9

The following compiles without error:

#include <memory>

std::unique_ptr<int> f() {
    std::unique_ptr<int> x(new int(42));
    return x;
}

int main() {
    std::unique_ptr<int> y = f();
}

I thought that the return value of f() was copy-initialized by x, but std::unique_ptr is a move-only type. How is it that this isn't ill-formed because the copy constructor isn't available? What is the relevant clause in the standard? Is there somewhere that says if f() is a move-only type than a return statement becomes a move construction instead of a copy construction?

16

I thought that the return value of f() was copy-initialized by x, but std::unique_ptr is a move-only type

The return value of f() is indeed copy-initialized from the expression x, but copy-initialization does not always imply copy-construction. If the expression is an rvalue, then the move constructor will be picked by overload resolution (assuming a move constructor is present).

Now although it is true that the expression x in the return x; statement is an lvalue (which may lead you to think that what I just wrote does not apply), in situations where a named object with automatic storage duration is returned, the compiler shall first try to treat the id-expression as an rvalue for overload resolution.

What is the relevant clause in the standard? Is there somewhere that says if f() is a move-only type than a return statement becomes a move construction instead of a copy construction?

Per paragraph 12.8/32 of the C++ Standard ([class.copy]/32, draft N4296):

When the criteria for elision of a copy/move operation are met, but not for an exception-declaration, and the object to be copied is designated by an lvalue, or when the expression in a return statement is a (possibly parenthesized) id-expression that names an object with automatic storage duration declared in the body or parameter-declaration-clause of the innermost enclosing function or lambda-expression, overload resolution to select the constructor for the copy is first performed as if the object were designated by an rvalue. [...]

  • .. and therefore the move constructor is eligible, rendering "the return value of f() was copy-initialized by x" false. </completed-this-answer> – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 9 '15 at 13:14
  • Best to say which C++ Standard you're quoting, since there have been several. – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 9 '15 at 13:15
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit: It does not make that statement false. AFAIK copy-initialization does not imply copy-construction. Concerning the Standard version, will edit that, thanks. – Andy Prowl Feb 9 '15 at 13:17
  • @AndyProwl: Oh ok well in that case the OP has a misconception ("the return value of f() was copy-initialized by x, but std::unique_ptr is a move-only type. How is it that this isn't ill-formed because the copy constructor isn't available?") so the answer could still use a conclusion. – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 9 '15 at 13:18
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit: Agreed, will elaborate. – Andy Prowl Feb 9 '15 at 13:19

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.