-2

I build ord and chr functions and they work just fine. But if I take a file that contains \n, for example:

hello
CHECK THIS HIT
YES

when I ord everything I don't get any new line values. Why is that? I'm writing in Bash.

Here is the code that I am using:

function ord { 
    ordr="`printf "%d\n" \'$1`" 
}

TEXT="`cat $1`"
for (( i=0; i<${#TEXT}; i++ )) 
do 
    ord "${TEXT:$i:1}" 
    echo "$ordr" 
done
  • 2
    Show your ord and chr functions, and how you use them with your file! – gniourf_gniourf Feb 12 '15 at 11:47
  • 1
    That's because you're doing echo $STR, not echo "$STR". – Tom Fenech Feb 12 '15 at 12:14
  • 1
    @gniourf_gniourf yes, I understand that. I deleted my comment to avoid confusion for the OP, but I was just illustrating that, without the quotes, there are issues. – lurker Feb 12 '15 at 12:24
  • 1
    @JhonaBona99 that's very likely because your ord command is badly written and misses lots of quotes all over the place! Please show your code. – gniourf_gniourf Feb 12 '15 at 12:25
  • 2
    Your question was posted 41 minutes ago. 38 minutes ago I asked you to show your code. We have wasted so much time because you don't want to cooperate! Your question has 4 votes to close and 3 downvotes. Don't you understand that the only thing we're asking you to help you is that you show your code??? Edit your post and include your ord function and the way you use it. – gniourf_gniourf Feb 12 '15 at 12:26
4

Your ord function is really weird. Maybe it would be better to write it as:

function ord { 
    printf -v ordr "%d" "'$1"
}

Then you would use it as:

TEXT=$(cat "$1")
for (( i=0; i<${#TEXT}; i++ )); do 
    ord "${TEXT:$i:1}" 
    printf '%s\n' "$ordr"
done

This still leaves two problems: you won't be able to have null bytes and you won't see trailing newlines. For example (I called your script banana and chmod +x banana):

$ ./banana <(printf 'a\0b\n')
97
98

Two problems show here: the null byte is removed from Bash in the TEXT=$(cat "$1") part, as a Bash variable can't contain null bytes. Moreover, this step also trims trailing newlines.

A more robust approach would be to use read:

while IFS= read -r -n 1 -d '' char; do
    ord "$char"
    printf '%s\n' "$ordr"
done < "$1"

With this modification:

$ ./banana <(printf 'a\0b\n')
97
0
98
10

Note that this script will depend on your locale. With my locale (LANG="en_US.UTF-8):

$ ./banana <(printf 'a\0ℂ\n')
97
0
8450
10

whereas:

$ LANG= ./banana <(printf 'a\0ℂ\n')
97
0
226
132
130
10

That's to show you that Bash doesn't read bytes, but characters. So depending on how you want Bash to treat your data, set LANG accordingly.


If your script only does that, it's much simpler to not use an ord function at all:

#!/bin/bash

while IFS= read -r -n 1 -d '' char; do
    printf '%d\n' "'$char"
done < "$1"

It's that simple!

  • Thanks a lot, You've been really helpful ! – JhonaBona99 Feb 12 '15 at 13:18

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.