59

I have my Java method as below;

public List<Lookup> findAll(String lang) {
    Query query = entityManager.createNamedQuery("Lookup.findAll");
    if (isValidLang(lang)) {
        query.setParameter("lang", lang);
        return query.getResultList();
    } else {
        //return empty list
    }
}

Now the method returns List for valid matches of lang.

But if that is not the case, I want to return an empty list. My question is how do I update the code & what is the best way to return an empty list so that the code does not fail ?

5 Answers 5

115

If you are using java 9 or later:

} else {
    return List.of();
}

If you are stuck with some version of java before 9:

} else { 
    return Collections.emptyList();
}

Notes:

  1. These constructs are the most efficient, because they reuse an existing instance of an empty list, so each time you ask for an empty list, no new list gets created. However, object allocation in Java is very inexpensive, so this should not really be a concern.
  2. The list returned by either List.of() or Collections.emptyList() is secretly immutable. By secretly I mean that it exposes mutation methods, but if you make the mistake of invoking any of those methods, you will be slapped with a runtime exception. In other, better languages than Java, (for example, in Scala,) there exist immutable / unmodifiable collections, but Java does not have such a thing out of the box. So, if you are sticking with Java in 2020, you are accepting the possibility that not all of your collections can be written to, despite the fact that they all look as if they can be written to.
  3. In general, functions are meant to return immutable entities, so if you are invoking a function which returns a collection and then you intend to modify that collection, you are doing it wrong. If you really need a collection that you can modify, you should instead write your function so that it populates a mutable list that you pass to it as a parameter, so it is evident that you, as the owner of the mutable list, are free to further modify the list after the function returns.
3
  • 6
    or new ArrayList() if the function caller wants to modify the returned list.
    – Emil Laine
    Feb 9, 2015 at 9:57
  • 4
    This is actually probably a bad idea for the given example... If the client modifies the returned List it forces them to make copies. new ArrayList<>(findAll(...)). Better not to randomly mix immutable/mutable. Your answer also doesn't explain that emptyList throws exceptions.
    – Radiodef
    Feb 9, 2015 at 19:50
  • If it was up to me I would declare that method to return an UnmodifiableList, but java out of the box does not have such a thing.
    – Mike Nakis
    Feb 9, 2015 at 20:02
12

Collections.emptyList() returns an immutable list, i.e., a list to which you cannot add elements if you want to perform any operation on your list, then create new instance of list and return it.

if (isValidLang(lang)) {
        query.setParameter("lang", lang);
        return query.getResultList();
    } else {
        return new ArrayList<Lookup>();  // return array list instance.
    }
1
10

With Java 9, you can now use the static factory method List::of to create an immutable empty list:

} else { 
    return List.of();
}
3

Try it like this:

public List<Lookup> findAll(String lang) {
    List<Lookup> result = new ArrayList<Lookup>();
    Query query = entityManager.createNamedQuery("Lookup.findAll");
    if (isValidLang(lang)) {
        query.setParameter("lang", lang);
        result = query.getResultList();
    }
    return result;
}
1

Using ternary operator (boolean_expression ? statement1 : statemetn2 ) in java we can check every return type whether it is null. If we do this once then every calling method using the code will be benefited because they do not have to check against null. Your code can be rewritten like this -

public List<Lookup> findAll(String lang) {
    Query query = entityManager.createNamedQuery("Lookup.findAll");
    ArrayList lookupList = null;

    if (isValidLang(lang)) {
        query.setParameter("lang", lang);
        lookupList = <ArrayList> query.getResultList();
    }

    return (null != lookupList ? lookupList : Collections.EMPTY_LIST);
} 

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.