2

When adding a new function to a prototype like this you don't have access to variables defined in the constructor function because they are out of scope.

function Thing() {
    var something = 357;
}

Thing.prototype.doSomething = function () {
    // no access to something because it is out of scope
    console.log(something);
};

Thanks to closures when adding the function to the prototype within the constructor function it has access to variables defined there.

function Thing() {
    var something = 357;

    Thing.prototype.doSomething = function () {
        console.log(something);
    };
}

Is this an okay way to get access to those variables or is there any better pattern to achieve the same goal? Are there any pitfalls I have to look out for?

  • 1
    The obvious issue is that every time you call the constructor, a new function object is assigned to doSomething. That may not be an issue, but it does seem wasteful. Why not just make something a public property? – RobG Feb 8 '15 at 23:09
  • @RobG, a good object oriented definition with private (and protected) members is a lot better. However, I agree that the prototype definition as proposed by Eclecticist is a lot better. And the Google closure compiler can help you to make sure it is correct. – Alexis Wilke Feb 8 '15 at 23:58
  • @RobG Thats really obvious. I don't know how I could miss that. Thank you. – urbaindepuce Feb 9 '15 at 7:47
1

There's some fatal flaws with your design:

  • The prototype function is redefined each time the constructor is called.
  • All instances will share the same variable.

Redefining functions each time the constructor is called is unavoidable with privileged functions, but if you choose to go down that path, you would define the functions directly on this rather than the prototype.

function SomeObject() {
    var privateVar = 'private value';

    this.somePriviledgedFunction = function () {
        //Use privateVar here
    };
} 

Now, with the support of WeakMap, there's a new pattern that would let you access private members from functions defined on the prototype. You would basically use an IIFE around your class declaration and have a shared WeakMap only visible within that scope to hold all private members. Object instances will be used as keys so that their values gets garbage collected when the objects are no longer around.

var SomeObject = (function (privates) {

    function SomeObject(someValue) {
        privates.set(this, {}); //initialze the privates scope
        privates.get(this).privateVar = someValue;
    }

   Object.defineProperty(SomeObject.prototype, 'privateVar', {
       get: function () {
           return privates.get(this).privateVar;
       }
   });

  return SomeObject;

})(new WeakMap());

var o1 = new SomeObject('first object');
var o2 = new SomeObject('second object');

o1.privateVar; //first object
o2.privateVar; //second object

However, note that every SomeObject's prototype functions that need access to private variables will have to be defined within the same module (within the surrounding IIFE). Another issue would be that other instances of a class could potentially steal other's privates if one is not careful with the design, but not from any function defined outside the IIFE, so that's no a real issue to me.

| improve this answer | |
  • That pattern is nice, thanks. Returning the constructor function as closure from an IIFE never occured to me. But do I need the privates parameter? Couldn't I just define privates in the IIFE? To clarify the privates don't hold constant values. They are initialized when creating an instance and will most likely differ with each instance. Once the instance is created they should not be changed though. – urbaindepuce Feb 9 '15 at 8:04
  • Okay, I tried it out now. I see now that the privates will hold the same values for all instances of course. Then you would need the WeakMapyou pass to the IIFE call. – urbaindepuce Feb 9 '15 at 8:24
  • @urbaindepuce You can declare the WeakMap inside the IIFE if you want, there's no difference, but not inside the constructor. Every instance will have it's own privates. If you want to make privates immutable once set you can either use Object.freeze or Object.defineProperty with writable: false. – plalx Feb 9 '15 at 13:11
  • I meant that if you define a local variable inside the IIFE and make it readable through a getter function added to the prototype, if that value changes, it changes for all instances, because it is always the same function object (the getter) called referencing the same value. – urbaindepuce Feb 9 '15 at 16:31
  • @urbaindepuce No, because this will be different in every invocation. The privates object will be the same, but privates.get(this).privateVar would be different for every instance. I modified the answer to show this holds true. – plalx Feb 9 '15 at 16:33
2

You won't be able to access a private variable from the prototype. You can, however, access public variables. I have found that this is a good tradeoff:

function Thing() {
    this._something = 357;
}

Thing.prototype.doSomething = function () {
    console.log(this._something);
};

The naming convention of placing a _ before a property is just an informal way of marking it as private, even though it actually isn't.

| improve this answer | |
  • Note that the Google JavaScript Linter (gjslint) expects the _ at the end, not the beginning. You should also have documentation and a prototype definition for the field Thing.prototype._something = 357;. Notice also that this way you can initialize it, although that is not true with objects and arrays... but it works well with strings and numbers. – Alexis Wilke Feb 8 '15 at 23:56
  • "You won't be able to access a private variable from the prototype". The OP does just that (where "private variable" means a variable held in a closure). – RobG Feb 9 '15 at 1:33
  • I guess, but with that method you're recreating that prototype function each time the constructor is called. – user3886234 Feb 9 '15 at 1:35
  • I wanted to add the function to the prototype to avoid creating a new function object when creating an instance, but missed that I am doing exactly that with the design I used. – urbaindepuce Feb 9 '15 at 7:54

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