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I'm looking for the "right" way to start a new project always using another project (like a starter with auth, sessions, users, acls, etc, etc, already developed). Initially I created a new project with a clone and then I changed the remote 'origin' to path. I thought that subtree was the correct method to deal this issue

git subtree add --prefix . template master --squash
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  • I'm confused about what you want to do. Wouldn't a subtree in the root of the repository be the same as a clone of the subtree? Could you please add some details to your question?
    – Chris
    Feb 11 '15 at 12:37
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    Hi Chris, I'm looking for the "right" way to start a new project always using another project (like a starter with auth, sessions, users, acls, etc, etc, already developed). Initially I created a new project with a clone and then I changed the remote 'origin' to path. I thought that subtree was the correct method to deal this issue
    – Mauro
    Feb 11 '15 at 15:11
  • Actually, I think your original approach is more "right" than subtree. If you don't care about the history of the parent repository, you could also use something like git archive to create a zip file without any history and work from that, doing git init again and starting new history.
    – Chris
    Feb 11 '15 at 15:12
  • @chris and what technique would you use to update the project starter on the new repository done with git archive?
    – Mauro
    Feb 11 '15 at 15:33
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    That's why it says "if you don't care about the history". It also means "if you don't care about upstream updates". That option would give you a project that is entirely disconnected from the original.
    – Chris
    Feb 11 '15 at 15:34
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Short answer: No.

Chris provides a reasonable answer in a comment:

If you don't care about the history of the parent repository, you could also use something like git archive to create a zip file without any history and work from that, doing git init again and starting new history.

There is an interesting alternative here abusing git init templates, which are usually for setting up the .git/ dir... Set up a default directory structure on git init

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