1

I have long string of text like this:

AAAABBBBCCCCDDDDEEEEFFFFGGGGHHHH

But I'd like to display it like this for readability purposes:

AAAA BBBB CCCC DDDD EEEE FFFF GGGG HHHH

When highlighted and copied this string must remain unbroken, so I can't simply use spaces.

How do I visually break up this string into chunks using CSS but preserve the original text formatting?

edit: I would like to avoid JS if at all possible

5
  • this should be tagged as javascript.
    – Stickers
    Feb 6, 2015 at 23:42
  • you can use <wbr> tag to split your data Feb 6, 2015 at 23:45
  • @sdcr the op never mentioned js, they're trying to do it via css or html.
    – CalebB
    Feb 6, 2015 at 23:48
  • I would recommend looking into a simple js script, a simple substring function should do the trick for you.
    – CalebB
    Feb 6, 2015 at 23:49
  • who would think extra html tag is allowed apart from @Walle Cyril
    – Stickers
    Feb 7, 2015 at 3:10

2 Answers 2

0

Note that when you copy the thing no spaces are copied! Why ? Because there are no content(html) spaces only style(css) spaces.this is the trick:

<style>
.add_spaces > span::after {
    content:" ";
}
</style>
<div class="add_spaces">
    <span>AAAA</span><span>BBBB</span><span>CCCC</span><span>DDDD</span><span>EEEE</span><span>FFFF</span><span>GGGG</span><span>HHHH</span>
</div>
0
0

You need some markup that designates the substrings as elements, since otherwise they cannot be styled in CSS. The markup could be generated with JavaScript, but for this you would need exact rules (an algorithm) for splitting the string.

Assuming the markup can be added into the HTML file itself, you can simply set right padding for each of the substrings except the last. (You can alternatively set padding on all substrings but leave the last one unmarked in markup.)

<style>
.spaced span {
   padding-right: 0.15em;
}
.spaced span:last-child {
   padding: 0;
}
</style>
<div class="spaced">
<span>AAAA</span><span>BBBB</span><span>CCCC</span><span>DDDD</span><span>EEEE</span><span>FFFF</span><span>GGGG</span><span>HHHH</span>
</div>

In this approach, you can freely tune the amount of spacing, e.g. making it less than the width of a space (which is about 0.25em on the average).

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