14

Consider the following example:

class Base {}

class Derived : Base {}

class Test1
{
    private List<Derived> m_X;

    public IEnumerable<Base> GetEnumerable()
    {
        return m_X;
    }
}

This compiles just fine, because IEnumerable<T> is covariant in T.

However, if I do exactly the same thing but now with generics:

class Test2<TBase, TDerived> where TDerived : TBase
{
    private List<TDerived> m_X;

    public IEnumerable<TBase> GetEnumerable()
    {
        return m_X;
    }
}

I get the compiler error

Cannot convert expression type 'System.Collection.Generic.List' to return type 'System.Collection.Generic.IEnumerable'

What am I doing wrong here?

  • I suppose there must be an explanation, however, using return m_X.Cast<TBase>(); will solve your case. – AgentFire Feb 11 '15 at 14:51
14

Thing is, in the first case, the Base is known to be a class. In the second case, the type parameter T could be either class or a struct (this is how compiler thinks).

Solve the case by specifying that T is a class, and the error will disappear:

class Test2<TBase, TDerived> where TDerived : class, TBase
{
    private List<TDerived> m_X;

    public IEnumerable<TBase> GetEnumerable()
    {
        return m_X;
    }
}

So, the compiler tries to show us that TDerived could be a struct (since you didn't specify class constraint) and as we already know, covariance and contravariance do not work with structs.

  • 1
    @roryap no, you can't derive a struct, or from a struct. – AgentFire Feb 11 '15 at 14:59
  • 1
    @AgentFire -- So why do you need to be explicit, e.g. where TDerived : class, TBase vs. where TDerived : TBase since TBase is a class.? – rory.ap Feb 11 '15 at 15:00
  • 1
    @roryap because you can declare a type parameter with a struct type, like int: void Foo<T>() where T : int. – AgentFire Feb 11 '15 at 15:03
  • 1
    @roryap Go read the blog post "Minus 100 points" by Eric Gunnerson (a member of the C# compiler team). It explains pretty well why features like you describe may have not made it in to the program. – Scott Chamberlain Feb 11 '15 at 15:23
  • 2
    @roryap What you're talking about is a C# rule. In CIL, this rule doesn't apply (all C# structs derive from a class). When a project is built, it's not C# anymore, it's CIL. But you can still use that code (for example, those generic types) from a C# project. Thus, I'm guessing the C# compiler simply doesn't assume that its own rules are also enforced implicitly by all possible CLI languages. So, instead, it requires an explicit constraint. – Theodoros Chatzigiannakis Feb 11 '15 at 15:26

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