112

I want to delete the first character from a string. So far, the most succinct thing I've come up with is:

display.text = display.text!.substringFromIndex(advance(display.text!.startIndex, 1))

I know we can't index into a string with an Int because of Unicode, but this solution seems awfully verbose. Is there another way that I'm overlooking?

  • 3
    Actually you can avoid the whole advance thing by casting display.text! to NSString. I'm not saying that's a good solution - just correcting a possible misconception. With NSString, you can index into it with Int. - And the reason you can't index with Int is not because of Unicode; it's because a Character can consist of multiple compound codepoints. – matt Feb 11 '15 at 3:40
  • If your doing this in order to capitalise the String then Swift 3 has introduced the capitalized function to String. – Vince O'Sullivan Mar 27 '17 at 11:43

13 Answers 13

199

If you're using Swift 3, you can ignore the second section of this answer. Good news is, this is now actually succinct again! Just using String's new remove(at:) method.

var myString = "Hello, World"
myString.remove(at: myString.startIndex)

myString // "ello, World"

I like the global dropFirst() function for this.

let original = "Hello" // Hello
let sliced = dropFirst(original) // ello

It's short, clear, and works for anything that conforms to the Sliceable protocol.

If you're using Swift 2, this answer has changed. You can still use dropFirst, but not without dropping the first character from your strings characters property and then converting the result back to a String. dropFirst has also become a method, not a function.

let original = "Hello" // Hello
let sliced = String(original.characters.dropFirst()) // ello

Another alternative is to use the suffix function to splice the string's UTF16View. Of course, this has to be converted back to a String afterwards as well.

let original = "Hello" // Hello
let sliced = String(suffix(original.utf16, original.utf16.count - 1)) // ello

All this is to say that the solution I originally provided has turned out not to be the most succinct way of doing this in newer versions of Swift. I recommend falling back on @chris' solution using removeAtIndex() if you're looking for a short and intuitive solution.

var original = "Hello" // Hello
let removedChar = original.removeAtIndex(original.startIndex)

original // ello

And as pointed out by @vacawama in the comments below, another option that doesn't modify the original String is to use substringFromIndex.

let original = "Hello" // Hello
let substring = original.substringFromIndex(advance(original.startIndex, 1)) // ello

Or if you happen to be looking to drop a character off the beginning and end of the String, you can use substringWithRange. Just be sure to guard against the condition when startIndex + n > endIndex - m.

let original = "Hello" // Hello

let newStartIndex = advance(original.startIndex, 1)
let newEndIndex = advance(original.endIndex, -1)

let substring = original.substringWithRange(newStartIndex..<newEndIndex) // ell

The last line can also be written using subscript notation.

let substring = original[newStartIndex..<newEndIndex]
  • 2
    And it doesn't require you to step into the Foundation world. – matt Feb 11 '15 at 3:38
  • 2
    And it is very much swift/fp. – David Berry Feb 11 '15 at 4:00
  • Thanks, that's much more elegant. I've been programming in Objective C for years and am taking the iTunes U Stanford iOS programming course in Swift. I still have lots to learn about the new paradigm. – SSteve Feb 13 '15 at 19:11
  • 1
    Keep in mind while using dropLast or dropFirst, unwrap the string otherwise it'll not work. – Bhavuk Jain Mar 4 '16 at 14:02
  • 3
    Great answer! I think it's worth noting the return value of the remove(at:) method: it's the character removed, not the new string. For example, let removedCharacter = myString.remove(at: myString.startIndex). I was making the mistake of returning the result of the method call, forgetting that this was the case in this approach. Happy coding all! – kbpontius Sep 16 '16 at 23:39
111

Update for Swift 4

In Swift 4, String conforms to Collection again, so it is possible to use dropFirst and dropLast to trim the beginnings and ends of strings. The result is of type Substring, so you need to pass that to the String constructor to get back a String:

let str = "hello"
let result1 = String(str.dropFirst())    // "ello"
let result2 = String(str.dropLast())     // "hell"

dropFirst() and dropLast() also take an Int to specify the number of characters to drop:

let result3 = String(str.dropLast(3))    // "he"
let result4 = String(str.dropFirst(4))   // "o"

If you specify more characters to drop than are in the string, the result will be the empty string ("").

let result5 = String(str.dropFirst(10))  // ""

