Using the DUAL table, how can I get a list of numbers from 1 to 100?

  • Is this homework? If not, the included requirement of "using the DUAL table" seems arbitrary and strange to me. – bart May 17 '10 at 8:45
  • 4
    @bart - using DUAL as a source is a well-known solution to the problem of generating rows, so its inclusion in the question is neither arbitrary nor strange. – APC May 17 '10 at 13:48
  • it would be interesting to know why you want to do this. – Randy May 19 '10 at 22:39
  • "it would be interesting to know why you want to do this" - testing unit conversion logic, or date logic that works for all hours (0-23) or quarter hours (0-95) or a similar exhaustive test. – sf_jeff Dec 28 '17 at 17:54

12 Answers 12

Your question is difficult to understand, but if you want to select the numbers from 1 to 100, then this should do the trick:

Select Rownum r
From dual
Connect By Rownum <= 100

Another interesting solution in ORACLE PL/SQL:

    SELECT LEVEL n
      FROM DUAL
CONNECT BY LEVEL <= 100;
  • 7
    This is plain Oracle SQL. It works fine outside a PL/SQL context. – Vadim K. May 17 '10 at 17:21

Do it the hard way. Use the awesome MODEL clause:

SELECT V
FROM DUAL
MODEL DIMENSION BY (0 R)
      MEASURES (0 V)
      RULES ITERATE (100) (
        V[ITERATION_NUMBER] = ITERATION_NUMBER + 1
      )
ORDER BY 1

Proof: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!4/d41d8/20837

  • 2
    that's easy, why not pattern match... :-) – igr Nov 17 '13 at 16:12
  • 2
    @igr: I challenge you to actually provide that answer :-) – Lukas Eder Nov 17 '13 at 16:45
  • what CV(R) means? Is it like current value? or sth? – zygimantus Jan 27 '17 at 11:09
  • 1
    @zygimantus, yes it's some "weird" syntax for the "current value" of R, meaning the value on the left side of the equation. For details, please refer to the Oracle MODEL white paper – Lukas Eder Jan 27 '17 at 11:22
  • 1
    @lad2025: You're right of course, thanks a lot for the hint! – Lukas Eder Nov 28 '17 at 10:44

Peter's answer is my favourite, too.

If you are looking for more details there is a quite good overview, IMO, here.
Especially interesting is to read the benchmarks.

  • Thanks - your first link was very useful. – Juffy Oct 16 '12 at 3:53

If you want your integers to be bound between two integers (i.e. start with something other than 1), you can use something like this:

with bnd as (select 4 lo, 9 hi from dual)
select (select lo from bnd) - 1 + level r
from dual
connect by level <= (select hi-lo from bnd);

It gives:

4
5
6
7
8

Using GROUP BY CUBE:

SELECT ROWNUM
FROM (SELECT 1 AS c FROM dual GROUP BY CUBE(1,1,1,1,1,1,1) ) sub
WHERE ROWNUM <=100;

Rextester Demo

You could use XMLTABLE:

SELECT rownum
FROM XMLTABLE('1 to 100');

DBFiddle Demo

A variant of Peter's example, that demonstrates a way this could be used to generate all numbers between 0 and 99.

with digits as (
  select mod(rownum,10) as num 
  from   dual 
  connect by rownum <= 10
)
select a.num*10+b.num as num 
from   digits a
       ,digits b
order by num
;

Something like this becomes useful when you are doing batch identifier assignment, and looking for the items that have not yet been assigned.

For example, if you are selling bingo tickets, you may want to assign batches of 100 floor staff (guess how i used to fund raise for sports). As they sell a batch, they are given the next batch in sequence. However, people purchasing the tickets can select to purchase any tickets from the batch. The question may be asked, "what tickets have been sold".

