2
class Grandfather {

    protected function stuff() {
        // Code.
    } 
}

class Dad extends Grandfather {
    function __construct() {
        // I can refer to a member in the parent class easily.
        parent::stuff();
    }
}

class Kid extends Dad {
        // How do I refer to the stuff() method which is inside the Grandfather class from here?
}

How can I refer to a member of the Grandfather class from within the Kid class?

My first thought was Classname::method() but is there a keyword available such as self or parent?

  • 2
    Have you tried parent::parent::stuff() ? – Noman Ur Rehman Feb 8 '15 at 11:35
  • I haven't tried parent::parent::stuff(). Do you have any further info on it? – henrywright Feb 8 '15 at 11:45
  • it won't work @NomanUrRehman, it will casue syntax error like this: PHP Parse error: syntax error, unexpected '::' (T_PAAMAYIM_NEKUDOTAYIM) – Kamil Karkus Feb 8 '15 at 11:46
  • Are you trying to by pass the parent method and go to the unextended grandparent one? The parent class already includes all the grandparent ones but they may be extended. – Elin Feb 8 '15 at 11:48
3
  1. If stuff() is nowhere overriden in the class hierarchy you can call the function with $this->stuff()
  2. If stuff() were to be overriden in Dad you have to call the function with the classname, e.g. Grandfather::stuff()
  3. If stuff() is overriden in Kid, you can do the call via parent::stuff()
  • 3
    Your classes are extending from Grandfather, hence you inherit all of the properties of Grandfather - i.e. this will call the stuff() function in the Grandfather – Tyron Feb 8 '15 at 11:38
  • OK but what if I had function stuff() inside Kid? I need to refer to the method in the Grandfather class. Do you see what I mean? – henrywright Feb 8 '15 at 12:01
  • Then you'd have to use Grandfather::stuff() as others mentioned here already. It's not a very clean way though in my opinion - what are your intentions? Perhaps a different design pattern altogether will give you a better solution. – Tyron Feb 8 '15 at 12:09
  • Thanks for the advice @Tyron, I don't have an actual project open, It's just something that I came across whilst reading an article last week that wasn't made clear and I've be meaning to seek clarification on. – henrywright Feb 8 '15 at 12:17
  • Err ops, one correction. If you have function stuff() inside Kid, you can still call parent::stuff(). Only if you have function stuff() inside Dad, you'd need to use Grandfather::stuff(). In any case, I would design my functions in a way that Dad does not need to override functionality I would need in Kid but instead place that part in a seperate function. – Tyron Feb 8 '15 at 12:24
5

$this->stuff() or Grandfather::stuff()

calling with this will call ::stuff() method on the top of inherit level (in your example it'd be Dad::stuff(), but you don't override ::stuff in Dad class so it'd be Grandfather::stuff())

and Class::method() will call exact class method

Example code:

    <?php
class Grandfather {

    protected function stuff() {
        echo "Yeeeh";
        // Code.
    } 
}

class Dad extends Grandfather {
    function __construct() {
        // I can refer to a member in the parent class easily.
        parent::stuff();
    }
}

class Kid extends Dad {
    public function doThatStuff(){
        Grandfather::stuff();
    }
      // How do I refer to the stuff() method which is inside the Grandfather class from here?
}
$Kid = new Kid();
$Kid->doThatStuff();

The "Yeeeh" will be outputted 2 times. Because constructor of Dad (which is not overrided in Kid class) class calls Grandfather::stuff() and Kid::doThatStuff() calls it too

  • Thanks for your answer. +1 from me – henrywright Feb 8 '15 at 12:37
1

If you want call Grandfather::stuff method you can do this using Grandfather::stuff() in Kid class.

Look at this example.

  • So you have to use Class_Name::method()? I suppose my question should have been is there a keyword available like parent and self when you're referring to more than one level up the hierarchy? – henrywright Feb 8 '15 at 11:42

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