2

I'm developing a PHP class, RequestSanitize, that will process some raw user input. One way I could do it is:

class DataSanitizer implements DataSanitizerInterface {
    protected $_schema;

    public function __construct($schema){
        $this->_schema = $schema;
        // Blah blah blah
    }

    public function sanitize($data) {
        $sanitizedData = [];

        // Blah blah blah populate $sanitizedData

         ...
        return $sanitizedData;
    }
}

So, basically the class just serves to serve up the schema whenever sanitize is called. Thus, it would get used like this:

$ds = new DataSanitizer("/path/to/schema");
$sanitizedData = $ds->sanitize($_GET);

In this case, I could probably even make sanitize a static member.

Another option would be:

class DataSanitizer implements DataSanitizerInterface {
    protected $_schema;
    protected $_sanitizedData = [];

    public function __construct($schema){
        $this->_schema = $schema;
        // Blah blah blah
    }

    public function sanitize($data) {
        // Blah blah blah

        $this->_sanitizedData = ...
        return $this;
    }

    public function data(){
        return $this->_sanitizedData;
    }
}

Which would get used like this:

$ds = new DataSanitizer("/path/to/schema");
$ds->sanitize($_GET);
$sanitizedData = $ds->data();

In terms of both immediate design, and future extendability, does one design pattern make more sense than the other? Or, is there a third, possibly better design pattern I should use?

1

I prefer option #1. It's cleaner and easier to use IMO, and option #2 doesn't provide any benefit or functionality over the 1st.

Thinking about it at a higher level, encapsulation is used to hide data and implementation details leveraged to accomplish the task defined in the class. In option #2, you're not really hiding implementation details, you're essentially asking the class to store something for you that isn't necessary, under the guise of "encapsulation".

If you were in a multi-threaded environment, option #1 would also allow easier reuse of your object across threads. That's making a lot of assumptions about the reentrant nature of the things your using to actually do the sanitation, but #2 essentially leaves you creating sanitation objects for each thread, again to store data that not necessary or core to the function of the class.

0

From my point of view, if you use the interface class, you can define attributes and functions at the interface. Because interface can be implemented from more than one class. If it is like this, the method 1 should be more convenient for this.

If you may use only class and not implement from other interface, it would be better if you use method 2.

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