12

I stumbled upon this code on Quora.

#include<stdio.h>

main(){
          int           $[]
        ={0x69,       0154,107,
     'e',0x79,0157, 117,'v',0x6a}
     ,_,__;_=__^__;__=_;while(_<(-
      (~(1<<3))+3)){(_==1<<1||_==
       -(~(1<<3))||_==11)?putchar
        (*($+(1>>1))):putchar(*(
          __++ +$)),(_==1>>1||
            _==1<<2||_==(1<<3
              )-1)?putchar
                (' '):1;
                  _++;
                    }
}

The program's output is i like you viji. It's touching, but cryptic. So I formatted it with indent to get a better idea.

main ()
{
  int $[] = { 0x69, 0154, 107,
    'e', 0x79, 0157, 117, 'v', 0x6a
  }
  , _, __;
  _ = __ ^ __;
  __ = _;
  while (_ < (-(~(1 << 3)) + 3))
    {
      (_ == 1 << 1 || _ ==
       -(~(1 << 3)) || _ == 11) ? putchar
(*($ + (1 >> 1))) : putchar (*(__++ + $)), (_ == 1 >> 1 ||
                                _ == 1 << 2 || _ == (1 << 3) - 1) ? putchar
(' ') : 1;
      _++;
    }
}

Now it's not so touching, but still a little cryptic.

So, can anybody explain how this code manages to print i like you viji?

UPDATE:

gave better names to variables $ , _ and __ and expanded ternary operators:

int a[] = { 0x69, 0154, 107, 'e', 0x79, 0157, 117, 'v', 0x6a }, x, y;

x = y ^ y;
y = x;

while (x < (-(~(1 << 3)) + 3))
  {
    if (x == 1 << 1 || x == -(~(1 << 3)) || x == 11)
      putchar (*(a + (1 >> 1)));
    else
      {
        putchar (*(y++ + a));
        if (x == 1 >> 1 || x == 1 << 2 || x == (1 << 3) - 1)
          putchar (' ');
        else
          1;
      }
    x++;
  }
  • 3
    try the following changes: use better variable names; simplify the constant expressions (e.g. 1<<3 - 1 is 7); expand ternary operator into if...else – M.M Feb 9 '15 at 20:49
  • I see _ = __ ^ __; even though __ has not been initialized. That falls under the category of undefined behavior. – R Sahu Feb 9 '15 at 20:54
  • 4
    @RSahu technically, perhaps. Although if you know how it works, anything XOR itself is guaranteed to result in 0. – inetknght Feb 9 '15 at 20:59
  • 3
    @inetknght that only applies to initialized values; uninitialized values may be different each time they are read. See here – M.M Feb 9 '15 at 21:04
  • 1
    I dont know whats with all these downvotes. This is a very on topic (and awesome) question. – David Grinberg Feb 9 '15 at 22:30
15

Rewriting the code gives:

int arr1[] = { 'i', 'l', 'k', 'e', 'y', 'o', 'u', 'v', 'j'};
int i0, i1;  // Moved to new line instead of using ,

i0 = 0;  // i0 = i1 ^ i1;
i1 = i0;

while (i0 < 12)  // All strange constant like (1<<3) recalculated
{
    if (i0 == 2 || i0 == 9 || i0 == 11)   // "? :" replaced by if 
    {
            putchar(*arr1);
    }
    else
    {
        putchar (*(arr1 + i1));
        ++i1;

        if (i0 == 0 || i0 == 4 || i0 == 7)
        {
            putchar(' ');
        }
    }
    i0++;
}

Step by step description:

1) Reformat the lines, remove unnecessary spaces, insert spaces for readability

main()
{
    int $[] = {0x69, 0154,107, 'e',0x79,0157, 117,'v',0x6a} , _, __;
    _ = __^__;
    __ = _;
    while(_ < (-(~(1<<3))+3))
    {
        (_ == 1<<1 || _ == -(~(1<<3)) || _ == 11) ?
                putchar(*($ + (1>>1))) :
                putchar(*(__++ +$)), (_ == 1 >> 1 || _ == 1<<2 || _ == (1<<3)-1) ?
                        putchar(' ') : 1;
        _++;
    }
}

2) Rename variable, i.e $ to arr1, _ to i0 and __ to i1

main()
{
    int arr1[] = {0x69, 0154,107, 'e',0x79,0157, 117,'v',0x6a} , i0, i1;
    i0 = i1^i1;
    i1 = i0;
    while(i0 < (-(~(1<<3))+3))
    {
        (i0==1<<1 || i0== -(~(1<<3)) || i0 == 11) ?
                putchar(*(arr1+(1>>1))) :
                putchar(*(i1++ +arr1)), (i0 == 1 >> 1 || i0 == 1<<2 || i0 == (1<<3)-1) ?
                        putchar(' ') : 1;
        i0++;
    }
}

3) Use if-statement instead of ?: This includes breaking the comma-line into two line.

main()
{
    int arr1[] = {0x69, 0154,107, 'e',0x79,0157, 117,'v',0x6a} , i0, i1;
    i0=i1^i1;
    i1=i0;
    while(i0 < (-(~(1<<3))+3))
    {
        if (i0 == 1<<1 ||i0== -(~(1<<3)) || i0 == 11)
        {
                putchar(*(arr1+(1>>1)));
        }
        else
        {
                putchar(*(i1++ +arr1));
                if (i0 == 1 >> 1 || i0 == 1<<2 || i0 == (1<<3)-1)
                {
                        putchar(' ');
                }
                else
                {
                    1;  // This does nothing so it can be removed
                }
        }
        i0++;
    }
}

4) Recalculate number-constant to better values Examples

0x69 is the same as 'i'

1 << 1 is the same as 2

-(~(1<<3)) is the same as 9

i1 ^ i1 is the same as 0

1>>1 is the same as 0

main()
{
    int arr1[] = { 'i', 'l', 'k', 'e', 'y', 'o', 'u', 'v', 'j'} , i0, i1;
    i0 = 0;
    i1 = i0;
    while(i0 < 12)
    {
        if (i0 == 2 || i0 == 9 || i0 == 11)
        {
                putchar(*(arr1));
        }
        else
        {
                putchar(*(i1++ +arr1));

                if (i0 == 0 || i0 == 4 || i0 == 7)
                {
                        putchar(' ');
                }
        }
        i0++;
    }
}

5) Some minor final clean up

main()
{
    int arr1[] = { 'i', 'l', 'k', 'e', 'y', 'o', 'u', 'v', 'j'};  // Move i0 and
                                                                  // i1 to nextt line
    int i0, i1;

    i0 = 0;
    i1 = i0;
    while(i0 < 12)
    {
        if (i0 == 2 || i0 == 9 || i0 == 11)
        {
                putchar(*arr1);
        }
        else
        {
                putchar(*(arr1 + i1));  // Splitted into two lines
                ++i1;

                if (i0 == 0 || i0 == 4 || i0 == 7)
                {
                        putchar(' ');
                }
        }
        i0++;
    }
}

Now the code is pretty easy to read.

  • Adding an explanation, the only duplicated letter is 'i' which the code inserts (*arr1), or a space, at the appropriate places. – Weather Vane Feb 9 '15 at 21:40
  • 1
    Well you posted the answer! – Weather Vane Feb 9 '15 at 21:50
  • i0 counts the letters (except spaces) in the output. i1 indexes the letters in the source array. At the appropriate points, the code either outputs an 'i' which has not appeared in the source array in sequence, by using the first array element *arr1, or it outputs the next letter from the source array and then, at the right places, outputs a space. – Weather Vane Feb 9 '15 at 21:55

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