73

I wonder, how to save and load numpy.array data properly. Currently I'm using the numpy.savetxt() method. For example, if I got an array markers, which looks like this:

enter image description here

I try to save it by the use of:

numpy.savetxt('markers.txt', markers)

In other script I try to open previously saved file:

markers = np.fromfile("markers.txt")

And that's what I get...

enter image description here

Saved data first looks like this:

0.000000000000000000e+00
0.000000000000000000e+00
0.000000000000000000e+00
0.000000000000000000e+00
0.000000000000000000e+00
0.000000000000000000e+00
0.000000000000000000e+00
0.000000000000000000e+00
0.000000000000000000e+00
0.000000000000000000e+00

But when I save just loaded data by the use of the same method, ie. numpy.savetxt() it looks like this:

1.398043286095131769e-76
1.398043286095288860e-76
1.396426376485745879e-76
1.398043286055061908e-76
1.398043286095288860e-76
1.182950697433698368e-76
1.398043275797188953e-76
1.398043286095288860e-76
1.210894289234927752e-99
1.398040649781712473e-76

What am I doing wrong? PS there are no other "backstage" operation which I perform. Just saving and loading, and that's what I get. Thank you in advance.

  • What's the output of the text file? Why not just write to a CSV file? – user554546 Feb 10 '15 at 19:05
  • 2
    Do you need to save and load as human-readable text files? It will be faster (and the files will be more compact) if you save/load binary files using np.save() and np.load(). – ali_m Feb 10 '15 at 19:11
  • Thank you for your advice. It helped. However, can you explain why it is what it is, and if there is any way to allow saving data in *.txt format and loading it without headache? For example, when one want to work with matlab, java, or other tools/languages. – bluevoxel Feb 10 '15 at 19:14
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    To pass arrays to/from MATLAB you can use scipy.io.savemat and scipy.io.loadmat. – ali_m Feb 10 '15 at 19:24
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    The default for fromfile is to read the data as binary. loadtxt is the correct pairing with savetxt. Look at the function documentation. – hpaulj Feb 10 '15 at 19:40
111

The most reliable way I have found to do this is to use np.savetxt with np.loadtxt and not np.fromfile which is better suited to binary files written with tofile. The np.fromfile and np.tofile methods write and read binary files whereas np.savetxt writes a text file. So, for example:

In [1]: a = np.array([1, 2, 3, 4])
In [2]: np.savetxt('test1.txt', a, fmt='%d')
In [3]: b = np.loadtxt('test1.txt', dtype=int)
In [4]: a == b
Out[4]: array([ True,  True,  True,  True], dtype=bool)

Or:

In [5]: a.tofile('test2.dat')
In [6]: c = np.fromfile('test2.dat', dtype=int)
In [7]: c == a
Out[7]: array([ True,  True,  True,  True], dtype=bool)

I use the former method even if it is slower and creates bigger files (sometimes): the binary format can be platform dependent (for example, the file format depends on the endianness of your system).

There is a platform independent format for NumPy arrays, which can be saved and read with np.save and np.load:

In  [8]: np.save('test3.npy', a)    # .npy extension is added if not given
In  [9]: d = np.load('test3.npy')
In [10]: a == d
Out[10]: array([ True,  True,  True,  True], dtype=bool)
  • 33
    .npy files (e.g. generated by np.save()) are platform-independent, and will be more compact and faster to create than text files. – ali_m Feb 10 '15 at 20:05
  • 2
    also np.savez if you want the output compressed. – tegan May 17 '18 at 14:49
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    @tegan np.savez saves several arrays uncompressed - np.savez_compressed will compress them - there's no np.save_compressed yet. See docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy-1.15.1/reference/routines.io.html – Brian Burns Oct 9 '18 at 14:57
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    Thanks xnx I was having the same issue (with dtype float) using np.savetxt with np.loadtxt solved it – Yogesh Oct 24 '18 at 6:21
  • I had issue with pickle saving data greater than 2GB. Thanks to xnx the problem solved by using a.tofile and np.fromfile. – Azhar hussain Aug 25 at 5:21
17
np.save('data.npy', num_arr) # save
new_num_arr = np.load('data.npy') # load
3

np.fromfile() has a sep= keyword argument:

Separator between items if file is a text file. Empty (“”) separator means the file should be treated as binary. Spaces (” ”) in the separator match zero or more whitespace characters. A separator consisting only of spaces must match at least one whitespace.

The default value of sep="" means that np.fromfile() tries to read it as a binary file rather than a space-separated text file, so you get nonsense values back. If you use np.fromfile('markers.txt', sep=" ") you will get the result you are looking for.

However, as others have pointed out, np.loadtxt() is the preferred way to convert text files to numpy arrays, and unless the file needs to be human-readable it is usually better to use binary formats instead (e.g. np.load()/np.save()).

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