116

I'm looking for a method for JavaScript that returns true or false when it's empty... something like Ruby any? or empty?

[].any? #=> false
[].empty? #=> true
0

11 Answers 11

140

The JavaScript native .some() method does exactly what you're looking for:

function isBiggerThan10(element, index, array) {
  return element > 10;
}

[2, 5, 8, 1, 4].some(isBiggerThan10);  // false
[12, 5, 8, 1, 4].some(isBiggerThan10); // true
16
  • 1
    Thank you, I see now [12,5,8,1,4].some(function(e){ return e > 10;}); working!
    – kangkyu
    Jan 5 '16 at 10:01
  • 4
    @kangkyu I think it's time to accept this answer ;)
    – asiniy
    Aug 5 '16 at 13:23
  • 4
    Sorry for late response, but @asiniy I still think the accepted answer should have been accepted because it has more details (including some()) and can be more helpful to others.
    – kangkyu
    Nov 3 '16 at 17:36
  • 9
    @kangkyu Except the currently accepted answer spends more time trying to be Ruby-ish than actually giving a javascript answer. It also recommends writing your own wrapper (which really isn't necessary) and does so in a potentially harmful way (i.e. extending the prototype for something that isn't a polyfill)
    – Jasper
    Oct 12 '18 at 8:33
  • 2
    @LokiKriasus Extending the prototype may cause future problems (i.e. if in the future javascript defines a any() method, and someone uses it, that code may fail in weird ways when used together with a library that uses this code because you defined it slightly differently) and creates code that is harder to read for other (javascript) developers. And the whole reason for that approach is that a Ruby developer refused to learn that they should write some() instead of any() and that they shouldn't forget to pass a function to it even if the array is empty...
    – Jasper
    Aug 5 '19 at 8:06
78

JavaScript has the Array.prototype.some() method:

[1, 2, 3].some((num) => num % 2 === 0);  

returns true because there's (at least) one even number in the array.

In general, the Array class in JavaScript's standard library is quite poor compared to Ruby's Enumerable. There's no isEmpty method and .some() requires that you pass in a function or you'll get an undefined is not a function error. You can define your own .isEmpty() as well as a .any() that is closer to Ruby's like this:

Array.prototype.isEmpty = function() {
    return this.length === 0;
}

Array.prototype.any = function(func) {
   return this.some(func || function(x) { return x });
}

Libraries like underscore.js and lodash provide helper methods like these, if you're used to Ruby's collection methods, it might make sense to include them in your project.

0
30

I'm a little late to the party, but...

[].some(x => !!x)
6
  • 4
    I guess this doesn't play well with [false, 0, '', null, undefined] Sep 25 '19 at 10:31
  • It works wonderfully, @BrookJordan. It returns false. The zero in there is questionable, but for the rest, I believe that is the functionality OP was after. Looking for "truthy" entities.
    – Dudo
    Apr 18 '20 at 20:55
  • Ah ok, I think I misunderstood empty. When I read empty I think of [,,,]. I guess the !! isn’t even required really then. Apr 20 '20 at 13:03
  • 2
    another, arguably more beautiful way of writing this: [].some(x => Boolean)
    – phil294
    Aug 12 '20 at 13:00
  • 6
    @phil294 it should be [].some(Boolean) Sep 22 '20 at 18:40
9
var a = [];
a.length > 0

I would just check the length. You could potentially wrap it in a helper method if you like.

2
9

JavaScript arrays can be "empty", in a sense, even if the length of the array is non-zero. For example:

var empty = new Array(10);
var howMany = empty.reduce(function(count, e) { return count + 1; }, 0);

The variable "howMany" will be set to 0, even though the array was initialized to have a length of 10.

Thus because many of the Array iteration functions only pay attention to elements of the array that have actually been assigned values, you can use something like this call to .some() to see if an array has anything actually in it:

var hasSome = empty.some(function(e) { return true; });

The callback passed to .some() will return true whenever it's called, so if the iteration mechanism finds an element of the array that's worthy of inspection, the result will be true.

8

I believe this to be the cleanest and readable option:

var empty = [];
empty.some(x => x); //returns false
4
  • 2
    What if empty contains falsy values?
    – Tom Hale
    Nov 9 '20 at 6:01
  • 1
    empty.some(x => true) would work on [undefined, null, false, 0] Jul 23 '21 at 17:31
  • @TomHale [false, 0, "", undefined, null, NaN].some(x => x) returns false Nov 20 '21 at 14:04
  • If you want to consider those values as valid, use as Holden said: empty.some(x => true) Nov 20 '21 at 14:33
4

If you really want to got nuts, add a new method to the prototype:

if (!('empty' in Array.prototype)) {
  Array.prototype.empty = function () {
    return this.length === 0;
  };
}

[1, 2].empty() // false
[].empty() // true

DEMO

4
  • Thank you for help. I found here for Array.compact (I live in Ruby area) and they say !!(anything truthy) returns true, so it could be something like !!array.filter(function(e){ return e }).length ?
    – kangkyu
    Feb 7 '15 at 1:34
  • if (!('any?' in Array.prototype)) { Array.prototype.any? = function () {return !!this.filter(function(e){ return e }).length;};} .... I tried this didn't work urgh
    – kangkyu
    Feb 7 '15 at 1:48
  • Why don't you use georg's? Also, I don't think you can have question marks in method names.
    – Andy
    Feb 7 '15 at 2:23
  • 1
    if (!('any' in Array.prototype)) { Array.prototype.any = function () {return !!this.filter(function(e){ return e }).length;};} this works as Array.any() Thank you Andy
    – kangkyu
    Feb 7 '15 at 23:14
3

Just use Array.length:

var arr = [];

if (arr.length)
   console.log('not empty');
else
   console.log('empty');

See MDN

3

What you want is .empty not .empty() to fully mimics Ruby :

     Object.defineProperty( Array.prototype, 'empty', {
           get: function ( ) { return this.length===0 }
      } );    

then

[].empty //true
[3,2,8].empty //false

For any , see my answer here

2

Array has a length property :

[].length // 0
[0].length // 1
[4, 8, 15, 16, 23, 42].length // 6
2

polyfill* :

Array.prototype.any=function(){
    return (this.some)?this.some(...arguments):this.filter(...arguments).reduce((a,b)=> a || b)
};

If you want to call it as Ruby , that it means .any not .any(), use :

Object.defineProperty( Array.prototype, 'any', {
  get: function ( ) { return (this.some)?this.some(function(e){return e}):this.filter(function(e){return e}).reduce((a,b)=> a || b) }
} ); 

__

`* : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyfill

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