42

(overheard at the office, and we thought others will benefit)

Suppose I have a base class in a library, which provides some basic features, but which is intended to be derived from by the library user.

For example, I have an abstract Greeting class. Subclasses represent specific types of greetings, like HighFiveGreeting or HugGreeting or whatever. Greeting provides some utility functions for subclasses, like sendGreeting(). I don't want users of these classes to call sendGreeting().

Is that possible? Is there a better idiom in Dart for this kind of thing?

library greeting;

abstract class Greeting {
   void sendGreeting(GreetingEvent event) { ... }
}

library custom_greeting;
import 'greeting.dart';

class HugGreeting extends Greeting {
   // code here uses sendGreeting()
}

library main;
import 'custom_greeting.dart';

var hug = new HugGreeting();
hug.sendGreeting(...); // should not compile

4
37

Like stated here, now there is the @protected annotation in the meta package

I would love to know the reasons why to omit the public|private|protected keywords from the language BTW... :'(

6
  • 5
    The public|private keywords are omitted because all members are public unless they begin with an underscore, in which case they are private, which I happen to like. I agree with you about wanting a protected keyword rather than annotation though. Oct 23 '19 at 16:27
  • 3
    @MichaelP. Bad design: I came here to know if @protected works on _method or only on method. This doubt wouldn't exist if they just gave us private, public and protected. BTW, other languages, like C#, for instance, considers not using an access modifier as public.
    – JCKödel
    Mar 25 '20 at 0:12
  • 2
    There's a good reason to use naming conventions to denote private/public. What happens if you try to call a private method on a dynamic? The language only knows the type of a dynamic at run time, so calling a private method has to be a runtime error. The way they have it set up, foo._bar is always a syntax error. It's a way of static access checking, and it's a feature with pros and cons, not a defect. Mar 27 '20 at 18:19
  • 3
    They could have just introduced a new prefix that indicates the protected modifier instead of introducing the @protected attribute.
    – br3nt
    Apr 2 '20 at 3:18
  • 2
    Read github.com/dart-lang/sdk/issues/33383 for a long discussion on to have or not to have access modifiers in dart :) Personally, I am still getting used to underscores. I feel that it makes the code a little harder to read, given the Java background. Apr 22 '21 at 10:09
10

I believe there's no way to do this, but FWIW, this seems like a situation where composition would be preferable to inheritance:

class GreetingSender {
    void sendGreeting(GreetingEvent);
}

class HugGreeting {
    GreetingSender _sender;
    HugGreeting(this._sender);

    void hug() {
        // use _sender.sendGreeting()
    }
}

Every design which involves calling a protected method implemented in a superclass has a corresponding design where the superclass is replaced by an interface injected through the constructor, and I've yet to encounter a scenario where that doesn't improve things.

4
  • 1
    (I've met very few application-code scenarios in which implementation polymorphism - e.g. subtyping for LSP - improved things ;-) Feb 5 '15 at 18:02
  • It seems to me that requiring predictable constructor arguments is frustrating. I think, perhaps, you can use GreetingSender _sender = GreetingSender(); and forgo the need for declaring a constructor. Still, having a protected member as a part of the superclass is pretty convenient sometimes, like when there are many variables you'd like to make sure are included (otherwise you have a lot of biolerplate code to do whenever you create a new class that includes all of the members of a class format).
    – JVE999
    Feb 14 '20 at 19:26
  • So what exactly has been improved in your example? And how are you going to implement polymorphism without inheritance and protected methods?
    – doc
    Aug 22 '21 at 0:01
  • "composition preferable to inheritance" - people who make such statements do not understand the purpose of any.
    – doc
    Aug 22 '21 at 0:04
6

I had the same problem, but someone suggested the following solution, which works for me. I will demonstrate with a short example:

library view;

abstract class View {
  factory View({HtmlElement host}) = ViewImpl;

  void enable() {}
}

class ViewImpl implements View {
  HtmlElement host;

  ViewImpl({this.host});

  @override
  void enable() {
    host.classes.remove('disabled');
  }
}

In another library:

library button; // notice, this is another library

abstract class Button extends View {
  factory Button({String title, HtmlElement host}) = ButtonImpl; // The magic happens here!
}

class ButtonImpl extends ViewImpl implements Button {
  String title; // voila, a protected property

  ButtonImpl({this.title, HtmlElement host}) : super(host: host);
}

You can use it like this:

final button = new Button(title: "Cancel", host: element);

button.title // => cannot access!

