59

I have a map where I'd like to perform a call on every data type object member function. I yet know how to do this on any sequence but, is it possible to do it on an associative container?

The closest answer I could find was this: Boost.Bind to access std::map elements in std::for_each. But I cannot use boost in my project so, is there an STL alternative that I'm missing to boost::bind?

If not possible, I thought on creating a temporary sequence for pointers to the data objects and then, call for_each on it, something like this:

class MyClass
{
public:
 void Method() const;
}

std::map<int, MyClass> Map;
//...

std::vector<MyClass*> Vector;
std::transform(Map.begin(), Map.end(), std::back_inserter(Vector), std::mem_fun_ref(&std::map<int, MyClass>::value_type::second));
std::for_each(Vector.begin(), Vector.end(), std::mem_fun(&MyClass::Method));

It looks too obfuscated and I don't really like it. Any suggestions?

11 Answers 11

135

C++11 allows you to do:

for (const auto& kv : myMap) {
    std::cout << kv.first << " has value " << kv.second << std::endl;
}

C++17 allows you to do:

for (const auto& [key, value] : myMap) {
    std::cout << key << " has value " << value << std::endl;
}

using structured binding.

UPDATE:

const auto is safer if you don't want to modify the map.

1
  • I love C++ 17 option but sadly if you use a lambda in the for body those cannot be captured :( Feb 17 at 13:20
64

You can iterate through a std::map object. Each iterator will point to a std::pair<const T,S> where T and S are the same types you specified on your map.

Here this would be:

for (std::map<int, MyClass>::iterator it = Map.begin(); it != Map.end(); ++it)
{
  it->second.Method();
}

If you still want to use std::for_each, pass a function that takes a std::pair<const int, MyClass>& as an argument instead.

Example:

void CallMyMethod(std::pair<const int, MyClass>& pair) // could be a class static method as well
{
  pair.second.Method();
}

And pass it to std::for_each:

std::for_each(Map.begin(), Map.end(), CallMyMethod);
6
  • 1
    Thanks for your answer, but I'd like to avoid creating my own loop. May 17, 2010 at 15:32
  • 2
    @Antonio: Any particular reason for this ? Any template based solution should produce a code which will be at most as efficient, or worse. But unlikely faster. I edited my answer to add a shorter (but equivalent solution).
    – ereOn
    May 17, 2010 at 15:36
  • I just find the use of for_each for this purpose on STL sequences to be cleaner than a for loop (for_each(v.begin(), v.end(), &mem_fun_ref(&MyClass::Method)). So I wandered how to do it on a map. May 17, 2010 at 15:46
  • @Antonio: The question was edited so that you can use std::for_each as well. Give it a try ;)
    – ereOn
    May 17, 2010 at 15:49
  • This doesn't compile because of a small error. When dereferenced, the std::map iterator returns std::pair<const key_type, value_type>, not std::pair<key_type, value_type>. So you need CallMyMethod to take std::pair<const int, MyClass>& as its argument. Oct 11, 2011 at 4:50
15

C++14 brings generic lambdas. Meaning we can use std::for_each very easily:

std::map<int, int> myMap{{1, 2}, {3, 4}, {5, 6}, {7, 8}};

std::for_each(myMap.begin(), myMap.end(), [](const auto &myMapPair) {
    std::cout << "first " << myMapPair.first << " second "
              << myMapPair.second << std::endl;
});

I think std::for_each is sometimes better suited than a simple range based for loop. For example when you only want to loop through a subset of a map.

1
  • clear answer, as this approach has been supported over 4 years from now. Aug 24, 2018 at 13:27
8

How about a plain C++? (example fixed according to the note by @Noah Roberts)

for(std::map<int, MyClass>::iterator itr = Map.begin(), itr_end = Map.end(); itr != itr_end; ++itr) {
  itr->second.Method();
}
21
  • algorithms are much more efficient
    – wheaties
    May 17, 2010 at 15:33
  • 9
    Premature generalization is the root of another kind of evil.
    – kennytm
    May 17, 2010 at 15:56
  • 3
    Arguably, they are harder for the next programmer to understand and maintainable code is worth more than optimized code unless you have identified a bottleneck using a profiling tool. May 17, 2010 at 16:06
  • 1
    @jmucchiello - that's up to taste of course but I would beg to differ with you. Quite the opposite in fact since the algorithms are named after what the loop is supposed to be doing instead of having to decipher that by the steps occurring in the loop. May 17, 2010 at 16:21
  • 4
    ...probably are negligible.) That said, I don't like for_each. It's clumsy most of the time and isn't terribly expressive. Ideally, I prefer the new range-based for-loop in C++0x: for (const map_pair& p : the_map) { the_vec.push_back(p.second); } and for (vec_element v& : the_vec) { v.method(); }. Far simpler to read and quite concise. Next would be faking such functionality, such as with Boost's for each macro. If not that, lambda's can help a bit by localizing algorithms, but I think for_each is sort of a last resort thing.
    – GManNickG
    May 17, 2010 at 16:51
3

It's unfortunate that you don't have Boost however if your STL implementation has the extensions then you can compose mem_fun_ref and select2nd to create a single functor suitable for use with for_each. The code would look something like this:

#include <algorithm>
#include <map>
#include <ext/functional>   // GNU-specific extension for functor classes missing from standard STL

using namespace __gnu_cxx;  // for compose1 and select2nd

class MyClass
{
public:
    void Method() const;
};

std::map<int, MyClass> Map;

int main(void)
{
    std::for_each(Map.begin(), Map.end(), compose1(std::mem_fun_ref(&MyClass::Method), select2nd<std::map<int, MyClass>::value_type>()));
}

Note that if you don't have access to compose1 (or the unary_compose template) and select2nd, they are fairly easy to write.

