-1

This question already has an answer here:

I want to write a small script to tell me if the bass level is OK or not from user input.

I am just learning user input, and this is what I have so far:

def crisp():
    bass = input("Enter bass level on a scale of 1 to 5>>")
    print ("Bass level is at") + bass
    if bass >=4:
       print ("Bass is crisp")    
    elif bass < 4:
       print ("Bass is not so crisp")

marked as duplicate by Aran-Fey python Sep 9 '18 at 11:09

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 2
    What is the problem you are having? From the looks of it you need to convert bass to an int. Your first print statement also needs to have everything in the brackets. – Holloway Feb 6 '15 at 16:08
  • What is the question? – Peter Mortensen Feb 6 '15 at 16:31
0

I really don't see a problem here, but just a simple program that does this and only this would be as so:

a=1
while a==1:
    try:
        bass = input('Enter Bass Level: ')
        print('Bass level is at ' + str(bass))
        if bass >=4:
            print("Bass is crisp")
        elif bass < 4:
            print('Bass is not so crisp')
        a=0
    except ValueError:
        print('Invalid Entry')
        a=1

Not much difference with a function:

def Bass():
    a=1
    while a==0:
        try:
            bass = input('Enter Bass Level: ')
            print('Bass level is at ' + str(bass))
            if int(bass) >=4:
                print("Bass is crisp")
            elif bass < 4:
                print('Bass is not so crisp')
            a=0
    except ValueError:
        print('Invalid Entry')
        a=1
  • 2
    Your code is with Python 2.x in mind. In Python 3.x, raw_input from 2.x is the default behavior of input in 3.x. Considering the title mentions 3.4, this answer is technically wrong, but still possibly helpful. For future viewers: use raw_input instead of input in Python 2.x code for security reasons. – Poik Feb 6 '15 at 16:28
  • Thanks for the explanations. I have not used "try" yet. I will check it out. – jahrich Feb 6 '15 at 16:41
  • Very useful. as I am learning in 2 and using a 3 interpreter of IDLE. – jahrich Feb 6 '15 at 16:43
  • @jahrich this answer is inaccurate, first, the indentation is off. Second, you cannot catch a SyntaxError that way in python-3.x – A.J. Uppal Feb 6 '15 at 16:46
  • @A.J. I corrected SyntaxError to ValueError and fixed the bass var. for 3.4. – Ben Morris Feb 6 '15 at 17:29
3

When you take in input() through the built-in function, it takes input as a string.

>>> x = input('Input: ')
Input: 1
>>> x
"1"

Instead, cast int() to your input():

>>> x = int(input('Input: '))
Input: 1
>>> x
1

Otherwise, in your code, you are checking if "4" == 4:, which is never true.

Thus, here is your edited code:

def crisp():
    bass = int(input("Enter bass level on a scale of 1 to 5>>"))
    print ("Bass level is at") + bass
    if bass >=4:
       print ("Bass is crisp")    
    elif bass < 4:
       print ("Bass is not so crisp")
1

Convert to an integer:

bass = int(input("Enter bass level on a scale of 1 to 5>>"))
  • Thanks you I did not define bass as an int. :) – jahrich Feb 6 '15 at 16:42
  • Be sure to upvote or mark as answer. – Malik Brahimi Feb 6 '15 at 18:13

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