Moreover, you can access the protected field in e.g. a unit test:

// Instantiate the *Impl class to side-step the protection.
final button = new ButtonImpl(title: "Cancel", host: element);
expect(button.title, equals("Cancel"); // => it works!

In short, you hide your 'protected' methods in Impl classes. You can freely extend the implementation in different libraries.

Hope this helps.

3
  • I am not able to understand the above solution. Especially the code in button library. What magic is happening in the Button factory constructor? Anybody care to explain a bit?
    – Braj
    Dec 17 '19 at 11:41
  • Where did the enable method being overridden come from? This is hard to follow
    – West
    Jul 7 '20 at 15:13
1

You could do something similar by taking advantage of the library as the boundary of privacy, like so:

library greetings;

abstract class Greeting {
   void _sendGreeting(String greeting) => print(greeting);
}

class HugGreeting extends Greeting {
  void sendHug() => _sendGreeting("Hug");
}

And in your main file:

import 'greetings.dart';

HugGreeting hug = new HugGreeting();
hug.sendHug();

That way, only classes that extend from Greeting and reside in the same library can access the low-level _sendGreeting() method.

1
  • 2
    Sometime you cannot have the same lib, or you don't want to. I also miss (java) protected keyword. Feb 6 '15 at 8:14
1

This limits the callers to subclasses and everything which has access to private members of these subclasses.

** library greeting

class GreetingEvent {
  final message;
  GreetingEvent(this.message);
  toString() => message;
}

abstract class Greeting {
  // The sub class has to pass a method to the super constructor
  // which allows to set a private field in the sub class.
  Greeting(Function setProtected) {
    // passes "this" so the passed static method has an instance
    // context
    setProtected(this, new GreetingProtected(this));
  }

  // protected
  void _sendGreeting(GreetingEvent event) {
    print(event);
  }
}

// This class provides access to protected members of Greeting
// by just forwarding calls
class GreetingProtected {
  // protected
  final _greeting;
  GreetingProtected(this._greeting);

  void sendGreeting(GreetingEvent event) => _greeting._sendGreeting(event);
}

** library custom_greeting

library custom_greeting;

import 'greeting.dart';

class HugGreeting extends Greeting {
  // the reference to the 
  GreetingProtected _protected;
  // pass the method to the super constructor which can 
  // assign the protected-forwarder
  HugGreeting() : super(_setProtected);

  // Method passed to the super constructor to pass
  // the protected-forwarder
  // Has to be static so it can be passed in the constructors
  // super call.
  static _setProtected(HugGreeting greeting, GreetingProtected protected) =>
      greeting._protected = protected;

  void someMethod() {
    // code here uses sendGreeting()
    _protected.sendGreeting(new GreetingEvent('someMethod'));
  }
}

** main

library main;
import 'custom_greeting.dart';
import 'greeting.dart';

void main() {
  var hug = new HugGreeting();
  //hug.sendGreeting(new GreetingEvent('someMessage'));
  // should not compile => and doesn't
  hug.someMethod();
}
-4

Why don't you use the almost standard prefix _ to mark function as private or protected?

I don't think you should completely block access to a private or protected function. Sure, let the user know that's access isn't wanted, but you shouldn't block it. Just today, I found a bug in dart-sdk. I could have override the faulty function and still use the rest of the class, but the class was marked as private... I needed to copy the class back inside my application... but I have been lucky here because it was not depending on anything else, but I remember doing something similar in c# for listview which I ended up recreating the complete library with hundred of private class just to make a small change.

library greeting;

abstract class Greeting {
   void _sendGreeting(GreetingEvent event) { ... }
}
library custom_greeting;
import 'greeting.dart';

class HugGreeting extends Greeting {
   // code here uses _sendGreeting()
}
library main;
import 'custom_greeting.dart';

var hug = new HugGreeting();
hug._sendGreeting(...); // should compile, maybe with a warning...
1
  • 3
    This ` // code here uses _sendGreeting()` fails because the method _sendGreeting in the base class is private and the base class is in another library. Feb 6 '15 at 8:29

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