3
  • If you're a VS user and you know how to access STL extensions, please edit this for cross-platform compatibility. May 17, 2010 at 16:04
  • "Because libstdc++ based its implementation of the STL subsections of the library on the SGI 3.3 implementation, we [GNU] inherited their extensions as well." There is a description of what they do, someone may be able to port them. gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/libstdc++/libstdc++-html-USERS-4.2/… Jan 19, 2017 at 8:39
  • Note, someone has attempted it (untested) here, although it's not well formatted or tested, it did almost compile for me. Seemed to mess up std::pair in the <utility> class with a strange error. YMMV. computer-programming-forum.com/84-vc-stl/4d17c0a678f187f0.htm Jan 19, 2017 at 8:55
2

For fellow programmers who stumble upon this question from google, there is a good way using boost.

Explained here : Is it possible to use boost::foreach with std::map?

Real example for your convenience :

// typedef in include, given here for info : 
typedef std::map<std::string, std::string> Wt::WEnvironment::CookieMap

Wt::WEnvironment::CookieMap cookie_map = environment.cookies();

BOOST_FOREACH( const Wt::WEnvironment::CookieMap::value_type &cookie, cookie_map )
{
    std::cout << "cookie : " << cookie.first << " = " << cookie.second << endl;
}

enjoy.

0

Will it work for you ?

class MyClass;
typedef std::pair<int,MyClass> MyPair;
class MyClass
{
  private:
  void foo() const{};
public:
static void Method(MyPair const& p) 
{
    //......
        p.second.foo();
};
}; 
// ...
std::map<int, MyClass> Map;
//.....
std::for_each(Map.begin(), Map.end(), (&MyClass::Method));
0

Just an example:

template <class key, class value>
class insertIntoVec
{
public:
    insertIntoVec(std::vector<value>& vec_in):m_vec(vec_in)
    {}

    void operator () (const std::pair<key, value>& rhs)  
    {   
        m_vec.push_back(rhs.second);
    }

private:
    std::vector<value>& m_vec;
};

int main()
{
std::map<int, std::string> aMap;
aMap[1] = "test1";
aMap[2] = "test2";
aMap[3] = "test3";
aMap[4] = "test4";

std::vector<std::string> aVec;

aVec.reserve(aMap.size());
std::for_each(aMap.begin(), aMap.end(),
          insertIntoVec<int, std::string>(aVec) 
    );

}

3
  • That's suboptimal. Copying every instance of MyClass and allocating a std::vector for this is not exactly optimization...
    – ereOn
    May 17, 2010 at 15:38
  • The above example is to show how std::for_each can be used to iterate map. There is no question of optimization coming into picture
    – aJ.
    May 17, 2010 at 15:42
  • I guess we can assume the OP will prefer an optimized solution when it exists... no ?
    – ereOn
    May 17, 2010 at 15:47
0

From what I remembered, C++ map can return you an iterator of keys using map.begin(), you can use that iterator to loop over all the keys until it reach map.end(), and get the corresponding value: C++ map

1
  • 2
    No, it cannot! The iterator gives you always a pair (key,value)
    – PierreBdR
    May 17, 2010 at 15:32
0

I wrote this awhile back to do just what you're looking for.

namespace STLHelpers
{
    //
    // iterator helper type for iterating through the *values* of key/value collections
    //

    /////////////////////////////////////////////
    template<typename _traits>
    struct _value_iterator
    {
        explicit _value_iterator(typename _traits::iterator_type _it)
            : it(_it)
        {
        }

        _value_iterator(const _value_iterator &_other)
            : it(_other.it)
        {
        }

        friend bool operator==(const _value_iterator &lhs, const _value_iterator &rhs)
        {
            return lhs.it == rhs.it;
        }

        friend bool operator!=(const _value_iterator &lhs, const _value_iterator &rhs)
        {
            return !(lhs == rhs);
        }

        _value_iterator &operator++()
        {
            ++it;
            return *this;
        }

        _value_iterator operator++(int)
        {
            _value_iterator t(*this);
            ++*this;
            return t;
        }

        typename _traits::value_type &operator->()
        {
            return **this;
        }

        typename _traits::value_type &operator*()
        {
            return it->second;
        }

        typename _traits::iterator_type it;
    };

    template<typename _tyMap>
    struct _map_iterator_traits
    {
        typedef typename _tyMap::iterator iterator_type;
        typedef typename _tyMap::mapped_type value_type;
    };

    template<typename _tyMap>
    struct _const_map_iterator_traits
    {
        typedef typename _tyMap::const_iterator iterator_type;
        typedef const typename _tyMap::mapped_type value_type;
    };
}
0

Here is an example of how you can use for_each for a map.

std::map<int, int> map;

map.insert(std::pair<int, int>(1, 2));
map.insert(std::pair<int, int>(2, 4));
map.insert(std::pair<int, int>(3, 6));

auto f = [](std::pair<int,int> it) {std::cout << it.first + it.second << std::endl; };
std::for_each(map.begin(), map.end(), f);
0

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