75

What is the correct way of determining if a process is running, for example FireFox, and stopping it?

I did some looking around and the best way I found was this:

if((get-process "firefox" -ea SilentlyContinue) -eq $Null){ 
        echo "Not Running" 
}

else{ 
    echo "Running"
    Stop-Process -processname "firefox"
 }

Is this the ideal way of doing it? If not, what the correct way of doing so?

7
  • 1
    Yes it does, but I wanted to know if it is the ideal way of doing it? Is their a better way? Are their any disadvantages/advantages of doing this way?
    – user4350786
    Feb 12, 2015 at 15:53
  • 1
    I would think a kinder way to do it would be to get the main hwnd of the firefox window, and send it a WM_CLOSE and/or WM_QUIT. That may be beyond the scope of what powershell is capable of. Feb 12, 2015 at 15:54
  • If you can, could you provide an example?
    – user4350786
    Feb 12, 2015 at 15:55
  • This is relevant: stackoverflow.com/a/14445452/656243 Feb 12, 2015 at 15:56
  • If that answer completely provides a solution, let me know, and I'll mark this one as a dup. Feb 12, 2015 at 15:57

5 Answers 5

134

The way you're doing it you're querying for the process twice. Also Lynn raises a good point about being nice first. I'd probably try something like the following:

# get Firefox process
$firefox = Get-Process firefox -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
if ($firefox) {
  # try gracefully first
  $firefox.CloseMainWindow()
  # kill after five seconds
  Sleep 5
  if (!$firefox.HasExited) {
    $firefox | Stop-Process -Force
  }
}
Remove-Variable firefox
7
  • 7
    Charles - this is EXACTLY what you need. Note Joey's use of the CloseMainWindow() method. Read the docs on that MSDN page. His script tries to ask the app to exit nicely... then attempts a kill. Very nice, Joey: +1. Feb 12, 2015 at 16:02
  • I was just about to say, this is what I was looking for.
    – user4350786
    Feb 12, 2015 at 16:03
  • @CharlesWhitfield Yep, I'd mark this as the answer. And, you already have. Feb 12, 2015 at 16:04
  • Querying for the process twice is faster than waiting a guaranteed 5 seconds every time. But I guess if you're in no rush, you can be "nice". Feb 13, 2015 at 1:56
  • 4
    @campbell.rw: Querying for the process only once avoids a race when the process doesn't exist anymore when you call Stop-Process (which does nothing on an exited process object, but throws an error on a non-existent process name). As for niceness, Firefox can take an awful long time to shut down sometimes, although it has gotten better. They should probably use a timeout that makes sense to them; this was just an example.
    – Joey
    Feb 13, 2015 at 6:22
15

If you don't need to display exact result "running" / "not runnuning", you could simply:

ps notepad -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue | kill -PassThru

If the process was not running, you'll get no results. If it was running, you'll receive get-process output, and the process will be stopped.

1
  • 22
    For the newbie like myself, in full Get-Process notepad -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue | Stop-Process -PassThru
    – Tom Wilson
    Sep 27, 2016 at 15:06
5

@jmp242 - the generic System.Object type does not contain the CloseMainWindow method, but statically casting the System.Diagnostics.Process type when collecting the ProcessList variable works for me. Updated code (from this answer) with this casting (and looping changed to use ForEach-Object) is below.

function Stop-Processes {
    param(
        [parameter(Mandatory=$true)] $processName,
                                     $timeout = 5
    )
    [System.Diagnostics.Process[]]$processList = Get-Process $processName -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue

    ForEach ($Process in $processList) {
        # Try gracefully first
        $Process.CloseMainWindow() | Out-Null
    }

    # Check the 'HasExited' property for each process
    for ($i = 0 ; $i -le $timeout; $i++) {
        $AllHaveExited = $True
        $processList | ForEach-Object {
            If (-NOT $_.HasExited) {
                $AllHaveExited = $False
            }                    
        }
        If ($AllHaveExited -eq $true){
            Return
        }
        Start-Sleep 1
    }
    # If graceful close has failed, loop through 'Stop-Process'
    $processList | ForEach-Object {
        If (Get-Process -ID $_.ID -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue) {
            Stop-Process -Id $_.ID -Force -Verbose
        }
    }
}
1

Thanks @Joey. It's what I am looking for.

I just bring some improvements:

  • to take into account multiple processes
  • to avoid reaching the timeout when all processes have terminated
  • to package the whole in a function

function Stop-Processes {
    param(
        [parameter(Mandatory=$true)] $processName,
                                     $timeout = 5
    )
    $processList = Get-Process $processName -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
    if ($processList) {
        # Try gracefully first
        $processList.CloseMainWindow() | Out-Null

        # Wait until all processes have terminated or until timeout
        for ($i = 0 ; $i -le $timeout; $i ++){
            $AllHaveExited = $True
            $processList | % {
                $process = $_
                If (!$process.HasExited){
                    $AllHaveExited = $False
                }                    
            }
            If ($AllHaveExited){
                Return
            }
            sleep 1
        }
        # Else: kill
        $processList | Stop-Process -Force        
    }
}
1
  • One problem with this is you can end up in a state where you get ERROR: Method invocation failed because [System.Object[]] doesn't contain a method named 'CloseMainWindow'. but the $processList | Stop-Process -Force works. Not sure how to properly handle that error.
    – jmp242
    May 11, 2017 at 12:51
1

To start with process-killing, here python, my 2 cents:

Get-Process python3.9|Stop-Process

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