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The Java™ Tutorials state that "this data type [double] should never be used for precise values, such as currency." Is the fact that an ORM / DSL is returning floating point numbers for database columns storing values to be used to calculate monetary amounts a problem? I'm using QueryDSL and I'm dealing with money. QueryDSL is returning a Double for any number with a precision up to 16 and a BigDecimal thereafter. This concerns me as I'm aware that floating point arithmetic isn't suitable for currency calculations.

From this QueryDSL issue I'm led to believe that Hibernate does the same thing; see OracleDialect. Why does it use a Double rather than a BigDecimal? Is it safe to retrieve the Double and construct a BigDecimal, or is there a chance that a number with a precision of less than 16 could be incorrectly represented? Is it only when performing arithmetic operations that a Double can have floating-point issues, or are there values to which it cannot be accurately initialised?

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There seems to be several concerns mentioned in the question, comments, and answers by Robert Bain. I've collected and paraphrased some of these.

  1. Is it safe to use a double to store a precise value?

    Yes, provided the number of significant-digits (precision) is small enough.

    From wikipedia

    If a decimal string with at most 15 significant digits is converted to IEEE 754 double precision representation and then converted back to a string with the same number of significant digits, then the final string should match the original.

    • But new BigDecimal(1000.1d) has the value 1000.1000000000000227373675443232059478759765625, why not 1000.1?

      In the quote above I added emphasis - when converted from a double the number of significant digits must be specified, e.g.

      new BigDecimal(1000.1d, new MathContext(15))

  2. Is it safe to use a double for arbitrary arithmetic on precise values?

    No, each intermediate value used in the calculation could introduce additional error.

Using a double to store exact values should be seen as an optimization. It introduces risk that if care is not taken, precision could be lost. Using a BigDecimal is much less likely to have unexpected consequences and should be your default choice.

  1. Is it correct that QueryDSL returns a double for precise value?

    It is not necessarily incorrect, but is probably not desirable. I would suggest you engage with the QueryDSL developers... but I see you have already raised an issue and they intend to change this behavior.

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Using floating point numbers for storing money is a bad idea indeed. Floating points can approximate an operation result, but that's not what you want when dealing with money.

The easiest way to fix it, in a database portable way, is to simply store cents. This is the proffered way of dealing with currency operations in financial operations. Pay attention that most databases use the half-away from zero rounding algorithm, so make sure that's appropriate in your context.

When it comes to money you should always ask a local accountant, especially for the rounding part. Better safe then sorry.

Now back to your questions:

  1. Is it safe to retrieve the Double and construct a BigDecimal, or is there a chance that a number with a precision of less than 16 could be incorrectly represented?

    This is a safe operation as long as your database uses at most a 16 digit precision. If it uses a higher precision, you'd need to override the OracleDialect and

  2. Is it only when performing arithmetic operations that a Double can have floating-point issues, or are there values to which it cannot be accurately initialised?

    When performing arithmetic operations you must always take into consideration the monetary rounding anyway, and that applies to BigDecimal as well. So if you can guarantee that the database value doesn't loose any decimal when being cast to a java Double, you are fine to create a BigDecimal from it. Using BigDecimal pays off when applying arithmetic operations to the database loaded value.

As for the threshold of 16, according to Wiki:

The 11 bit width of the exponent allows the representation of numbers with a decimal exponent between 10−308 and 10308, with full 15–17 decimal digits precision. By compromising precision, subnormal representation allows values smaller than 10−323.

  • Thanks for your input, Vlad. The situation I'm in, is that I'm pulling a 5 decimal place fund price from a third party database. Funds have a price each day and individuals own a number of units of that fund, so in this case, I'm afraid that storing the cents (or pennies where I am) isn't something that would help matters. I'll edit the question to make this clear. – Robert Bain Feb 8 '15 at 22:09
  • Check my updated answer. – Vlad Mihalcea Feb 8 '15 at 22:28
  • Thanks Vlad. Why is representing a number as a double safe up to 16 digit precision? What is it that makes the 16 digit precision the threshold? I was curious about this, as the Hibernate implementation specifically switches to BigDecimal as the precision exceeds 16. – Robert Bain Feb 8 '15 at 22:35
  • Based on your answer to my question about the 16 decimal digit precision threshold, can you explain the value of BigDecimal foo = new BigDecimal(1000.1d) mentioned in my answer, which appears to contradict your assertion that "This is a safe operation as long as your database uses at most a 16 digit precision". Thanks, Rob. – Robert Bain Feb 10 '15 at 15:46
  • But you will never get absolute precision and that's why rounding is so important. You can easily get a non fixed decimal result during a division anyway. So, if an accountant doesn't use a 16 digits precision, are you absolutely sure you need it? – Vlad Mihalcea Feb 10 '15 at 15:57
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After much deliberation, I must conclude that the answer to my own question:

Is the fact that an ORM / DSL is returning floating point numbers for database columns storing values to be used to calculate monetary amounts a problem?

put simply, is yes. Please read on.

Is it safe to retrieve the Double and construct a BigDecimal, or is there a chance that a number with a precision of less than 16 could be incorrectly represented?

A number with a precision of less than 16 decimal digits is incorrectly represented in the following example.

BigDecimal foo = new BigDecimal(1000.1d);

The BigDecimal value of foo is 1000.1000000000000227373675443232059478759765625. 1000.1 has a precision of 1 and is being misrepresented from precision 14 of the BigDecimal value.

Is it only when performing arithmetic operations that a Double can have floating-point issues, or are there values to which it cannot be accurately initialised?

As per the example above, there are values to which it cannot be accurately initialised. As The Java™ Tutorials clearly states, "This data type [float / double] should never be used for precise values, such as currency. For that, you will need to use the java.math.BigDecimal class instead."

Interestingly, calling BigDecimal.valueOf(someDouble) appeared at first to magically resolve things but upon realising that it calls Double.toString() then reading Double's documentation it became apparent that this is not appropriate for exact values either.

In conclusion, when dealing with exact values, floating point numbers are never appropriate. As such, in my mind, ORMs / DSLs should be mapping to BigDecimal unless otherwise specified, given that most database use will involve the calculation of exact values.

Update:

Based on this conclusion, I've raised this issue with QueryDSL.

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It is not only about arithmetic operations, but also about pure read&write. Oracle NUMBER and BigDecimal do both use decadic base. So when you read number from database and then you store it back you can be sure, that the same number was written. (Unless it exceeds Oracle's limit of 38 digits).

If you convert NUMBER into binary base (Double) and then you convert it back do decadic then you might expect problems. And also this operation must be much slower.

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