159

What is the meaning of

{...this.props}

I am trying to use it like that

 <div {...this.props}> Content Here </div>

7 Answers 7

254

It's called spread attributes and its aim is to make the passing of props easier.

Let us imagine that you have a component that accepts N number of properties. Passing these down can be tedious and unwieldy if the number grows.

<Component x={} y={} z={} />

So instead do this, wrap them up in an object and use the spread notation

var props = { x: 1, y: 1, z:1 };
<Component {...props} />

which will unpack it into the props on your component, i.e., you "never" use {... props} inside your render() function, only when you pass the props down to another component. Use your unpacked props as normal this.props.x.

2
  • 4
    Just to add, it can help to think of it as a replacement to this.transferPropsTo which was deprecated in React 0.12.x and will be removed in 0.13.x. It of course allows much more advanced usage however simply translating React 0.11.x's this.transferPropsTo(<Foo />) to <Foo {...this.props} /> is most useful for people making that transition. Feb 11, 2015 at 14:53
  • 22
    Good awnser, but 'you "never" use {... props} inside your render() function, only when you pass the props down to another component.' Is a very confusing term of phrase. Recommend to rewrite is as "You only use {... props} inside your render() when you pass the props down to another component." for clarity.
    – Dani
    Oct 12, 2017 at 21:14
27

It's ES6 Spread_operator and Destructuring_assignment.

<div {...this.props}>
  Content Here
</div>

It's equal to Class Component

const person = {
    name: "xgqfrms",
    age: 23,
    country: "China"
};

class TestDemo extends React.Component {
    render() {
        const {name, age, country} = {...this.props};
        // const {name, age, country} = this.props;
        return (
          <div>
              <h3> Person Information: </h3>
              <ul>
                <li>name={name}</li>
                <li>age={age}</li>
                <li>country={country}</li>
              </ul>
          </div>
        );
    }
}

ReactDOM.render(
    <TestDemo {...person}/>
    , mountNode
);

enter image description here


or Function component

const props = {
    name: "xgqfrms",
    age: 23,
    country: "China"
};

const Test = (props) => {
  return(
    <div
        name={props.name}
        age={props.age}
        country={props.country}>
        Content Here
        <ul>
          <li>name={props.name}</li>
          <li>age={props.age}</li>
          <li>country={props.country}</li>
        </ul>
    </div>
  );
};

ReactDOM.render(
    <div>
        <Test {...props}/>
        <hr/>
        <Test 
            name={props.name}
            age={props.age}
            country={props.country}
        />
    </div>
    , mountNode
);

enter image description here

refs

0
2

It will compile to this:

React.createElement('div', this.props, 'Content Here');

As you can see above, it passes all it's props to the div.

2

It is ES-6 feature. It means you extract all the properties of props in div.{... }

operator is used to extract properties of an object.

2

You will use props in your child component

for example

if your now component props is

{
   booking: 4,
   isDisable: false
}

you can use this props in your child compoenet

 <div {...this.props}> ... </div>

in you child component, you will receive all your parent props.

1
  • Good answer but would be even better if you included an explanation about what props are for.
    – Mike Poole
    Jul 12, 2019 at 14:23
1

this.props is the object which contains the Attributes which we have passed to the parent component

0

we can pass props for example in nextJS with :

            <Component {...{
              props,
              allCount: count?.lenght,
            }} />
1
  • As it’s currently written, your answer is unclear. Please edit to add additional details that will help others understand how this addresses the question asked. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Feb 22, 2022 at 21:27

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