17

We have an ASP.NET MVC 5 app using Owin cookie authentication. Currently, we set up cookie authentication as follows:

public partial class Startup
{
    public void ConfigureAuth(IAppBuilder app)
    {
        var timeoutInMinutes = int.Parse(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["cookie.timeout-minutes"]);

        app.UseCookieAuthentication(new CookieAuthenticationOptions
        {
            AuthenticationType = DefaultAuthenticationTypes.ApplicationCookie,
            AuthenticationMode = AuthenticationMode.Active,
            LoginPath = new PathString("/"),
            ExpireTimeSpan = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(timeoutInMinutes),
            SlidingExpiration = true,
            LogoutPath = new PathString("/Sessions/Logout")
        });
    }
}

We have a feature request to allow our application's admins to customize session timeouts within their organizations. However, the configuration code above executes at the MVC application level and our app is multi-tenant. Does anyone know of a way to set the ExpireTimeSpan of a user's session on a per-user basis, either during authentication or by overriding an Owin pipeline event somewhere?

Thanks in advance!

15

The authentication options contains a property called Provider. You can either set this to the default provider and use one of the method overrides such as OnResponseSignIn to modify the settings of the login, or you could implement your own ICookieAuthenticationProvider and do the same.

app.UseCookieAuthentication(new CookieAuthenticationOptions
{
    Provider = new CookieAuthenticationProvider
    {
        OnResponseSignIn = signInContext =>
        {
            var expireTimeSpan = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(15);

            if (signInContext.Properties.Dictionary["organization"] == "org-1")
            {
                expireTimeSpan = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(45);
            }

            signInContext.Properties.ExpiresUtc = DateTime.UtcNow.Add(expireTimeSpan);
        }
    }
});

You could either check the incoming claim to see how the session should be handled or you could add custom data to your sign in call.

context.Authentication.SignIn(new AuthenticationProperties
{
    Dictionary =
    {
        { "organization", "org-3" }
    }
}, new ClaimsIdentity());

You could even set ExpiresUtc on the sign in call if you really wanted, though it might be best to leave that logic in the authentication provider so it's easier to manage.

  • This worked, thank you! – John Hann Feb 9 '15 at 23:52
  • ExpiresUtc didn't seem to work for me, though this looks promising. – Dustin E May 19 '15 at 14:47
  • I'm a little bit baffled by how this works; specifically, this approach provided a sliding expiration, and I don't see how that's possible. OnResponseSignIn is only called once, when logging in, and the ExpiresUtc is set to a specific clock time. So if I logged in at 12:01, ExpiresUtc gets set to 12:16... but if I make a request at 12:05, although a breakpoint in OnResponseSignIn is never hit again, my login does not expire at 12:16 but stays valid until 12:20. My cookie should still say 12:16 despite the subsequent request, so how is that possible? – Grank Jan 28 '16 at 19:06
  • 1
    @Grank the cookie middleware handles adjusting the expiration time. So if you have SlidingExpiration and AllowRefresh set to true then the middleware will calculate what the session duration was, and push the time out from there. The code for this is in the AuthenticateCoreAsync method in katanaproject.codeplex.com/SourceControl/latest#src/… – Brian Surowiec Jan 28 '16 at 22:04
  • This method does indeed work, as the AuthenticationProperties dictionary is being serialized into the cookie itself, hence when a refresh occurs and the OnResponseSignin is called again, you'll have access to the original value you've set up at login. I've used the same mechanism as the one described here, but I've decided to store the the computed expiration timespan in a custom entry on the AuthenticationProperties dictionary at login. No reason to add additional logic to compute it every time. – MoonStom Feb 5 '16 at 19:45

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