6

Given this sample code:

import pdb

for i in range(10):
  pdb.set_trace()
  print(str(i))

When I get the prompt from PDB, how can I skip an iteration of the loop, with the continue loop control statement, when it's also used by PDB, to continue code execution?

  • So, to be clear, you want the code to behave as though a continue statement were executed? You don't want str(i) to get printed for that loop, right? – Kevin Feb 9 '15 at 16:30
  • That's correct! – Andor Feb 9 '15 at 16:35
  • 1
    Incidentally, for the general problem of "how do I make a distinction between pdb commands and Python expressions that just look like pdb commands?", you can prefix your Python expression with an exclamation point. But this doesn't appear to work for continue in particular. – Kevin Feb 9 '15 at 16:50
  • @MartijnPieters If you add a pass statement at the end of the loop you can jump to the end of the loop, then continue and the next iteration of the loop will be initialised properly. – Dunes Feb 9 '15 at 16:52
  • Thanks for all of you! I also appreciate Kevin's comment, which is kind of a confirmation, that this can only be done with a workaround. – Andor Feb 9 '15 at 16:55
7

Sounds like a strange thing to want to do. You should be able to use the jump command though. You'll probably need to add a pass statement at the end of your for loop so you can jump to the end of the loop. If you're not sure of the line numbers of your code then you can use ll to find out the line numbers of your loop.

> c:\run.py(5)<module>()
-> print(i)
(Pdb) ll
  1     import pdb
  2     
  3     for i in range(10):
  4         pdb.set_trace()
  5  ->     print(i)
  6         pass
(Pdb) j 6
> c:\run.py(6)<module>()
-> pass
(Pdb) c
> c:\python\run.py(4)<module>()
-> pdb.set_trace()
(Pdb) c
1
> c:\python\run.py(5)<module>()
-> print(i)

It's worth noting that jumping to the for line will restart the loop.

  • That's a solution. Thank you very much! Though if anyone knows a solution just to execute a continue statement in the context, it would be even better. – Andor Feb 9 '15 at 16:53
9

You cannot use continue because new statements in the debugger need to be complete and valid without any other context; continue must be given inside a loop construct when being compiled. As such using !continue (with the ! to prevent pdb from interpreting the command) cannot be used even if the debugger is processing a loop construct.

You can use the j[ump] command, provided you have a later statement to jump to. If your loop is empty after the statements you wanted to jump over, you can only 'rewind':

$ bin/python test.py
> /.../test.py(5)<module>()
-> print(str(i))
(Pdb) l
  1     import pdb
  2     
  3     for i in range(10):
  4         pdb.set_trace()
  5  ->     print(str(i))
  6     
[EOF]
(Pdb) j 3
> /.../test.py(3)<module>()
-> for i in range(10):

j 3 jumped to line 3, not skipping anything; line 3 will be re-executed including setting up the range(). You could jump to line 4, but then the for loop doesn't advance.

You'd need to add another statement at the end of the loop to jump to for Python to continue from. That statement can be a print() or a pass or anything else that doesn't have to alter your state. You could even use continue as the last statement. I used i:

for i in range(10):
    pdb.set_trace()
    print(str(i))
    i  # only here to jump to.

Demo:

$ bin/python test.py
> /.../test.py(5)<module>()
-> print(str(i))
(Pdb) l
  1     import pdb
  2     
  3     for i in range(10):
  4         pdb.set_trace()
  5  ->     print(str(i))
  6         i  # only here to jump to.
  7     
[EOF]
(Pdb) j 6
> /.../test.py(6)<module>()
-> i  # only here to jump to.
(Pdb) c
> /.../test.py(4)<module>()
-> pdb.set_trace()
(Pdb) s
> /.../test.py(5)<module>()
-> print(str(i))
(Pdb) j 6
> /.../test.py(6)<module>()
-> i  # only here to jump to.
(Pdb) i
1
(Pdb) c
> /.../test.py(4)<module>()
-> pdb.set_trace()
(Pdb) s
> /.../test.py(5)<module>()
-> print(str(i))
(Pdb) j 6
> /.../test.py(6)<module>()
-> i  # only here to jump to.
(Pdb) i
2

From Debugger Commands:

j(ump) lineno
Set the next line that will be executed. Only available in the bottom-most frame. This lets you jump back and execute code again, or jump forward to skip code that you don’t want to run.

It should be noted that not all jumps are allowed — for instance it is not possible to jump into the middle of a for loop or out of a finally clause.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.