241

I am trying to get blue container in the middle of pink one, however seems vertical-align: middle; doesn't do the job in that case.

<div style="display: block; position: absolute; left: 50px; top: 50px;">
    <div style="text-align: left; position: absolute;height: 56px;vertical-align: middle;background-color: pink;">
        <div style="background-color: lightblue;">test</div>
    </div>
</div>

Result:

enter image description here

Expectation:

enter image description here

Please suggest how can I achieve that.

Jsfiddle

7
  • 5
    Is there a reason why are you using position: absolute everywhere?
    – Vucko
    Commented Feb 11, 2015 at 13:08
  • the vertical-align: middle; works with display: inline-block or table layout
    – ctf0
    Commented Feb 11, 2015 at 13:09
  • check this link: vanseodesign.com/css/vertical-centering ;) Commented Feb 11, 2015 at 13:11
  • @Vucko yes - that is prerequisite as this is just simplified version of very complex layout, but absolute position in both top divs is key thing.
    – Vladimirs
    Commented Feb 11, 2015 at 13:19
  • @Vladimirs I can only think of margin-top: calc((56px - 16px) / 2), where 56px - parent height, 16px - element height/font-size - JSFiddle
    – Vucko
    Commented Feb 11, 2015 at 13:32

12 Answers 12

519

First of all note that vertical-align is only applicable to table cells and inline-level elements.

There are couple of ways to achieve vertical alignments which may or may not meet your needs. However I'll show you two methods from my favorites:

1. Using transform and top

.valign {
    position: relative;
    top: 50%;
    transform: translateY(-50%);
    /* vendor prefixes omitted due to brevity */
}
<div style="position: absolute; left: 50px; top: 50px;">
    <div style="text-align: left; position: absolute;height: 56px;background-color: pink;">
        <div class="valign" style="background-color: lightblue;">test</div>
    </div>
</div>

The key point is that a percentage value on top is relative to the height of the containing block; While a percentage value on transforms is relative to the size of the box itself (the bounding box).

If you experience font rendering issues (blurry font), the fix is to add perspective(1px) to the transform declaration so it becomes:

transform: perspective(1px) translateY(-50%);

It's worth noting that CSS transform is supported in IE9+.

2. Using inline-block (pseudo-)elements

In this method, we have two sibling inline-block elements which are aligned vertically at the middle by vertical-align: middle declaration.

One of them has a height of 100% of its parent and the other is our desired element whose we wanted to align it at the middle.

.parent {
    text-align: left;
    position: absolute;
    height: 56px;
    background-color: pink;
    white-space: nowrap;
    font-size: 0; /* remove the gap between inline level elements */
}

.dummy-child { height: 100%; }

.valign {
    font-size: 16px; /* re-set the font-size */
}

.dummy-child, .valign {
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: middle;
}
<div style="position: absolute; left: 50px; top: 50px;">
    <div class="parent">
        <div class="dummy-child"></div>
        <div class="valign" style="background-color: lightblue;">test</div>
    </div>
</div>

Finally, we should use one of the available methods to remove the gap between inline-level elements.

4
  • Thanks for this useful tips. It was working for my project. Good works. Commented Apr 1, 2017 at 9:53
  • For the first method valign element should be display: block
    – Oleg
    Commented Apr 4, 2018 at 6:30
  • 3
    transform: translateY(-50%); Never seen this before, but it works flawlessly. Real life saver. Commented Jan 26, 2020 at 15:03
  • Now we can finally ditch support for IE8, the translateY approach has universal cross-browser support.
    – Jake
    Commented Dec 12, 2020 at 1:32
104

use this :

.Absolute-Center {
    margin: auto;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0; left: 0; bottom: 0; right: 0;
}

refer this link: https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2013/08/absolute-horizontal-vertical-centering-css/

6
  • 4
    How isn't this the main solution? So easy and it works!
    – Mason
    Commented Oct 19, 2017 at 14:39
  • 42
    Keep in mind that height property must be defined (in px, em, etc.) for this to work.
    – Vaidas
    Commented Oct 30, 2017 at 15:25
  • What if I have multiple divs inside the parent? wouldn't all be all placed on top of each other?
    – psykid
    Commented Feb 15, 2018 at 11:27
  • it doesn't work if there's one more child on the same level with "absolute-center"
    – Pascut
    Commented Oct 24, 2018 at 14:57
  • How in 10 years of programming I haven't use this before? =D Thanks
    – Gman
    Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 16:51
29

Use flex blox in your absoutely positioned div to center its content.

See example https://plnkr.co/edit/wJIX2NpbNhO34X68ZyoY?p=preview

.some-absolute-div {    
  display: -webkit-box;
  display: -webkit-flex;
  display: -moz-box;
  display: -moz-flex;
  display: -ms-flexbox;
  display: flex;

  -webkit-box-pack: center;
  -ms-flex-pack: center;
  -webkit-justify-content: center;
  -moz-justify-content: center;
  justify-content: center;

  -webkit-box-align: center;
  -ms-flex-align: center;
  -webkit-align-items: center;
  -moz-align-items: center;
  align-items: center;
}
1
  • 2
    Yes, flexbox is the way to go in 2021! Although make sure to use top: 0; bottom: 0; left:0; right 0; so that first its dimensions become same as that of relatively positioned parent div, and then magic of flexbox kicks in! Commented Jan 6, 2021 at 15:11
24

Center vertically and horizontally:

