I'm making a simple ADT that has a method (Add3) that adds 3 to a given int. The code is shown below:

public class TestADT 
{
    private final int x;

    public TestADT (int x)
    {
        this.x = x;
    }

    public static TestADT Add3(TestADT num)
    {
        int ex = (num.x + 3);
        return (new TestADT(ex));
    }

    public String toString()
    {
        return(x + "");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        TestADT test = new TestADT(2);
        System.out.println(Add3(test));
    }
}

What I'm trying to do is create a JUnit test to check that the Add3 method is working correctly and so far I have this:

import static org.junit.Assert.*;

import org.junit.After;
import org.junit.Before;
import org.junit.Test;

public class Add3Test 
{
    private TestADT test;
    private TestADT expected;

    @Before
    public void setUp() throws Exception 
    {
        test = new TestADT(2);
        expected = new TestADT(5);
    }

    @Test
    public void test() 
    {
        TestADT result = TestADT.Add3(test);
        assertEquals(expected, result);
    }
}

When I run the testing class it fails but I'm unsure why. If I print both values (expected & result) before running the test they both print 5.

I'm relatively new to JUnit and ADT's so I'm not quite sure if I'm doing any of this right. I'm going to try and find some tutorial videos on JUnit and see if I can figure out a solution. Any help would be appreciated!

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You have not overridden equals and hashcode in your TestADT. By default, equals is done by reference. That means it's checking if the first is the same instance as the second.

You need to override equals and hashcode and have them compare by their x to check for equality:

public class TestADT
{
    private final int x;

    public TestADT(int x)
    {
        this.x = x;
    }

    public static TestADT Add3(TestADT num)
    {
        int ex = (num.x + 3);
        return (new TestADT(ex));
    }

    public String toString()
    {
        return(x + "");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        TestADT test = new TestADT(2);
        System.out.println(Add3(test));
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object o) {
        if (this == o) return true;
        if (o == null || getClass() != o.getClass()) return false;

        TestADT testADT = (TestADT) o;

        if (x != testADT.x) return false;

        return true;
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        return x;
    }
}

In my opinion, this is a much better solution than @azbarcea's. You'll need to implement these methods if you want to put your TestADT into a Set or a Map and expect it to work correctly.

  • Would you be able to explain what you mean by overriding equals and hashcode? – Paul Warnick Feb 6 '15 at 0:21
  • @PaulWarnick see my edit – Daniel Kaplan Feb 6 '15 at 0:43
  • 1
    Thank you very much, originally I intended to use @azbarcea's method, but upon a bit of review and a lot more testing I understand your solution and see how it works with one exception, what does the hashCode method do? – Paul Warnick Feb 6 '15 at 1:38
  • @PaulWarnick it does something that's very computer science-y. I'll have to write a blog article for you to explain it. – Daniel Kaplan Feb 6 '15 at 3:29
  • 1
    Thank you! I just happened to be looking into hashcode right now so the timing's perfect. – Paul Warnick Feb 10 '15 at 5:37

The fastest way to fix your code is to use:

@Test
public void test() 
{
    TestADT result = TestADT.add3(test);
    assertEquals(expected.toString(), result.toString());
}

Best practice is to use lower case for method names: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/methods.html

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