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How can i create a dataset with two columns having a specific correlation to each other? I want to be able to define the number of values which will be created and specify the correlation the output should have.

The question is similar to this one: Generate numbers with specific correlation

One of the answers was to use:

out <- mvrnorm(10, mu = c(0,0), Sigma = matrix(c(1,0.56,0.56,1),, ncol = 2), 
                mpirical = TRUE)

Producing an output like this:

            [,1]         [,2]
 [1,] -0.4152618  0.033311146
 [2,]  0.7617759 -0.181852441
 [3,] -1.6393045 -1.054752469
 [4,] -1.7872420 -0.605214425
 [5,]  0.9581152  2.511000955
 [6,]  0.5048160 -0.278329145
 [7,]  0.8656220  0.483521747
 [8,] -0.1385699  0.017395548
 [9,]  0.3261103 -0.932889606
[10,]  0.5639388  0.007808691

with the following correlation table cor(out):

     [,1] [,2]
[1,] 1.00 0.56
[2,] 0.56 1.00

But i want the data set to contain higher, no negative and more far away numbers for example:

       x   y
   1   5   5
   2  20  20
   3  30  30
   4 100 100

having a correlation of 1:

    x y
  x 1 1
  y 1 1

With more far away i mean "more" random and bigger in their value like in my sample above.

Is there are (easy) way to archive something like that?

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    "A key mathematical property of the Pearson correlation coefficient is that it is invariant to separate changes in location and scale in the two variables." => why don't you just scale out to put it in the desired range? – Jealie Feb 9 '15 at 18:52
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Correlation isn't affecting by linear transformation of the underlying variables. So the most direct way to get what you want could be:

out <- as.data.frame(mvrnorm(10, mu = c(0,0), 
                     Sigma = matrix(c(1,0.56,0.56,1),, ncol = 2), 
                     empirical = TRUE))

out$V1.s <- (out$V1 - min(out$V1))*1000+10
out$V2.s <- (out$V2 - min(out$V2))*200+30

Now the data frame out has "shifted" columns V1.s and V2.s which are non-negative and "large". You can use whatever numbers you want instead of 1000, 10, 200, and 30 in my code above. The answer for the correlation will still be 0.56.

> cor(out$V1.s, out$V2.s)
[1] 0.56
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  • Thanks a lot, it works as imaged! Do you perhaps know how i could archive something like that, but instead having just whole numbers (positive integer)? – Deset Feb 9 '15 at 19:10
  • 1
    Deset, if my answer was helpful please consider accepting or at least upvoting it. To make the numbers integers, I don't know of an exact method, but you could approximate the desired correlation coefficient by simply transforming to a large range and then rounding to the nearest integer. – Curt F. Feb 9 '15 at 19:53
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    note that rounding will slightly increase your variance (e.g. var(floor(rnorm(1000000))) is approximately 1.08 whereas var(rnorm(1000000)) is approximately 1. You may find this link helpful – Jthorpe Feb 9 '15 at 20:03
  • Thanks again rounding solved that issue. I thought it would change the correlation, but it seems with the number of values i need the change in the correlation is not crucial enough to make a difference. Jthorpe thanks for the notice and the link! – Deset Feb 9 '15 at 21:16
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Thanks Curt F. This was a help to me in generating some simulation data sets. I added some options to specify the approx. mean and range desired for X and Y. It also provides output so that you can check the slope and intercept as well as plotting the points and regression line.

library(MASS)
library(ggplot2)
# Desired correlation
d.cor <- 0.5
# Desired mean of X
d.mx <- 8
# Desired range of X
d.rangex <- 4
# Desired mean of Y
d.my <- 5
# Desired range of Y
d.rangey <- 2
# Calculations to create multipliation and addition factors for mean and range of X and Y
mx.factor <- d.rangex/6
addx.factor <- d.mx - (mx.factor*3)
my.factor <- d.rangey/6
addy.factor <- d.my - (my.factor*3)
# Generate data
out <- as.data.frame(mvrnorm(1000, mu = c(0,0), 
                             Sigma = matrix(c(1,d.cor,d.cor,1), ncol = 2), 
                             empirical = TRUE))
# Adjust so that values are positive and include factors to match desired means and ranges
out$V1.s <- (out$V1 - min(out$V1))*mx.factor + addx.factor
out$V2.s <- (out$V2 - min(out$V2))*my.factor + addy.factor
# Create liniear model to calculate intercept and slope
fit <- lm(out$V2.s ~ out$V1.s, data=out)
coef(fit)
# Plot scatterplot along with regression line
ggplot(out, aes(x=V1.s, y=V2.s)) + geom_point() + coord_fixed() + geom_smooth(method='lm')
# Produce summary table
summary(out)

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