.parent{
  height: 100%;
  position: absolute;
  width: 100%;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
}
.c{
  position: absolute;
  top: 50%;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
  transform: translateY(-50%);
}
16

For only vertical center

    <div style="text-align: left; position: relative;height: 56px;background-color: pink;">
        <div style="background-color: lightblue;position:absolute;top:50%;    transform: translateY(-50%);">test</div>
    </div>

I always do like this, it's a very short and easy code to center both horizontally and vertically

.center{
    position: absolute;
    top: 50%;
    left: 50%;
    transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
}
<div class="center">Hello Centered World!</div>

4
  • This answer has already been given in the accepted answer.
    – TylerH
    Commented Aug 17, 2020 at 18:59
  • That mean's i can't add any new things here @TaylerH Commented Aug 17, 2020 at 19:06
  • There are plenty of other questions asked each day in html or css for you to try and answer. You should only post an answer if you can add something new to any existing answers. Repetition of content doesn't help anyone.
    – TylerH
    Commented Aug 17, 2020 at 21:39
  • I think this one is the perfect and easiest solution. Commented Feb 17, 2023 at 14:21
8

EDIT: 10/22 as nowdays, display flex or grid is widely implemented i would suggest to use one or the other (display:table/table-cell will still work if you need compatibility with old or exotic browsers , like my TV...)

  • flex

.a{
   position: absolute; 
  left: 50px; 
  top: 50px;
}
.b{
  display:flex;
  align-items:center;
  background-color: pink;
  height: 56px;
}
.c {
  background-color: lightblue;
}
/* move the flex demo aside */
.a.b{left:100px}
You even need less markup
<div class="a">
  <div class="b">
    <div class="c">test</div>
  </div>
</div>


  <div class="a b">
    <div class="c">test</div>
  </div>

  • grid (similar at that point)

.a{
   position: absolute; 
  left: 50px; 
  top: 50px;
}
.b{
  display:grid;
  align-items:center;
  background-color: pink;
  height: 56px;
}
.c {
  background-color: lightblue;
}

/* move the grid  demo aside */
.a.b{left:100px}
You even need less markup
<div class="a">
  <div class="b">
    <div class="c">test</div>
  </div>
</div>


  <div class="a b">
    <div class="c">test</div>
  </div>


Original answer 02/2015 (still efficient everywhere) use with very old or exotic browsers not implementing yet flex or grid

You may use display:table/table-cell;

.a{
   position: absolute; 
  left: 50px; 
  top: 50px;
  display:table;
}
.b{
  text-align: left; 
  display:table-cell;
  height: 56px;
  vertical-align: middle;
  background-color: pink;
}
.c {
  background-color: lightblue;
}
<div class="a">
  <div  class="b">
    <div class="c" >test</div>
  </div>
</div>

2
  • Thanks, your example works perfect, however .b missing position: absolute; which is important to get other things displayed property which I not included to keep code clearer. I know that makes no sense having table-cell absolutely positioned but maybe there is another approach that will allow to retain position: absolute; in both .a and .b classes?
    – Vladimirs
    Commented Feb 11, 2015 at 13:31
  • if a is absolute position, and b (the child) giving it it's size, b is itself in absolute position towards the rest of the content. unless a is suppose to remain unsized i do not understand the purpose of absolute inside absolute ?
    – G-Cyrillus
    Commented Feb 11, 2015 at 14:24
2

Here is simple way using Top object.

eg: If absolute element size is 60px.

.absolute-element { 
    position:absolute; 
    height:60px; 
    top: calc(50% - 60px);
}
1
  • 3
    Using calc is helpful, though this should be top: calc(50% - 30px) for it to actually be centered.
    – brainbag
    Commented Jun 21, 2018 at 9:55
2

An additional simple solution

HTML:

<div id="d1">
    <div id="d2">
        Text
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

#d1{
    position:absolute;
    top:100px;left:100px;
}

#d2{
    border:1px solid black;
    height:50px; width:50px;
    display:table-cell;
    vertical-align:middle;
    text-align:center;  
}
1

You can do it by using display:table; in parent div and display: table-cell; vertical-align: middle; in child div

<div style="display:table;">
      <div style="text-align: left;  height: 56px;  background-color: pink; display: table-cell; vertical-align: middle;">
          <div style="background-color: lightblue; ">test</div>
      </div>
  </div>

1
  • 3
    it's possible that your answer is good but you can improve it very much by adding some description of what your code does...
    – DaFois
    Commented Nov 10, 2018 at 9:27
1

ok thought i would add the following

it centers an element in an absolutely positioned div without adding additional css to the parent, the solution is contained entirely within the element to be centered

#view {
      position          : absolute;
      inset             : 0 0 0 0;
}

.center {
      display           : flex;
      align-items       : center;
      justify-content   : center;
      width             : 100%;
      height            : 100%;
}
<div id=view>

      <div class=center>
            center
      </div>
  
</div>

the width,height 100% is required, align-items centers vertically, justify-content centers horizontally

a post on this thread suggests adding text-align center helps with overflowing text, i haven't tested this

0

in my case,

   centered-vertically {
    height: 60px;
    display: flex;
    justify-content: center;
    -webkit-align-items: center;
  }

worked

0

The much simpler way for to center position absolute items vertically and horizontally to the screen is to use "inset" property.

.center-horizontally-vertically{
      position: absolute;
      inset: 0;
      margin: auto;
}
<div class="center-horizontally-vertically">
 Test
</div>

inset property sets left,right,top and bottom properties to 0 at once.

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