Update for Swift 3

If you just want to remove the first character and want to change the original string in place, then see @MickMacCallum's answer. If you want to create a new string in the process, use substring(from:). With an extension to String, you can hide the ugliness of substring(from:) and substring(to:) to create useful additions to trim the start and ends of a String:

extension String {
    func chopPrefix(_ count: Int = 1) -> String {
        return substring(from: index(startIndex, offsetBy: count))
    }

    func chopSuffix(_ count: Int = 1) -> String {
        return substring(to: index(endIndex, offsetBy: -count))
    }
}

"hello".chopPrefix()    // "ello"
"hello".chopPrefix(3)   // "lo"

"hello".chopSuffix()    // "hell"
"hello".chopSuffix(3)   // "he"

Like dropFirst and dropLast before them, these functions will crash if there aren't enough letters available in the String. The onus is on the caller to use them properly. This is a valid design decision. One could write them to return an optional which then would have to be unwrapped by the caller.


Swift 2.x

Alas in Swift 2, dropFirst and dropLast (the previous best solution) aren't as convenient as they were before. With an extension to String, you can hide the ugliness of substringFromIndex and substringToIndex:

extension String {
    func chopPrefix(count: Int = 1) -> String {
         return self.substringFromIndex(advance(self.startIndex, count))
    }

    func chopSuffix(count: Int = 1) -> String {
        return self.substringToIndex(advance(self.endIndex, -count))
    }
}

"hello".chopPrefix()    // "ello"
"hello".chopPrefix(3)   // "lo"

"hello".chopSuffix()    // "hell"
"hello".chopSuffix(3)   // "he"

Like dropFirst and dropLast before them, these functions will crash if there aren't enough letters available in the String. The onus is on the caller to use them properly. This is a valid design decision. One could write them to return an optional which then would have to be unwrapped by the caller.


In Swift 1.2, you'll need to call chopPrefix like this:

"hello".chopPrefix(count: 3)  // "lo"

or you can add an underscore _ to the function definitions to suppress the parameter name:

extension String {
    func chopPrefix(_ count: Int = 1) -> String {
         return self.substringFromIndex(advance(self.startIndex, count))
    }

    func chopSuffix(_ count: Int = 1) -> String {
        return self.substringToIndex(advance(self.endIndex, -count))
    }
}
  • 3
    I'm still blown away by how complicated Swift's built-in string manipulation is. I mean this is basic, basic stuff; it should not look like I'm implementing a parser. Thanks for the extension to simplify this. It's baffling Apple wouldn't just add this to the String class! Maybe it's still in a lot of flux. – devios1 Feb 22 '16 at 21:57
  • This is what they call "evolution" kids. It would be hilarious if we didn't have to deal with it every day. I know there are reasons for the String API being the way it is but, really truly, this must put off so many potential converts to this language. The previous commenter is absolutely right - this should be basic, basic stuff. – Quintin Willison Nov 1 '17 at 11:13
16

Swift 2.2

'advance' is unavailable: call the 'advancedBy(n)' method on the index

    func chopPrefix(count: Int = 1) -> String {
        return self.substringFromIndex(self.startIndex.advancedBy(count))
    }

    func chopSuffix(count: Int = 1) -> String {
        return self.substringFromIndex(self.endIndex.advancedBy(count))
    }

Swift 3.0

    func chopPrefix(_ count: Int = 1) -> String {
        return self.substring(from: self.characters.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: count))
    }

    func chopSuffix(_ count: Int = 1) -> String {
       return self.substring(to: self.characters.index(self.endIndex, offsetBy: -count))
    }

Swift 3.2

A view of the string's contents as a collection of characters.

@available(swift, deprecated: 3.2, message: "Please use String or Substring directly")
public var characters: String.CharacterView
func chopPrefix(_ count: Int = 1) -> String {
    if count >= 0 && count <= self.count {
        return self.substring(from: String.Index(encodedOffset: count))
    }
    return ""
}

func chopSuffix(_ count: Int = 1) -> String {
    if count >= 0 && count <= self.count {
        return self.substring(to: String.Index(encodedOffset: self.count - count))
    }
    return ""
}

Swift 4

extension String {

    func chopPrefix(_ count: Int = 1) -> String {
        if count >= 0 && count <= self.count {
            let indexStartOfText = self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: count)
            return String(self[indexStartOfText...])
        }
        return ""
    }

    func chopSuffix(_ count: Int = 1) -> String {
        if count >= 0 && count <= self.count {
            let indexEndOfText = self.index(self.endIndex, offsetBy: -count)
            return String(self[..<indexEndOfText])
        }
        return ""
    }
}
  • 1
    i think you forgot to add the negation -count to the chopSuffix function – Andy Jun 30 '16 at 4:10
12

In Swift 2, do this:

let cleanedString = String(theString.characters.dropFirst())

I recommend https://www.mikeash.com/pyblog/friday-qa-2015-11-06-why-is-swifts-string-api-so-hard.html to get an understanding of Swift strings.

