This is solution for RagingCain to replace my do while loop in my original code block. Thanks for your kind answer, RagingCain. Note that I use the rest of original code including Response variable.

            bool mContinue = true;
            int mReconnectCount = 0;

            while ((mContinue) && (!(reader.EOF)))
            {
                if (Response.StatusCode == System.Net.HttpStatusCode.OK)
                {
                    try
                    {
                        ExtractDataFromStream(reader);
                    }
                    catch (Exception ex)
                    {
                        mContinue = false;

                        //Because we are on a separate thread, we can't update
                        //the UI directly.  So we save the error message to a
                        //global variable (string.)
                        string strErrorMessage = "Exception: " + ex.Message + "\n\nStackTrace: " + ex.StackTrace;
                        Console.WriteLine(strErrorMessage);

                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    //To prevent infinite stuck loops, i.e. website goes down
                    //try a counter
                    if (mReconnectCount <= 1000)
                    {
                        TryToReconnect();

                        mReconnectCount++;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        mContinue = false;
                        mReconnectCount = 0;
                    }
                }

                //ProgressChanged Event can be used for reading data, saving data, etc.
                BW.ReportProgress(0);
            }

However I still don't get the Report Progress, even though I have place this code lines below and passes all the debugging. I think I suppose to get this "Current Connection Status OK" message iteratively as the console application is running. But I don't get the message from Report Progress. Any idea will be really appreciated. :)

        BW = new System.ComponentModel.BackgroundWorker();

        BW.WorkerReportsProgress = true;
        BW.WorkerSupportsCancellation = true;


        BW.DoWork += new System.ComponentModel.DoWorkEventHandler(BW_DoWork);
        BW.ProgressChanged += new ProgressChangedEventHandler(BW_ProgressChanged);
        BW.RunWorkerCompleted += new System.ComponentModel.RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler(BW_RunWorkerCompleted);



    private static void BW_ProgressChanged(object sender, ProgressChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Current Connection Status " + Response.StatusCode);
    }
  • This can occur if the BackgroundWorker isn't properly initialized. I noticed you are missing "System.ComponentModel" from the ProgressChangedEventHandler above, is that the same in your code? Also, depending on which Visual Studio version you are using, I have had a bug occur where output windows weren't being used for Console or Debug, after I configured "x86 or x64". Switching back to AnyCPU fixed it for whatever reason. My work around was using: MessageBox.Show("Message"); This lets you know if the code is actually being called. Furthermore try using break points. – HouseCat Feb 5 '15 at 16:00
  • I was indeed missing "System.ComponentModel" from the ProgressChangedEventHandler. After I added "System.ComponentModel", the Report Progress does not print anything on my console window. :):) – auto9817 Feb 5 '15 at 16:04
  • I see. I guess there are some thread issues. I guess. Let me try to use Message Box or even writing output to text file. – auto9817 Feb 5 '15 at 16:06
  • Well, I see a problem, the Console.WriteLine call can't be made directly inside the DoWork function. You would call that in RunWorkerCompleted after the backgroundworker erred out. – HouseCat Feb 5 '15 at 16:29

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