19

I'm trying to pipe a string into a program's STDIN without any trailing linefeeds (unless that string itself actually ends in a linefeed). I tried googling around, but I only found people trying to print to the console without a trailing linefeed, in which case Write-Host takes a parameter -NoNewLine. However, to pipe it on to another program, I need Write-Output or similar which doesn't have such a parameter. Now it seems like Write-Output isn't even the problem:

Z:\> (Write-Output "abc").Length
3

But as soon as I pipe it to another program and read the string there, I get an additional linefeed. For instance, I tried this Ruby snippet:

Z:\> Write-Output "abc" | ruby -e "p ARGF.read"
"abc\n"

I checked that the actual string received is abc\n. The same happens in several other languages (at least C#, Java and Python), so I believe it's an issue with PowerShell, not the language doing the reading.

As a further test, I replaced Write-Output itself with another Ruby script:

Z:\> ruby -e "$> << 'abc'"
abcZ:\>

(That is, there is definitely no \n on the script's STDOUT.)

But again, when I pipe it into another script:

Z:\> ruby -e "$> << 'abc'" | ruby -e "p ARGF.read"
"abc\n"

I'm fairly convinced that it's the pipe which adds the linefeed. How do I avoid that? I actually want to be able to control whether the input ends in a linefeed or not (by including it in the input or omitting it).

(For reference, I also tested strings which already contain a trailing linefeed, and in that case the pipe doesn't add another one, so I guess it just ensures a trailing linefeed.)

I originally encountered this in PowerShell v3, but I'm now using v5 and still have the same issue.

7
  • 1
    Yes, this is annoying. It also happens when you read in a file with get-content then write it back out with out-file. Other than piping it through a separate program like you have above (except one that trims the trailing characters), I'm not sure of a way to solve this. – NextInLine Feb 13 '15 at 17:56
  • Have you posted this observed behavior on connect.microsoft.com/PowerShell – user4317867 Oct 2 '15 at 17:42
  • @user4317867 Not yet. I wouldn't consider this a bug, just an annoying feature. – Martin Ender Oct 2 '15 at 18:27
  • Its not a bug just default behavior with the cmdlets that PowerShell uses for data output Out-Default / Out-Host. Lots of people "deal" with it with their own cmdlets or by using custom functions. It's supposed to be a feature in order to prep for more output. I could see this being annoying. I'm sure a more experienced person like Keith Hill might have something to say about this. – Matt Oct 2 '15 at 19:38
  • I wish there could have been more focus on this. I wonder if there is another way. – Matt Oct 8 '15 at 15:42
10
+200

Introduction

Here is my Invoke-RawPipeline function (get latest version from this Gist).

Use it to pipe binary data between processes' Standard Output and Standard Input streams. It can read input stream from file/pipeline and save resulting output stream to file.

It requires PsAsync module to be able to launch and pipe data in multiple processes.

In case of issues use -Verbose switch to see debug output.

Examples

Redirecting to file

  • Batch:
    findstr.exe /C:"Warning" /I C:\Windows\WindowsUpdate.log > C:\WU_Warnings.txt
  • PowerShell:
    Invoke-RawPipeline -Command @{Path = 'findstr.exe' ; Arguments = '/C:"Warning" /I C:\Windows\WindowsUpdate.log'} -OutFile 'C:\WU_Warnings.txt'

Redirecting from file

  • Batch:
    svnadmin load < C:\RepoDumps\MyRepo.dump
  • PowerShell:
    Invoke-RawPipeline -InFile 'C:\RepoDumps\MyRepo.dump' -Command @{Path = 'svnadmin.exe' ; Arguments = 'load'}

Piping strings

  • Batch:
    echo TestString | find /I "test" > C:\SearchResult.log
  • PowerShell:
    'TestString' | Invoke-RawPipeline -Command @{Path = 'find.exe' ; Arguments = '/I "test"'} -OutFile 'C:\SearchResult.log'

Piping between multiple processes

  • Batch:
    ipconfig | findstr /C:"IPv4 Address" /I
  • PowerShell:
    Invoke-RawPipeline -Command @{Path = 'ipconfig'}, @{Path = 'findstr' ; Arguments = '/C:"IPv4 Address" /I'} -RawData

Code:

<#
.Synopsis
    Pipe binary data between processes' Standard Output and Standard Input streams.
    Can read input stream from file and save resulting output stream to file.