8

Depends on what what you want the end result to be (mutating vs nonmutating).

As of Swift 4.1:

Mutating:

var str = "hello"
str.removeFirst() // changes str 

Nonmutating:

let str = "hello"
let strSlice = str.dropFirst() // makes a slice without the first letter
let str2 = String(strSlice)

Notes:

  • I put an extra step in the nonmutating example for clarity. Subjectively, combining the last two steps would be more succinct.
  • The naming of dropFirst seems a bit odd to me because if I am understanding the Swift API Design Guidelines correctly, dropFirst should really be something like dropingFirst because it is nonmutating. Just a thought :).
  • 1
    indeed, it should be droppingFirst - they messed up! – Fattie Jan 28 at 19:28
6

What about this?

s.removeAtIndex(s.startIndex)

This of course assumes that your string is mutable. It returns the character which has been removed, but alters the original string.

6

The previous answers are pretty good, but as of today, I think this may be the most succinct way to remove the first character from a string in Swift 4:

var line: String = "This is a string..."
var char: Character? = nil

char = line.removeFirst()

print("char = \(char)")  // char = T
print("line = \(line)")  // line = his is a string ...
1

I know of nothing more succinct out of the box, but you could easily implement prefix ++, e.g.,

public prefix func ++ <I: ForwardIndexType>(index: I) -> I {
    return advance(index, 1)
}

After which you can use it to your heart's content very succinctly:

str.substringFromIndex(++str.startIndex)
1

In Swift 2 use this String extension:

extension String
{
    func substringFromIndex(index: Int) -> String
    {
        if (index < 0 || index > self.characters.count)
        {
            print("index \(index) out of bounds")
            return ""
        }
        return self.substringFromIndex(self.startIndex.advancedBy(index))
    }
}

display.text = display.text!.substringFromIndex(1)
1

"en_US,fr_CA,es_US".chopSuffix(5).chopPrefix(5) // ",fr_CA,"

extension String {
    func chopPrefix(count: Int = 1) -> String {
        return self.substringFromIndex(self.startIndex.advancedBy(count))
    }

    func chopSuffix(count: Int = 1) -> String {
        return self.substringToIndex(self.endIndex.advancedBy(-count))
    }
}
0

To remove first character from string

let choppedString = String(txtField.text!.characters.dropFirst())
  • @JasonFoglia i don't know that you give down vote or not. if you give down vote then can you please explain in detail. – Hardik Thakkar Mar 29 '17 at 10:44
  • I re-checked this and found that it is correct. I edited the answer so I can properly vote up on this. – Jason Foglia Apr 1 '17 at 16:54
0

Here is a Swift4 crash save version of the chopPrefix extension, leaving chopSuffix to the community ...

extension String {
    func chopPrefix(_ count: Int = 1) -> String {
        return count>self.count ? self : String(self[index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: count)...])
    }
 }
0

Swift3

extension String {
    func chopPrefix(_ count: UInt = 1) -> String {
        return substring(from: characters.index(startIndex, offsetBy: Int(count)))
    }

    func chopSuffix(_ count: UInt = 1) -> String {
        return substring(to: characters.index(endIndex, offsetBy: -Int(count)))
    }
}

class StringChopTests: XCTestCase {
    func testPrefix() {
        XCTAssertEqual("original".chopPrefix(0), "original")
        XCTAssertEqual("Xfile".chopPrefix(), "file")
        XCTAssertEqual("filename.jpg".chopPrefix(4), "name.jpg")
    }

    func testSuffix() {
        XCTAssertEqual("original".chopSuffix(0), "original")
        XCTAssertEqual("fileX".chopSuffix(), "file")
        XCTAssertEqual("filename.jpg".chopSuffix(4), "filename")
    }
}
  • I think you should add a test where the input is in a negative value – Moustafa Baalbaki Oct 13 '18 at 5:16

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.