8

Using bitwise operator how can I test if the n least significant bits of an integer are either all sets or all not sets.

For example if n = 3 I only care about the 3 least significant bits the test should return true for 0 and 7 and false for all other values between 0 and 7.

Of course I could do if x = 0 or x = 7, but I would prefer something using bitwise operators.

Bonus points if the technique can be adapted to take into accounts all the bits defined by a mask.

Clarification :

If I wanted to test if bit one or two is set I could to if ((x & 1 != 0) && (x & 2 != 0)). But I could do the "more efficient" if ((x & 3) != 0).

I'm trying to find a "hack" like this to answer the question "Are all bits of x that match this mask all set or all unset?"

The easy way is if ((x & mask) == 0 || (x & mask) == mask). I'd like to find a way to do this in a single test without the || operator.

  • What is the use case? Why do you want such a method – Nikunj Banka Feb 8 '15 at 4:48
  • I'm got interested in bit manipulation hacks by reading here graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html and I'm trying to find a way to tests if all bits of a masked are either all 1 or all 0. It's just curiosity, I wonder if it can be done. – Mathieu Pagé Feb 8 '15 at 4:52
  • several answers make the mistake of writing 1 << n. This causes undefined behaviour if n >= 31 (if you're on a 32-bit int system). The 1 needs to be cast to be of unsigned type that is at least as wide as the value you are testing. – M.M Feb 8 '15 at 21:29
10

Using bitwise operator how can I test if the n least significant bits of an integer are either all sets or all not sets.

To get a mask for the last n significant bits, thats

(1ULL << n) - 1

So the simple test is:

bool test_all_or_none(uint64_t val, uint64_t n)
{
    uint64_t mask = (1ULL << n) - 1;
    val &= mask;
    return val == mask || val == 0;
}

If you want to avoid the ||, we'll have to take advantage of integer overflow. For the cases we want, after the &, val is either 0 or (let's say n == 8) 0xff. So val - 1 is either 0xffffffffffffffff or 0xfe. The failure causes are 1 thru 0xfe, which become 0 through 0xfd. Thus the success cases are call at least 0xfe, which is mask - 1:

bool test_all_or_none(uint64_t val, uint64_t n)
{
    uint64_t mask = (1ULL << n) - 1;
    val &= mask;
    return (val - 1) >= (mask - 1);
}

We can also test by adding 1 instead of subtracting 1, which is probably the best solution (here once we add one to val, val & mask should become either 0 or 1 for our success cases):

bool test_all_or_none(uint64_t val, uint64_t n)
{
    uint64_t mask = (1ULL << n) - 1;
    return ((val + 1) & mask) <= 1;
}     

For an arbitrary mask, the subtraction method works for the same reason that it worked for the specific mask case: the 0 flips to be the largest possible value:

bool test_all_or_none(uint64_t val, uint64_t mask)
{
    return ((val & mask) - 1) >= (mask - 1);
}
  • I'm not looking for a way to test them separately. I want to test for both at the same time. – Mathieu Pagé Feb 8 '15 at 4:53
  • @MathieuPagé Came up with an even better one. – Barry Feb 8 '15 at 5:00
  • Nice one. This answer my original question where I wanted to test the n least significant bits. If we don't find a version that works for an arbitrary mask I'll accept this answer. Thanks. – Mathieu Pagé Feb 8 '15 at 5:06
  • 1
    @Barry just came up with ((x+1)&mask)<=1; independently; nice job! – imallett Feb 8 '15 at 5:07
  • @MathieuPagé The subtraction method works for an arbitrary mask - for the same reason it works for the specific n-bits one. – Barry Feb 8 '15 at 5:13
3

How about?

int mask = (1<<n)-1;
if ((x&mask)==mask || (x&mask)==0) { /*do whatever*/ }

The only really tricky part is the calculation of the mask. It basically just shifts a 1 over to get 0b0...0100...0 and then subtracts one to make it 0b0...0011...1.

Maybe you can clarify what you wanted for the test?

  • I wish to test it without using the || operator. – Mathieu Pagé Feb 8 '15 at 4:55
  • 1
    @MathieuPagé use | – ryanpattison Feb 8 '15 at 5:05
  • @MattMcNabb indeed; while I remembered on the first term, it was left out on the second. Fixed. – imallett Feb 8 '15 at 22:11
1

Here's what you wanted to do, in one function (untested, but you should get the idea). Returns 0 if the n last bits are not set, 1 if they are all set, -1 otherwise.

int lastBitsSet(int num, int n){
    int mask = (1 << n) - 1; //n 1-s
    if (!(num & mask)) //we got all 0-s
        return 0;
    if (!(~num & mask)) //we got all 1-s
        return 1;
    else
        return -1;
}
  • Hi Mints97, I'm looking for a way to do it in a single test. @Barry found a way to do it for the case where the mask cover the n lest significants bits. – Mathieu Pagé Feb 8 '15 at 5:14
  • @MathieuPagé: yes, but his method doesn't distinguish between the cases where the last bits are all set or all not set. – Mints97 Feb 8 '15 at 5:17
  • Indeed. That was what I was looking for. – Mathieu Pagé Feb 8 '15 at 5:25
  • @MathieuPagé: I'm sorry, I must have misunderstood your question then =) – Mints97 Feb 8 '15 at 5:30
  • @Mits97, that's ok. Someone else who land on this question in the future might wants to differentiate the two and your answer will be valuable to them. – Mathieu Pagé Feb 8 '15 at 5:32
0

To test if all aren't set, you just need to mask-in only the bits you want, then you just need to compare to zero.

The fun starts when you define the oposite function by just inverting the input :)

//Test if the n least significant bits arent set:
char n_least_arent_set(unsigned int n, unsigned int value){
  unsigned int mask = pow(2, n) - 1; // e. g. 2^3 - 1 = b111
  int masked_value = value & mask;
  return masked_value == 0; // if all are zero, the mask operation returns a full-zero.      
}

//test if the n least significant bits are set:
char n_least_are_set(unsigned int n, unsigned int value){
  unsigned int rev_value = ~value;
  return n_least_arent_set(n, rev_value);    
}

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