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It is well known that usual Akka actors provide at-most-once delivery semantics. On the other side akka-persistence provides also at-least-once delivery semantics, the later requiring more boilerplate and a few differences when implementing (i.e., taking care of sequence numbers to avoid receiving or sending again once delivery is confirmed).

Now suppose you have some big enterprise application handling plenty of critical transactions (some bank, for example). This transactions are modelled internally as specific message flows between the actors that compose the system (potentially deployed in multiple machines).

So, if the lost of a single message in the aforementioned message flows implies that the transaction fails or it is silently discarded, does this situation forces the implementation to use at-least-once delivery with all the boilerplate EVERYWHERE? Wouldn't this make the code base kind of cumbersome to maintain? How to handle this kind of situations efficiently in terms of the balance of code maintainability and overall system performance? How to minimize in general the use of at-least-once delivery in a safe way?

Thanks a lot.

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So, if the lost of a single message in the aforementioned message flows implies that the transaction fails or it is silently discarded, does this situation forces the implementation to use at-least-once delivery with all the boilerplate EVERYWHERE? Wouldn't this make the code base kind of cumbersome to maintain? How to handle this kind of situations efficiently in terms of the balance of code maintainability and overall system performance? How to minimize in general the use of at-least-once delivery in a safe way?<

You will never do this. In a banking system you hardly would find actors. In a banking system you will find two or three level implementations to ensure that each transaction went through.

For the at least once approach vs. at most once approach is basically a difference in the timeout and the way you think about the message. At most one is about to maximize throughput (if something goes south you have timeouts to kick in on the low level).

At least once takes a different route (depending on the underlying implementation). Here you aim to shorten response times. It is much more likely to send it to three servers prio and take the fastest response.

Think about a billing service vs. a search service. In a billing service you dont care about response time that much and want to ensure that a person is only billed once. So you want a process to finish before you ask another node to take over and do the billing. For a search service you want to have fast response time. So you send the search request to lets say three servers and they search in parallel and you take the first result being reported by any (!) server.

So thats the reason. At least once and at most once is about correctness vs. response. (thats at least how we learned it).

[Update]

If you measure real performance and you find that your servers response in 75% within 25ms and in 95% within 75ms, your implementation for at least once will most likely wait for 25ms and send the request to another server and wait for 50 more ms to send a third request. So with this you add only 30% (just a guess) to shorten the expected response time down to 75% 25ms, 95% to 50ms and 99% to 75ms (in an ideal world where each request requires same computation time and the difference in processing time are architecture depending (or single node depending) and not network depending (times of heavy load etc).

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