2

I have a very long string, almost a megabyte long, that I need to write to a text file. The regular

file = open("file.txt","w")
file.write(string)
file.close()

works but is too slow, is there a way I can write faster?

I am trying to write a several million digit number to a text file the number is on the order of math.factorial(67867957)

This is what shows on profiling:

    203 function calls (198 primitive calls) in 0.001 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 <string>:1(<module>)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 re.py:217(compile)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 re.py:273(_compile)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 sre_compile.py:172(_compile_charset)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 sre_compile.py:201(_optimize_charset)
        4    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 sre_compile.py:25(_identityfunction)
      3/1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 sre_compile.py:33(_compile)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 sre_compile.py:341(_compile_info)
        2    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 sre_compile.py:442(isstring)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 sre_compile.py:445(_code)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 sre_compile.py:460(compile)
        5    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 sre_parse.py:126(__len__)
       12    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 sre_parse.py:130(__getitem__)
        7    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 sre_parse.py:138(append)
      3/1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 sre_parse.py:140(getwidth)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 sre_parse.py:178(__init__)
       10    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 sre_parse.py:183(__next)
        2    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 sre_parse.py:202(match)
        8    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 sre_parse.py:208(get)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 sre_parse.py:351(_parse_sub)
        2    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 sre_parse.py:429(_parse)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 sre_parse.py:67(__init__)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 sre_parse.py:726(fix_flags)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 sre_parse.py:738(parse)
        3    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 sre_parse.py:90(__init__)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {built-in method compile}
        1    0.001    0.001    0.001    0.001 {built-in method exec}
       17    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {built-in method isinstance}
    39/38    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {built-in method len}
        2    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {built-in method max}
        8    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {built-in method min}
        6    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {built-in method ord}
       48    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'append' of 'list' objects}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}
        5    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'find' of 'bytearray' objects}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'items' of 'dict' objects}
  • 6
    megabyte is not "huge". Are you sure your disk can work faster than python writes? Could your provide a standalone benchmark e.g., python3 -c'open('file', 'w').write("a"*1000000)' What time does it on your computer? What is the desired time? – jfs Feb 9 '15 at 22:27
  • 5
    lol there is no way it should take hours to write 1 MB ... it should take at most a few seconds (and thats being generous) ... as @J.F.Sebastian mentions please profile it with something simple... – Joran Beasley Feb 9 '15 at 22:30
  • 3
    What does your profiling show? docs.python.org/2/library/profile.html – user559633 Feb 9 '15 at 22:48
  • 4
    /usr/bin/time python -c'import gmpy2; open("/tmp/file", "w").write(str(gmpy2.fac(67867957)))' takes less than 10 minutes on my machine. /tmp/file contains 500M digits number – jfs Feb 9 '15 at 23:32
  • 2
    As answered by @J.F.Sebastian, the fundamental issue is that str(long) has quadratic running time. I am biased since I maintain gmpy2, but if you plan to work with such huge numbers, you really should be using 'gmpy2. BTW, the current development version (2.1.x) includes the primorial` function. gmpy2.primorial(67867957) takes about 3.5 seconds. – casevh Feb 13 '15 at 8:07
2

Your issue is that str(long) is very slow for large intergers (millions of digits) in Python. It is a quadratic operation (in number of digits) in Python i.e., for ~1e8 digits it may require ~1e16 operations to convert the integer to a decimal string.

Writing to a file 500MB should not take hours e.g.:

$ python3 -c 'open("file", "w").write("a"*500*1000000)'

returns almost immediately. ls -l file confirms that the file is created and it has the expected size.

Calculating math.factorial(67867957) (the result has ~500M digits) may take several hours but saving it using pickle is instantaneous:

import math
import pickle

n = math.factorial(67867957) # takes a long time
with open("file.pickle", "wb") as file:
    pickle.dump(n, file) # very fast (comparatively)

To load it back using n = pickle.load(open('file.pickle', 'rb')) takes less than a second.

str(n) is still running (after 50 hours) on my machine.

To get the decimal representation fast, you could use gmpy2:

$ python -c'import gmpy2;open("file.gmpy2", "w").write(str(gmpy2.fac(67867957)))'

It takes less than 10 minutes on my machine.

0

ok this is really not an answer it is more to prove your reasoning for the delay wrong

first test write speed of a big string

 import timeit
 def write_big_str(n_bytes=1000000):
     with open("test_file.txt","wb") as f:
          f.write("a"*n_bytes)
 print timeit.timeit("write_big_str()","from __main__ import write_big_str",number=100)

you should see a fairly respectable speed (and thats to repeat it 100 times)

next we will see how long it takes to convert a very big number to a str

import timeit,math
n = math.factorial(200000)
print timeit.timeit("str(n)","from __main__ import n",number=1)

it will probably take ~10seconds (and that is a million digit number) , which granted is slow ... but not hours slow (ok its pretty slow to convert to string :P... but still shouldnt take hours) (well it took more like 243 seconds for my box i guess :P)

  • Here is the thing, 200000! looks tiny compared to the number I'm writing. My number is a bit smaller than 67867957! The python had no problem writing 49979687# (# is symbol for primorial) which is approximately 49979687! – João Areias Feb 9 '15 at 23:02
  • 1
    ahh now we are starting to get helpful data ... indeed the string conversion may take a looooong time ... also that has alot more than a million digits ... – Joran Beasley Feb 9 '15 at 23:02
  • 3
    @JoãoAreias 67867957! is about 500 million decimal digits in length, i.e. we're talking about ~500 MB, not 1 MB. – senshin Feb 9 '15 at 23:04
  • Oh, sorry my mistake. I read it wrong when I was going to write here, is not 1MB is more like 100, primorial still smaller than factorial(even though still huge) is there any way of speeding up the process or do I just have to wait and deal with it? – João Areias Feb 9 '15 at 23:06
  • oh well yeah 100Million digit number will take a while to convert to a string ... – Joran Beasley Feb 9 '15 at 23:07

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