In this case, we only have a partial, random, list of tickets that were returned within the given batch, and require a complete list of all possibilities to determine which we don't have.

with range as (
  select mod(rownum,100) as num 
  from   dual 
  connect by rownum <= 100
),
AllPossible as (
  select a.num*100+b.num as TicketNum
  from   batches a
         ,range b
  order by num
)
select TicketNum as TicketsSold
from   AllPossible
where  AllPossible.Ticket not in (select TicketNum from TicketsReturned)
;

Excuse the use of key words, I changed some variable names from a real world example.

... To demonstrate why something like this would be useful

I created an Oracle function that returns a table of numbers

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION [schema].FN_TABLE_NUMBERS(
    NUMINI INTEGER,
    NUMFIN INTEGER,
    EXPONENCIAL INTEGER DEFAULT 0
) RETURN TBL_NUMBERS
IS
    NUMEROS TBL_NUMBERS;
    INDICE NUMBER;
BEGIN
    NUMEROS := TBL_NUMBERS();

    FOR I IN (
        WITH TABLA AS (SELECT NUMINI, NUMFIN FROM DUAL)
        SELECT NUMINI NUM FROM TABLA UNION ALL
        SELECT 
            (SELECT NUMINI FROM TABLA) + (LEVEL*TO_NUMBER('1E'||TO_CHAR(EXPONENCIAL))) NUM
        FROM DUAL
        CONNECT BY 
            (LEVEL*TO_NUMBER('1E'||TO_CHAR(EXPONENCIAL))) <= (SELECT NUMFIN-NUMINI FROM TABLA)
    ) LOOP
        NUMEROS.EXTEND;
        INDICE := NUMEROS.COUNT; 
        NUMEROS(INDICE):= i.NUM;
    END LOOP;

    RETURN NUMEROS;

EXCEPTION
  WHEN NO_DATA_FOUND THEN
       RETURN NUMEROS;
  WHEN OTHERS THEN
       RETURN NUMEROS;
END;
/

Is necessary create a new data type:

CREATE OR REPLACE TYPE [schema]."TBL_NUMBERS" IS TABLE OF NUMBER;
/

Usage:

SELECT COLUMN_VALUE NUM FROM TABLE([schema].FN_TABLE_NUMBERS(1,10))--integers difference: 1;2;.......;10

And if you need decimals between numbers by exponencial notation:

SELECT COLUMN_VALUE NUM FROM TABLE([schema].FN_TABLE_NUMBERS(1,10,-1));--with 0.1 difference: 1;1.1;1.2;.......;10
SELECT COLUMN_VALUE NUM FROM TABLE([schema].FN_TABLE_NUMBERS(1,10,-2));--with 0.01 difference: 1;1.01;1.02;.......;10

Here is a fun way to generate a number table. It doesn't use the DUAL table, but should the DUAL table ever disappear then this could be a back-up plan.

DECLARE @TotalNumbers INT = 100;

DECLARE @From DATETIME = CONVERT(DATETIME, CONVERT(DATE, GETDATE())),
        @To DATETIME = DATEADD(SECOND, @TotalNumbers - 1, CONVERT(DATETIME, CONVERT(DATE, GETDATE())));

WITH AlmostNumberTable (Hola)
AS (SELECT @From
    UNION ALL
    SELECT DATEADD(SECOND, 1, Hola)
    FROM AlmostNumberTable
    WHERE Hola< @To
   )
SELECT [Number]
FROM
(
    SELECT DATEPART(MINUTE, AlmostNumberTable.Hola) * 60 + DATEPART(SECOND, AlmostNumberTable.Hola) + 1 AS [Number]
    FROM AlmostNumberTable
) AS NumberTable;

It's probably nonsense, but it is a working solution and it was fun to write.

Using Oracle's sub query factory clause: "WITH", you can select numbers from 1 to 100:

WITH t(n) AS (
  SELECT 1 from dual
  UNION ALL
    SELECT n+1 FROM t WHERE n < 100
)
SELECT * FROM t;
SELECT * FROM `DUAL` WHERE id>0 AND id<101

The above query is written in SQL in the database.

  • Which database is this for? – sf_jeff Dec 28 '17 at 17:30

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