.Description
    Pipe binary data between processes' Standard Output and Standard Input streams.
    Can read input stream from file/pipeline and save resulting output stream to file.
    Requires PsAsync module: http://psasync.codeplex.com

.Notes
    Author: beatcracker (https://beatcracker.wordpress.com, https://github.com/beatcracker)
    License: Microsoft Public License (http://opensource.org/licenses/MS-PL)

.Component
    Requires PsAsync module: http://psasync.codeplex.com

.Parameter Command
    An array of hashtables, each containing Command Name, Working Directory and Arguments

.Parameter InFile
    This parameter is optional.

    A string representing path to file, to read input stream from.

.Parameter OutFile
    This parameter is optional.

    A string representing path to file, to save resulting output stream to.

.Parameter Append
    This parameter is optional. Default is false.

    A switch controlling wheither ovewrite or append output file if it already exists. Default is to overwrite.

.Parameter IoTimeout
    This parameter is optional. Default is 0.

    A number of seconds to wait if Input/Output streams are blocked. Default is to wait indefinetely.

.Parameter ProcessTimeout
    This parameter is optional. Default is 0.

    A number of seconds to wait for process to exit after finishing all pipeline operations. Default is to wait indefinetely.
    Details: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ty0d8k56.aspx

.Parameter BufferSize
    This parameter is optional. Default is 4096.

    Size of buffer in bytes for read\write operations. Supports standard Powershell multipliers: KB, MB, GB, TB, and PB.
    Total number of buffers is: Command.Count * 2 + InFile + OutFile.

.Parameter ForceGC
    This parameter is optional.

    A switch, that if specified will force .Net garbage collection.
    Use to immediately release memory on function exit, if large buffer size was used.

.Parameter RawData
    This parameter is optional.

    By default function returns object with StdOut/StdErr streams and process' exit codes.
    If this switch is specified, function will return raw Standard Output stream.

.Example
    Invoke-RawPipeline -Command @{Path = 'findstr.exe' ; Arguments = '/C:"Warning" /I C:\Windows\WindowsUpdate.log'} -OutFile 'C:\WU_Warnings.txt'

    Batch analog: findstr.exe /C:"Warning" /I C:\Windows\WindowsUpdate.log' > C:\WU_Warnings.txt

.Example
    Invoke-RawPipeline -Command @{Path = 'findstr.exe' ; WorkingDirectory = 'C:\Windows' ; Arguments = '/C:"Warning" /I .\WindowsUpdate.log'} -RawData

    Batch analog: cd /D C:\Windows && findstr.exe /C:"Warning" /I .\WindowsUpdate.log

.Example
    'TestString' | Invoke-RawPipeline -Command @{Path = 'find.exe' ; Arguments = '/I "test"'} -OutFile 'C:\SearchResult.log'

    Batch analog: echo TestString | find /I "test" > C:\SearchResult.log

.Example
    Invoke-RawPipeline -Command @{Path = 'ipconfig'}, @{Path = 'findstr' ; Arguments = '/C:"IPv4 Address" /I'} -RawData

    Batch analog: ipconfig | findstr /C:"IPv4 Address" /I

.Example
    Invoke-RawPipeline -InFile 'C:\RepoDumps\Repo.svn' -Command @{Path = 'svnadmin.exe' ; Arguments = 'load'}

    Batch analog: svnadmin load < C:\RepoDumps\MyRepo.dump
#>

function Invoke-RawPipeline
{
    [CmdletBinding()]
    Param
    (
        [Parameter(ValueFromPipeline = $true)]
        [ValidateNotNullOrEmpty()]
        [ValidateScript({
            if($_.psobject.Methods.Match.('ToString'))
            {
                $true
            }
            else
            {
                throw 'Can''t convert pipeline object to string!'
            }
        })]
        $InVariable,

        [Parameter(ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName = $true)]
        [ValidateScript({
            $_ | ForEach-Object {
                $Path = $_.Path
                $WorkingDirectory = $_.WorkingDirectory

                if(!(Get-Command -Name $Path -CommandType Application -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue))
                {
                    throw "Command not found: $Path"
                }

                if($WorkingDirectory)
                {
                    if(!(Test-Path -LiteralPath $WorkingDirectory -PathType Container -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue))
                    {
                        throw "Working directory not found: $WorkingDirectory"
                    }
                }
            }
            $true
        })]
        [ValidateNotNullOrEmpty()]
        [array]$Command,

