0

So I am writing a utility to query an API at work, and they throttle to 20 calls every 10 seconds. Easy, I'll just throttle my calls to at least .5 seconds passed since last call. My Throttle utility worked fine until I tried to use goroutines.

Right now I am using a struct/method combo:

func (c *CTKAPI) Throttle() {
if c.Debug{fmt.Println("\t\t\tEntering Throttle()")}
for { //in case something else makes a call while we're sleeping, we need to re-check
    if t := time.Now().Sub(c.LastCallTime); t < c.ThrottleTime {
        if c.Debug{fmt.Printf("\t\t\tThrottle: Sleeping %v\n", c.ThrottleTime - t)}
        time.Sleep(c.ThrottleTime - t)
    } else {
        if c.Debug{fmt.Println("\t\t\tThrottle: Released.")}
        break
    }
}
c.LastCallTime = time.Now()
if c.Debug{fmt.Println("\t\t\tExiting Throttle()")}

}

And then I call whatever.Throttle() before each call in each goroutine to make sure i've waited at least a half second before launching my next call.

But that seems to be unreliable and gives unpredictable results. Is there a more elegant way of throttling concurrent requests?

-Mike

1

Because you're introducing a data race, multiple routines are accessing / changing c.LastCallTime.

You use time.Tick instead or make c.LastCallTime an int64 (c.LastCallTime = time.Now().Unix()) and use atomic.LoadInt64/StoreInt64 to check it.

1

There is actually a much easier way to do this: create a time ticker.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "sync"
    "time"
)

func main() {
    rateLimit := time.Tick(500 * time.Millisecond)
    <-rateLimit

    var wg sync.WaitGroup
    for i := 0; i < 10; i++ {
        wg.Add(1)
        go func(i int) {
            <-rateLimit
            fmt.Println("Hello", i)
            wg.Done()
        }(i)
    }
    wg.Wait()
}
  • I considered that, but I don't want to wait a half second to farm the next job out, nor do I want to force a half second wait if the call already took 1.7 seconds to complete. I just want to ensure AT LEAST a half second has passed since the last actual http call was sent. It it has already been that long or longer, no delay should be introduced. The code in my own answer seems to do the trick with the sync.mutex. – Mike in SAT Feb 6 '15 at 20:55
  • But thst's exactly what's happening. The ticker will not introduce more delay than the duration defined. So, in this particular example, if you block on the ticker after the 500ms have passed, it will not block 500ms more. – iccananea Feb 8 '15 at 14:58
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Your new code is better. As mentioned in another answer you had a race. Go has a built in race detector go build -race. It's an amazing tool and would have found the race for you with a good unit test.

I believe one of your initial assumptions is flawed. By pacing all API calls you eliminate the chance for any bursting. In your scheme every API call takes a latency hit even when it might not have to. Unless you are sure that every API call is going to hit the throttle there is a better way.

Start a time.NewTicker to 10 seconds and initialize a counter to 0. Increment the counter for each API request. If the counter gets to 20 sleep the goroutines until the timer goes off. When the timer goes off reset the counter and continue the sleeping goroutines.

I've always wanted to code an API rate limiter so I coded it up and you can see it here: https://github.com/tildeleb/limiter/blob/master/limiter.go

Except for the example, it's untested. Any feedback, please create an issue on github.

0

Answering my own question, as I happened across a few solutions late last night. The simplest answer for me was to use a sync.Mutex variable to lock and unlock the throttle function to make sure I wasn't accidentally hitting it at the same time. Another option would have been to move my throttling service to be housed in its own goroutine function (thus eliminating concurrent calls) and communicating throttled/OK with channels, but for this application the Mutex was a cleaner solution. Here is the simplified version of the working code for those looking for a similar solution:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "time"
    "sync"
)

type tStruct struct {
    delay time.Duration
    last time.Time
    lock sync.Mutex //this will be our locking variable
}

func (t *tStruct) createT() *tStruct {
    return &tStruct {
        delay: 500*time.Millisecond,
        last: time.Now(),
    }
}

func (t *tStruct) throttle(th int) {
    //we lock our function, and any other routine calling this function will block.
    t.lock.Lock()
    //and we'll defer an unlock, so when we exit the throttle, we'll be ready for another call.
    defer t.lock.Unlock()
    fmt.Printf("\tThread %v Entering Throttle Check.\n", th)
    defer fmt.Printf("\tThread %v Leaving Throttle Check.\n", th)
    for {
        p := time.Now().Sub(t.last)
        if p < t.delay {
            fmt.Printf("\tThread %v Sleeping %v.\n", th, t.delay-p)
            time.Sleep(t.delay-p)
        } else {
            fmt.Printf("\tThread %v No longer Throttled.\n", th)
            t.last = time.Now()
            break
        }
    }
}

func (t *tStruct) worker(rch <-chan string, sch chan<- string, th int) {
    fmt.Printf("Thread %v starting up.\n", th)
    defer fmt.Printf("Thread %v Dead.\n", th)
    sch <-"READY"
    for {
        r := <-rch
        fmt.Printf("Thread %v received %v\n", th, r)
        switch r {
            case "STOP":
                fmt.Printf("Thread %v returning.\n", th)
                sch <-"QUITTING"
                return
            default:
                fmt.Printf("Thread %v processing %v.\n", th, r)
                t.throttle(th)
                fmt.Printf("Thread %v done with %v.\n", th, r)
                sch <-"OK"
        }
    }
}

func main() {
    ts := tStruct{}
    ts.delay = 500*time.Millisecond
    ts.last = time.Now()
    sch := make(chan string)
    rch := make(chan string)
    tC := 3
    tA := 0

    fmt.Println("Starting Threads")
    for i:=1; i<(tC+1); i++ {
        go ts.worker(sch, rch, i)
        r := <-rch
        if r=="READY" {
            tA++
        } else {
            fmt.Println("ERROR not READY")
        }
    }

    fmt.Println("Feeding All Threads")
    for i:=1; i<(tC+1); i++ {
        sch <- "WORK"
    }

    fmt.Println("Listening for threads")
    for tA > 0{
        r := <-rch
        switch r {
            case "QUITTING":
                tA--
                fmt.Println("main received QUITTING")
                continue
            case "OK":
                fmt.Println("main received OK")
                sch <-"STOP"
                continue
            default:
                fmt.Println("Shouldn't be here!!!")
        }
    }
}
  • Accepting my own answer, as this solution worked perfectly in production. several hundred long calls (~1-2 seconds per query) executed with no noticeable delay between them and overall time was greatly reduced by threading the calls, and several thousand short calls (< .5 seconds per query) were properly throttled to exactly the amount they needed to be and no more. A benefit from threading was still seen, as the processing of the return data was also done in the goroutines. – Mike in SAT Feb 11 '15 at 17:03

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