A test question: What is the result of (false - ~0)

Why (false - ~0) is 1? On 32 bit machine ~0 is 11....11 where there are 32 1 bits right? Then false to int conversion is 00....00 also 32 times, right? So we subtract from 32 0 32 1? Does it underflow and we get 1?

  • std::map<std::string, std::vector<unsigned long long>> – Narek Feb 12 '15 at 6:54
  • re @thomasMacleod: your question is wrong - you subtract from 32 0 32 -1. – Alex Brown Feb 12 '15 at 6:59
  • 32 -1is more genius then what is the type of '-' in this instance? :D – Narek Feb 12 '15 at 7:00
  • @AlexBrown, I'm not following you. – ThomasMcLeod Feb 12 '15 at 7:02
  • @ThomasMcLeod - you are correct. I was pointing out that in the light of your (excellent) answer, the original question is wrong: "So we subtract from 32 0 32 1?" isn't what happens. – Alex Brown Feb 12 '15 at 7:04
up vote 9 down vote accepted

0 is int~0 is int and equal -1false gets promoted to int, which results in zero → your expression is calculated as (0 - (-1)) which equals 1.

~0 evaluates to -1 in 2s-complement representation. So 0 - -1 does equal 1.

Edit: To be slightly more precise. The unary ~ operator applied to the literal 0, which is an int, is a bit-wise one's complement operator. The memory representation of 0 then becomes 0xffffffff in 32-bit architectures. However, the result is still type int. Since all popular compilers interpret memory representation of int in two's complement, ~0 evaluates to -1.

  • Holds true as long as we consider it signed. But if we define ~0 as unsigned int still it gives 1 – Atul Feb 12 '15 at 7:07
  • @Atul, in C++, the literal 0 is a signed int. See 2.14.2.2 of the ISO C++ standard. – ThomasMcLeod Feb 12 '15 at 7:13
  • Well even if we do like this: unsigned int zeros = 0; unsigned int ones = 0xFFFFFFFF; unsigned int answer = zeros - ones; still answer hold value 1 – Atul Feb 12 '15 at 7:16
  • @Atul, the operation in your second comment would cause an unsigned int overflow except that the standard says that "Unsigned integers shall obey the laws of arithmetic modulo 2^n where n is the number of bits in the value representation of that particular size of integer." see section 3.9.1.4 So -0xffffffff mod 2^32 does equal 1. But this is not the same expression as the question. There both operands of the subtraction were after promotions just int. – ThomasMcLeod Feb 12 '15 at 7:51
  • I suspect you meant 'The unary ~ operator' not 'The unitary...' – CiaPan Feb 12 '15 at 8:21

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.