-1

Let's say you have a block of text that you can include in your file using <?php echo $text_excerpt; ?> It's easy to just indent the first line of text, in a block of text.

To get a result that looks like

    Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vestibulum ut malesuada sem, in malesuada sapien. Vestibulum vitae posuere odio. Sed magna nisi, euismod sit amet euismod non, imperdiet vitae urna. Cras eu pulvinar neque. Suspendisse vestibulum fermentum quam, non consequat dolor auctor vel. Cras sed quam est.

all you need to do is write

<span style="text-indent: 50px;">
<?php echo $text_excerpt; ?>
</span>

or another method could be

<span>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
<?php echo $text_excerpt; ?>
</span>

However, let's say you want to get a result that looks like

     Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
    Vestibulum ut malesuada sem, in malesuada sapien. Vestibulum
  vitae posuere odio. Sed magna nisi, euismod sit amet euismod non,
imperdiet vitae urna. Cras eu pulvinar neque. Suspendisse vestibulum fermentum quam, non consequat dolor auctor vel. Cras sed quam est.

How can I do this WITHOUT modifying the contents of $text_excerpt; itself? It would be a terrible idea to try splitting the text into chunks. Or having to resort to exploding the different lines of text using Javascript after they are loaded. Or having to add <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; tags in the middle of my text. It would be impossible to do this manually for thousands of forum comments, for example. It would also not look good when the widow is resized, since there is no true text wrapping. How can this be done WITH wrapping and WITHOUT being so desperate as to use insane JS functions?

  • What are you trying to achieve here... are your trying to wrap text around a graphic element or something? – JRulle Feb 9 '15 at 20:59
  • @JRulle Not necessarily. This could be useful for a myriad of purposes. Maybe I want text that has a pretty wavy indent border. Or maybe I'm a strange person who likes double indents because they look fancy. Or maybe I want heart-shaped text for valentines and allows users to submit poems that will display as a heart. Or maybe I 'm going to make forums and I want every user's post to have a parabola-shaped space at the beginning, to separate each post from each other, as opposed to the traditional each-post-has-a-box-around-it separation method. – cake Feb 9 '15 at 21:07
  • 2
    You might want to look at CSS shapes, it's perfect for this kind of thing. It's currently supported by the latest versions of Safari, Chrome and Opera, so you don't get full browser support at the moment, but should degrade gracefully. – Dre Feb 9 '15 at 21:25
0

Depending on what browsers you need to support, CSS Shapes may be the right solution for you: DEMO

-webkit-shape-outside: polygon(0 0, 0 50%, 100% 0);
-webkit-clip-path: polygon(0 0, 0 50%, 100% 0);
0

This can be done without JS, yes, using just simple html/css. Little floating divs to block off the desired indents will do the trick.

<span class="text1" style="float:left; clear: left; width: 60px;">&nbsp;</span>
<span class="text1" style="float:left; clear: left; width: 40px;">&nbsp;</span>
<span class="text1" style="float:left; clear: left; width: 20px;">&nbsp;</span>

<span class="text1">
<?php echo $text_excerpt; ?>
</span>

<style>
.text1 { font-class: verdana; font-size: 10px; line-height: 10px; }
</style>

An important note is that these divs should be the same exact height as the text in your main span element. That's why they have identical 'text1' classes.

Another note is that without &nbsp;, the divs will be 0 pixels wide. They require a placeholder.

A final note - to make it look more understandable in the explanation, I've put the styles of the divs right inside the div. It is better to define the styles outside, and assign classes to each div instead, such as .first_line_indent, .second_line_indent, and .third_line_indent. That way, if you wish to change the styles in the future, you won't have to copy and paste the new CSS into thousands of indent divs.

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