11

Since the early days of thermal imaging, infrared cameras often use a distinctive palette that runs from black through blue, magenta, orange, yellow to bright white. This palette is often called Iron, or Ironbow.

Here is a typical false color visualization of an image taken with a forward looking infrared camera (source: Wikipedia).

"Termografia kot" by Lcamtuf - a typical false color infrared

"Termografia kot" by Lcamtuf - work by Wikipedia user Lcamtuf. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons "Termografia kot" by Lcamtuf - work by user Lcamtuf. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

On a specialized infrared imagery forum I've found a post from 2005 with a discrete palette that seems to be close to what I am looking for.

A discrete FLIR palette of unknown origin

enter image description here

However as with the rainbow palette it would be nice to have a concise analytical expression that defines the palette.

To those who have used GNUPLOT this palette might look familiar as the default PM3D palette runs black-blue-magenta-orange-yellow.

GNUPLOT PM3D palette

GNUPLOT PM3D palette

This palette has a concise definition

r = Math.round(255*Math.sqrt(x)); 
g = Math.round(255*Math.pow(x,3)); 
b = Math.round(255*(Math.sin(2 * Math.PI * x)>=0?
                   Math.sin(2 * Math.PI * x) : 0 ));

However it is not quite how the other palette looks. A bit too brownish to my taste. Any additional information on the origins or an analytical expression for the palette used in FLIR cameras would help.

I have created a JSFiddle to play with different palettes.

  • 2
    I hope these graphs help :-) There surely is a concise formula, but I haven't yet figured it out. – Bergi May 6 '15 at 3:34
2

These palettes are arbitrary and is mainly used to improve contrast depending of type of image you're having. The values can therefor be pure custom set.

As IR does not capture any colors (as it is outside the color range) the returned luminance value is simply mapped to what creates best contrast, in particular in regards to edges and shapes.

The iron palette has 5-7 key colors which are then interpolated (red can be made fine-tuning the mixing between yellow and magenta). The exact values and positions can be set any way you like, here is an example:

var ctx = document.querySelector("canvas").getContext("2d");
var gr = ctx.createLinearGradient(0, 0, 600, 0);
var keys = ["white", "gold", "#c07", "#20008c", "black"];

// add color stops to gradient:
for(var i = 0, key; key = keys[i]; i++) {
  gr.addColorStop(i / (keys.length-1), key);
}

ctx.fillStyle = gr;
ctx.fillRect(0, 0, 600, 20);
<canvas width=600></canvas>

| improve this answer | |
5

It is unlikely that you'll find a formula for the color palette. So you should use a color array.

Here is FLIR's Iron palette (from here), and its colors in an array:

