I have a timestamp in a mysql table with attribute "ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP". Is there a way to manually disable updating the timestamp on a special occasion? (eg: updating the entry to revise a blog post, but not to re-date it)

up vote 44 down vote accepted

Is there a way to manually disable updating the timestamp on a special occasion? (eg: updating the entry to revise a blog post, but not to re-date it)

Sounds like you need to configure the default constraint so that it populates the column on insertion only:

DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP

Changing it to only be this means that any revisions will not trigger the timestamp value to be updated. IE: If you created the blogpost yesterday, and corrected a typo today - the date in the column would still be for yesterday.

  • Can you show an SQL statement for updating the field for others, I figured it out for myself? – a coder Sep 9 '14 at 2:25
  • What if i want to update the last_updated field (keep ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP behaviour) as usual except if update was made only on one particular column? Actually I'm modelling a meta-data db to persist information of certain crons (their source, sink, last_completion_time). So I the last_updated field must be updated only when the cron was actually modified (and not when cron's last_completion_time field was updated) – y2k-shubham Sep 26 at 12:46

You can manually set the value of the column to its current value in the update command:

UPDATE table SET x=y, timestampColumn=timestampColumn WHERE a=b;

If you don't set the value in the query, it will be updated to the current timestamp as per the table definition.

  • Although this works, this approach is slower than removing the rule about updating the value. – Mikhail Jun 3 '12 at 20:19
  • 12
    "slower" - how much? Longer than it takes the OP to remove the magic ON UPDATE, add NOW() to all his other queries and retest his app? – Andy Jun 4 '12 at 11:35
  • How much slower depends on the number of rows you're updating. If you're working with system logs with literally millions of rows then it's not just slow -- it's slow every time you run that query. I'm not suggesting removing DEFAULT value; just the ON UPDATE – Mikhail Jun 4 '12 at 14:38
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    Thank you, this is just what I needed. I have table "blogposts" and when I update view count it updates the "datetime_edited" (on update timestamp) column. On every other occasion I need "datetime_edited" field updated - title or description changes, new image upload etc. – fsasvari Oct 9 '15 at 9:04
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    I wish I could upvote this more than once! I didn't even know you could refer to a column in the record in an update statement! A whole new world! – samson Sep 21 '16 at 19:00

To make your table/timestamp auto-update:

ALTER TABLE myTable
CHANGE myTimestampColumn
        myTimestampColumn TIMESTAMP NOT NULL
                       DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP 
                       ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP;

To make it not auto-update:

ALTER TABLE myTable
CHANGE myTimestampColumn
        myTimestampColumn TIMESTAMP NOT NULL
                       DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP;

NOTE: The "default current_timestamp" part just sets it to the current stamp at default time, since the field is not-null. You can remove both the not null and the default, if you like.

don't use timestamps, but track times manually.

if you really want to update a record and don't update it's timestamp use:

UPDATE `table` SET `timestamp` = `timestamp`, `col` = 'new data' …;
  • 11
    "don't use timestamps", why? – Petah Jan 14 '13 at 23:37
  • I would like an answer to @Petah's question, too... – ryvantage May 3 '14 at 22:41
  • 3
    They can only represent times from 1.1.1970 to 31.12.2037; only the first timestamp column is automatically updated; when restoring from a backup timestamps are adjusted to the local timezone. And, depending on your application, you might not want to have that column updated when running an sql update statement in your backand (you only want the timestamp updated when using your frontend to edit data) – knittl May 4 '14 at 6:33
  • Timestamps are explicitly intended to track PRESENT times, so there's no problem with it having limited range of values. "Only first column" is not a problem either, and assuming you are using at least MySQL 4.1.3, local timezone is not an issue, if you've used mysqldump for backup. – AnrDaemon Nov 13 '17 at 12:19
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    Adding to what @AnrDaemon states, I'm sure we'll get support for date ranges beyond 2037 long before we approach that cut off, and transitioning historical data to the new timestamp format should be very easy (if not automatic). Also, MySQL has supported multiple timestamp columns at least since v5.6.10 was released in early 2013. And if you don't want a timestamp value to update when a record is updated, then don't specify ON UPDATE... – nextgentech Mar 31 at 1:29

If you do change timestemp on update then you have to take into your consideration that if the value was updated but not changed (updated the save value) then it will not update the "on update Current_timestemp" and on this situation you should set the timestemp manually

SET LastUpdatedDate=NOW() WHERE

The idea came from here: Touch MYSQL record to update TIMESTAMP field

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