9

In a SQL Server database, I record people's date of birth. Is there an straight-forward method of working out the person's age on a given date using SQL only?

Using DATEDIFF(YEAR, DateOfBirth, GETDATE()) does not work as this only looks at the year part of the date. For example DATEDIFF(YEAR, '31 December 2007', '01 January 2008') returns 1.

21

Check out this article: How to calculate age of a person using SQL codes

Here is the code from the article:

DECLARE @BirthDate DATETIME
DECLARE @CurrentDate DATETIME

SELECT @CurrentDate = '20070210', @BirthDate = '19790519'

SELECT DATEDIFF(YY, @BirthDate, @CurrentDate) - CASE WHEN( (MONTH(@BirthDate)*100 + DAY(@BirthDate)) > (MONTH(@CurrentDate)*100 + DAY(@CurrentDate)) ) THEN 1 ELSE 0 END 
2
  • 2
    Could you actually put the pertinent code in your answer? Links to other websites can (and do) break, and so in future this answer may not be useful if the link no longer works. – Tim C Nov 12 '08 at 12:24
  • @Tim C +1 for suggesting adding code since the website is currently down and this answer would have been useless with only a link. – Michael Minton Nov 1 '11 at 22:42
5

There is another way that is a bit simpler:

Select CAST(DATEDIFF(hh, [birthdate], GETDATE()) / 8766 AS int) AS Age

Because the rounding here is very granular, this is almost perfectly accurate. The exceptions are so convoluted that they are almost humorous: every fourth year the age returned will be one year too young if we A) ask for the age before 6:00 AM, B) on the person's birthday and C) their birthday is after February 28th. In my setting, this is a perfectly acceptable compromise.

1
  • If you replace GETDATE() with a static value you will hit the exception more often since you are checking at midnight. It looks like checking from noon rather than midnight would work. – Guvante Sep 12 '14 at 16:50
2

FWIW, Age can be computed in a straightforward manner without resorting to hacks (not that there's anything wrong with hacks!):

CREATE FUNCTION Age (@BirthDate DATETIME)
RETURNS INT
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @AgeOnBirthdayThisYear INT
    DECLARE @BirthdayThisYear DATETIME
    SET @AgeOnBirthdayThisYear = DATEDIFF(year, @BirthDate, GETDATE())
    SET @BirthdayThisYear = DATEADD(year, @AgeOnBirthdayThisYear, @BirthDate)
    RETURN
        @AgeOnBirthdayThisYear
        - CASE WHEN @BirthdayThisYear > GETDATE() THEN 1 ELSE 0 END
END
1

This solution show how in one query without variables

SELECT DATEDIFF(YY, birthdate, GETDATE()) - CASE WHEN( (MONTH(birthdate)*100 + DAY(birthdate)) > (MONTH(GETDATE())*100 + DAY(GETDATE())) ) THEN 1 ELSE 0 END
1

This is more concise and a bit faster than the answers provided, and completely accurate:

datediff(year,DateOfBirth,getdate()-datepart(dy,DateOfBirth)+1)
1
  • This method doesn't work when GetDate() is the birth date. Here's an example where the person should be 40 years old but it only returns 39. SELECT datediff(year,'1/29/1973',CAST('1/29/2013' AS DATETIME)-datepart(dy,'1/29/1973')) – Rob Jefferies Jan 29 '13 at 20:39
0

I hope this one is perfect provided you accept the algorithm that a leap-baby turns a year older on successive February 29th's, or March 1's on non-leap years. @DOB must contain a date within a few centuries of now, @AsOf must contain a similar date >= @DOB:

SET @Age = YEAR(@AsOf) - YEAR(@DOB) - 1
IF MONTH(@AsOf) * 100 + DAY(@AsOf) >= MONTH(@DOB) * 100 + DAY(@DOB)
    SET @Age = @Age + 1

I'd REALLY REALLY appreciate any testing and comments as I haven't found a way yet to break it... yet.

Added - 1/31/2014: This one seems to work perfectly too even though at first glance it looks too crude:

SET @Age = FLOOR(DATEDIFF(dd,@DOB,@CompareDate)/365.25)

Pop these in a function and here's a test script:

    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('2/27/2008', '2/27/2012')
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('2/27/2008', '2/28/2012')
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('2/27/2008', '2/29/2012')
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('2/27/2008', '3/1/2012')
    -- 4 4 4 4
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('2/28/2008', '2/27/2012')
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('2/28/2008', '2/28/2012')
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('2/28/2008', '2/29/2012')
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('2/28/2008', '3/1/2012')
    -- 3 4 4 4
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('2/29/2008', '2/27/2012')
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('2/29/2008', '2/28/2012')
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('2/29/2008', '2/29/2012')
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('2/29/2008', '3/1/2012')
    -- 3 3 4 4
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('3/1/2008', '2/27/2012')
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('3/1/2008', '2/28/2012')
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('3/1/2008', '2/29/2012')
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('3/1/2008', '3/1/2012')
    -- 3 3 3 4
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('3/1/2007', '2/27/2012')
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('3/1/2007', '2/28/2012')
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('3/1/2007', '2/29/2012')
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('3/1/2007', '3/1/2012')
    -- 4 4 4 5
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('3/1/2007', '2/27/2013')
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('3/1/2007', '2/28/2013')
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('3/1/2007', '3/1/2013')
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('2/27/2007', '2/28/2013')
    SELECT dbo.fnGetAge('2/28/2007', '2/28/2014')
    -- 5 5 6 6 7

Cheers

PS: You can probably tweak the February 29 decision to being a day earlier if that floats your boat.

0
SELECT Pname, DOB, DATEDIFF(YEAR, DOB, GETDATE()) AS Age
FROM tablename
1
  • a little explanation can go a long way – davejal Jan 13 '16 at 1:31

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