23

I have a list of strings:

a = ['a', 'a', 'a', 'a', 'b', 'b', 'c', 'c', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'e', 'e', 'e', 'e']

I want to make a histogram for displaying the frequency distribution of the letters. I can make a list that contains the count of each letter using following codes:

from itertools import groupby
b = [len(list(group)) for key, group in groupby(a)]

How do I make the histogram? I may have a million such elements in list a.

  • 7
    from collections import Counter; histogram = Counter(text) – Joel Cornett Feb 9 '15 at 20:46
  • So what is histogram for you? – Eugene Sh. Feb 9 '15 at 20:46
  • first of all you should use Counter ... groupby will fail you for ['a','a','b','b','a'] (among other things) – Joran Beasley Feb 9 '15 at 20:46
  • 2
    possible duplicate of Making a histogram of string values in python – runDOSrun Feb 9 '15 at 20:47
  • btw you want a bar chart not a histogram for that. – runDOSrun Feb 9 '15 at 20:48
38

Very easy with Pandas.

import pandas
from collections import Counter
a = ['a', 'a', 'a', 'a', 'b', 'b', 'c', 'c', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'e', 'e', 'e', 'e']
letter_counts = Counter(a)
df = pandas.DataFrame.from_dict(letter_counts, orient='index')
df.plot(kind='bar')

Notice that Counter is making a frequency count, so our plot type is 'bar' not 'hist'.

histogram of letter counts

  • 1
    Cool, notconfusing! But how do you make continuous histogram? Do I just change kind = bar to kind = hist? – Gray Feb 9 '15 at 21:03
  • I have more than 1 million such elements in the list so I guess bar plot will have some difficulties to display frequencies. – Gray Feb 9 '15 at 21:14
  • @Gray, if you want to smooth it out I suggest kind='area' – notconfusing Feb 9 '15 at 23:10
  • 2
    Nice, although using a Series object instead of a DataFrame is maybe even simpler and avoids the spurious 0 in the plot: pandas.Series(Counter(a)).plot(kind='bar'). – jdehesa Aug 15 '17 at 10:49
11

here's a concise all-pandas approach:

a = ['a', 'a', 'a', 'a', 'b', 'b', 'c', 'c', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'e', 'e', 'e', 'e']
pd.Series(a).value_counts().plot('bar')

barplot of counts

  • 1
    This is the most concise answer. I would've generalized to data_frame.attribute_name.value_counts().plot.bar() – Roman Smirnov Dec 10 '18 at 15:35
9

As @notconfusing pointed above this can be solved with Pandas and Counter. If for any reason you need to not use Pandas you can get by with only matplotlib using the function in the following code:

from collections import Counter
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

a = ['a', 'a', 'a', 'a', 'b', 'b', 'c', 'c', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'e', 'e', 'e', 'e']
letter_counts = Counter(a)

def plot_bar_from_counter(counter, ax=None):
    """"
    This function creates a bar plot from a counter.

    :param counter: This is a counter object, a dictionary with the item as the key
     and the frequency as the value
    :param ax: an axis of matplotlib
    :return: the axis wit the object in it
    """

    if ax is None:
        fig = plt.figure()
        ax = fig.add_subplot(111)

    frequencies = counter.values()
    names = counter.keys()

    x_coordinates = np.arange(len(counter))
    ax.bar(x_coordinates, frequencies, align='center')

    ax.xaxis.set_major_locator(plt.FixedLocator(x_coordinates))
    ax.xaxis.set_major_formatter(plt.FixedFormatter(names))

    return ax

plot_bar_from_counter(letter_counts)
plt.show()

Which will produce enter image description here

6

Rather than use groupby() (which requires your input to be sorted), use collections.Counter(); this doesn't have to create intermediary lists just to count inputs:

from collections import Counter

counts = Counter(a)

You haven't really specified what you consider to be a 'histogram'. Lets assume you wanted to do this on the terminal:

width = 120  # Adjust to desired width
longest_key = max(len(key) for key in counts)
graph_width = width - longest_key - 2
widest = counts.most_common(1)[0][1]
scale = graph_width / float(widest)

for key, size in sorted(counts.items()):
    print('{}: {}'.format(key, int(size * scale) * '*'))

Demo:

>>> from collections import Counter
>>> a = ['a', 'a', 'a', 'a', 'b', 'b', 'c', 'c', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'e', 'e', 'e', 'e']
>>> counts = Counter(a)
>>> width = 120  # Adjust to desired width
>>> longest_key = max(len(key) for key in counts)
>>> graph_width = width - longest_key - 2
>>> widest = counts.most_common(1)[0][1]
>>> scale = graph_width / float(widest)
>>> for key, size in sorted(counts.items()):
...     print('{}: {}'.format(key, int(size * scale) * '*'))
... 
a: *********************************************************************************************
b: **********************************************
c: **********************************************************************
d: ***********************
e: *********************************************************************************************************************

More sophisticated tools are found in the numpy.histogram() and matplotlib.pyplot.hist() functions. These do the tallying for you, with matplotlib.pyplot.hist() also providing you with graph output.

  • Thank you Martijin! That is a smart way but how do I make printable graphs? – Gray Feb 9 '15 at 21:01
  • And how to use numpy.histogram() to solve this problem? Sorry, I am not a programmer. – Gray Feb 9 '15 at 21:05
  • @Gray: to be honest, I don't know nor do I have the time right now to find out. There are tutorials for the libraries, I suggest you go follow them! :-) – Martijn Pieters Feb 9 '15 at 21:23
  • Thank you very much for spending time on my question, Martijin! – Gray Feb 9 '15 at 21:35
1

Check out matplotlib.pyplot.bar. There is also numpy.histogram which is more flexible if you want wider bins.

0

Simple and effective way to make character histrogram in python

import numpy as np

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

from collections import Counter



a = []
count =0
d = dict()
filename = raw_input("Enter file name: ")
with open(filename,'r') as f:
    for word in f:
        for letter  in word:
            if letter not in d:
                d[letter] = 1
            else:
                d[letter] +=1
num = Counter(d)
x = list(num.values())
y = list(num.keys())

x_coordinates = np.arange(len(num.keys()))
plt.bar(x_coordinates,x)
plt.xticks(x_coordinates,y)
plt.show()
print x,y

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