enter image description here

var iron_palette = ["#00000a","#000014","#00001e","#000025","#00002a","#00002e","#000032","#000036","#00003a","#00003e","#000042","#000046","#00004a","#00004f","#000052","#010055","#010057","#020059","#02005c","#03005e","#040061","#040063","#050065","#060067","#070069","#08006b","#09006e","#0a0070","#0b0073","#0c0074","#0d0075","#0d0076","#0e0077","#100078","#120079","#13007b","#15007c","#17007d","#19007e","#1b0080","#1c0081","#1e0083","#200084","#220085","#240086","#260087","#280089","#2a0089","#2c008a","#2e008b","#30008c","#32008d","#34008e","#36008e","#38008f","#390090","#3b0091","#3c0092","#3e0093","#3f0093","#410094","#420095","#440095","#450096","#470096","#490096","#4a0096","#4c0097","#4e0097","#4f0097","#510097","#520098","#540098","#560098","#580099","#5a0099","#5c0099","#5d009a","#5f009a","#61009b","#63009b","#64009b","#66009b","#68009b","#6a009b","#6c009c","#6d009c","#6f009c","#70009c","#71009d","#73009d","#75009d","#77009d","#78009d","#7a009d","#7c009d","#7e009d","#7f009d","#81009d","#83009d","#84009d","#86009d","#87009d","#89009d","#8a009d","#8b009d","#8d009d","#8f009c","#91009c","#93009c","#95009c","#96009b","#98009b","#99009b","#9b009b","#9c009b","#9d009b","#9f009b","#a0009b","#a2009b","#a3009b","#a4009b","#a6009a","#a7009a","#a8009a","#a90099","#aa0099","#ab0099","#ad0099","#ae0198","#af0198","#b00198","#b00198","#b10197","#b20197","#b30196","#b40296","#b50295","#b60295","#b70395","#b80395","#b90495","#ba0495","#ba0494","#bb0593","#bc0593","#bd0593","#be0692","#bf0692","#bf0692","#c00791","#c00791","#c10890","#c10990","#c20a8f","#c30a8e","#c30b8e","#c40c8d","#c50c8c","#c60d8b","#c60e8a","#c70f89","#c81088","#c91187","#ca1286","#ca1385","#cb1385","#cb1484","#cc1582","#cd1681","#ce1780","#ce187e","#cf187c","#cf197b","#d01a79","#d11b78","#d11c76","#d21c75","#d21d74","#d31e72","#d32071","#d4216f","#d4226e","#d5236b","#d52469","#d62567","#d72665","#d82764","#d82862","#d92a60","#da2b5e","#da2c5c","#db2e5a","#db2f57","#dc2f54","#dd3051","#dd314e","#de324a","#de3347","#df3444","#df3541","#df363d","#e0373a","#e03837","#e03933","#e13a30","#e23b2d","#e23c2a","#e33d26","#e33e23","#e43f20","#e4411d","#e4421c","#e5431b","#e54419","#e54518","#e64616","#e74715","#e74814","#e74913","#e84a12","#e84c10","#e84c0f","#e94d0e","#e94d0d","#ea4e0c","#ea4f0c","#eb500b","#eb510a","#eb520a","#eb5309","#ec5409","#ec5608","#ec5708","#ec5808","#ed5907","#ed5a07","#ed5b06","#ee5c06","#ee5c05","#ee5d05","#ee5e05","#ef5f04","#ef6004","#ef6104","#ef6204","#f06303","#f06403","#f06503","#f16603","#f16603","#f16703","#f16803","#f16902","#f16a02","#f16b02","#f16b02","#f26c01","#f26d01","#f26e01","#f36f01","#f37001","#f37101","#f37201","#f47300","#f47400","#f47500","#f47600","#f47700","#f47800","#f47a00","#f57b00","#f57c00","#f57e00","#f57f00","#f68000","#f68100","#f68200","#f78300","#f78400","#f78500","#f78600","#f88700","#f88800","#f88800","#f88900","#f88a00","#f88b00","#f88c00","#f98d00","#f98d00","#f98e00","#f98f00","#f99000","#f99100","#f99200","#f99300","#fa9400","#fa9500","#fa9600","#fb9800","#fb9900","#fb9a00","#fb9c00","#fc9d00","#fc9f00","#fca000","#fca100","#fda200","#fda300","#fda400","#fda600","#fda700","#fda800","#fdaa00","#fdab00","#fdac00","#fdad00","#fdae00","#feaf00","#feb000","#feb100","#feb200","#feb300","#feb400","#feb500","#feb600","#feb800","#feb900","#feb900","#feba00","#febb00","#febc00","#febd00","#febe00","#fec000","#fec100","#fec200","#fec300","#fec400","#fec500","#fec600","#fec700","#fec800","#fec901","#feca01","#feca01","#fecb01","#fecc02","#fecd02","#fece03","#fecf04","#fecf04","#fed005","#fed106","#fed308","#fed409","#fed50a","#fed60a","#fed70b","#fed80c","#fed90d","#ffda0e","#ffda0e","#ffdb10","#ffdc12","#ffdc14","#ffdd16","#ffde19","#ffde1b","#ffdf1e","#ffe020","#ffe122","#ffe224","#ffe226","#ffe328","#ffe42b","#ffe42e","#ffe531","#ffe635","#ffe638","#ffe73c","#ffe83f","#ffe943","#ffea46","#ffeb49","#ffeb4d","#ffec50","#ffed54","#ffee57","#ffee5b","#ffee5f","#ffef63","#ffef67","#fff06a","#fff06e","#fff172","#fff177","#fff17b","#fff280","#fff285","#fff28a","#fff38e","#fff492","#fff496","#fff49a","#fff59e","#fff5a2","#fff5a6","#fff6aa","#fff6af","#fff7b3","#fff7b6","#fff8ba","#fff8bd","#fff8c1","#fff8c4","#fff9c7","#fff9ca","#fff9cd","#fffad1","#fffad4","#fffbd8","#fffcdb","#fffcdf","#fffde2","#fffde5","#fffde8","#fffeeb","#fffeee","#fffef1","#fffef4","#fffff6"];
| improve this answer | |
  • 433 colors in an array? We surely can do better than that. – Bergi May 6 '15 at 1:58
  • If it is too much, you can reduce the array size. If it is not enough, you can interpolate the missing values. If you have a better solution, I'd love to read it. – minipif May 6 '15 at 2:03
  • Still searching :-) So far, I only found an indexed list of 120 shades here – Bergi May 6 '15 at 2:19
  • I've generated the list myself, using the image showed in the question. I'll post my script if you want. You can set the number of shades you want by resizing the image first (letting your image processing software take care of the interpolation for you), and then run the script on that image. – minipif May 6 '15 at 2:22

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.