24

Very similar question as these, except not exactly: What is the order in which the destructors and the constructors are called in C++ Order of member constructor and destructor calls

I want to know: are the member variables of the derived class destroyed before or after the destructor of the base class is called?

This is in C++ using Visual Studio 2008. Thanks.

4
  • The members are destroyed after the destructor is run (since the destructor is allowed to access them, and most of the time does in order to free resources, etc.)
    – Cameron
    Feb 5, 2015 at 23:34
  • 3
    Worth noting that destructors always run in the opposite order as constructors, even when the latter is unspecified (e.g. global objects). So you only have to remember one or the other. At least, I believe this is true and would be interested to see a counter-example...
    – Nemo
    Feb 6, 2015 at 0:04
  • 2
    @Nemo: There is one case which doesn't fit (and only one): Unloading a dynamically loaded shared object (.so / .dll / ...). Still, that's outside the purview of the standard. Feb 6, 2015 at 0:07
  • @Deduplicator: Thanks. Only "sort-of" counts as an exception, IMO, but worth knowing.
    – Nemo
    Feb 6, 2015 at 0:12

2 Answers 2

35

constructor: first base, then derived

destruction:

  • ~derived
  • ~member derived
  • ~base
  • ~member base

code:

class member {
    string s;

public:
    member(string s) {
        this-> s = s;
    }

    ~member() {
        cout << "~member " << s << endl;
    }
};

class base {
    member m;
public:
    base() : m("base"){
    }

    ~base() {
        cout << "~base" << endl;
    }
};

class derived : base{
     member m2;
public:

    derived() :m2("derived") {    }

    ~derived() {
        cout << "~derived" << endl;
    }
};

int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    derived s;

    return 0;
}

References & virtual destructor

When you plan to dynamically allocate (i.e. when you use the keywords new & delete) a derived object, then always have a virtual or a protected destructor on your base. Dynamically deleting the object on the base class reference would otherwise lead to memory leaks in the example below:

class base {
    member m;
public:
    base() : m("base"){
    }

    /* correct behaviour is when you add **virtual** in front of the signature */
    ~base() {
        cout << "~base" << endl;
    }
};

class derived : public base{
     member m2;
    char* longArray;
public:

    derived() :m2("derived") {
        longArray = new char[1000];
    }


    ~derived() {
        delete[] longArray; // never called
        cout << "~derived" << endl;
    }
};

int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    base *s = new derived; // mind the downcast to **base**

    delete s; /* only the non-virtual destructor on the base and its members is called. 
               No destructor on derived or its members is called.
               What happens to the memory allocated by derived?
               **longArray** is leaked forever. 
               Even without **longArray**, it most probably **leaks** memory, as C++ doesn't define its behaviour 
               */
    return 0;
}

Output:

  • ~base
  • ~member base

Only base data is cleaned up, and longArray leaks.

2
  • 1
    You might want to add virtuals into the picture. As-is, your overview is simply wrong. Feb 5, 2015 at 23:46
  • 1
    Well, you need to add virtual bases, and study up on the order. Feb 6, 2015 at 0:03
12

Here's what the standard says... (C++11, 12.4/8)

After executing the body of the destructor and destroying any automatic objects allocated within the body, a destructor for class X calls the destructors for X’s direct non-variant non-static data members, the destructors for X’s direct base classes and, if X is the type of the most derived class (12.6.2), its destructor calls the destructors for X’s virtual base classes. All destructors are called as if they were referenced with a qualified name, that is, ignoring any possible virtual overriding destructors in more derived classes. Bases and members are destroyed in the reverse order of the completion of their constructor (see 12.6.2). A return statement (6.6.3) in a destructor might not directly return to the caller; before transferring control to the caller, the destructors for the members and bases are called. Destructors for elements of an array are called in reverse order of their construction (see 12.6).

Note that this order is indeed the reverse of the order given in 12.6.2/10 in C++11. You can't tell what the order of destruction of virtual bases is from looking at 12.4/8 alone, but you can infer it from 12.6.2/10, which specifies that initialization of virtual bases occurs in depth-first search left-to-right order. (Thus, destruction of virtual bases occurs in the reverse of that order.)

Anyway, you have your answer. Non-static members are destroyed first, then base classes. But a base class's members will be destroyed before the next base class's destructor starts. It really is exactly like depth-first search.

9
  • Doesn't your quote say non-static members are destroyed before base classes?
    – Nemo
    Feb 6, 2015 at 0:02
  • @Nemo my bad, mistyped
    – Brian Bi
    Feb 6, 2015 at 0:03
  • 2
    I am pretty sure destructors run in the opposite order as constructors, always.
    – Nemo
    Feb 6, 2015 at 0:04
  • @Nemo I'm pretty sure that's the case for the relative order of subobjects of classes, anyway. I'm not entirely sure whether it's true in general.
    – Brian Bi
    Feb 6, 2015 at 0:07
  • 2
    @AbhishekMane correct. Static members are destroyed when the program terminates normally.
    – Brian Bi
    May 13, 2021 at 21:10

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