        [Parameter(ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName = $true)]
        [ValidateScript({
            if(!(Test-Path -LiteralPath $_))
            {
                throw "File not found: $_"
            }
            $true
        })]
        [ValidateNotNullOrEmpty()]
        [string]$InFile,

        [Parameter(ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName = $true)]
        [ValidateScript({
            if(!(Test-Path -LiteralPath (Split-Path $_)))
            {
                throw "Folder not found: $_"
            }
            $true
        })]
        [ValidateNotNullOrEmpty()]
        [string]$OutFile,

        [Parameter(ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName = $true)]
        [switch]$Append,

        [Parameter(ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName = $true)]
        [ValidateRange(0, 2147483)]
        [int]$IoTimeout = 0,

        [Parameter(ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName = $true)]
        [ValidateRange(0, 2147483)]
        [int]$ProcessTimeout = 0,

        [Parameter(ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName = $true)]
        [long]$BufferSize = 4096,

        [Parameter(ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName = $true)]
        [switch]$RawData,

        [Parameter(ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName = $true)]
        [switch]$ForceGC
    )

    Begin
    {

        $Modules = @{PsAsync = 'http://psasync.codeplex.com'}

        'Loading modules:', ($Modules | Format-Table -HideTableHeaders -AutoSize | Out-String) | Write-Verbose

        foreach($module in $Modules.GetEnumerator())
        {
            if(!(Get-Module -Name $module.Key))
            {
                Try
                { 
                    Import-Module -Name $module.Key -ErrorAction Stop
                }
                Catch
                {
                    throw "$($module.Key) module not available. Get it here: $($module.Value)"
                }
            }
        }

        function New-ConsoleProcess
        {
            Param
            (
                [string]$Path,
                [string]$Arguments,
                [string]$WorkingDirectory,
                [switch]$CreateNoWindow = $true,
                [switch]$RedirectStdIn = $true,
                [switch]$RedirectStdOut = $true,
                [switch]$RedirectStdErr = $true
            )

            if(!$WorkingDirectory)
            {
                if(!$script:MyInvocation.MyCommand.Path)
                {
                    $WorkingDirectory = [System.AppDomain]::CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory
                }
                else
                {
                    $WorkingDirectory = Split-Path $script:MyInvocation.MyCommand.Path
                }
            }

            Try
            {
                $ps = New-Object -TypeName System.Diagnostics.Process -ErrorAction Stop
                $ps.StartInfo.Filename = $Path
                $ps.StartInfo.Arguments = $Arguments
                $ps.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = $false
                $ps.StartInfo.RedirectStandardInput = $RedirectStdIn
                $ps.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = $RedirectStdOut
                $ps.StartInfo.RedirectStandardError = $RedirectStdErr
                $ps.StartInfo.CreateNoWindow = $CreateNoWindow
                $ps.StartInfo.WorkingDirectory = $WorkingDirectory
            }
            Catch
            {
                throw $_
            }

            return $ps
        }

        function Invoke-GarbageCollection
        {
            [gc]::Collect()
            [gc]::WaitForPendingFinalizers()
        }

        $CleanUp = {
            $IoWorkers + $StdErrWorkers |
            ForEach-Object {
                $_.Src, $_.Dst |
                ForEach-Object {
                    if(!($_ -is [System.Diagnostics.Process]))
                    {
                        Try
                        {
                            $_.Close()
                        }
                        Catch
                        {
                            Write-Error "Failed to close $_"
                        }
                        $_.Dispose()
                    }

                }
            }
        }

        $PumpData = {
            Param
            (
                [hashtable]$Cfg
            )
            # Fail hard, we don't want stuck threads
            $Private:ErrorActionPreference = 'Stop'

            $Src = $Cfg.Src
            $SrcEndpoint = $Cfg.SrcEndpoint
            $Dst = $Cfg.Dst
            $DstEndpoint = $Cfg.DstEndpoint
            $BufferSize = $Cfg.BufferSize
            $SyncHash = $Cfg.SyncHash
            $RunspaceId = $Cfg.Id
        
            # Setup Input and Output streams
            if($Src -is [System.Diagnostics.Process])
            {
                switch ($SrcEndpoint)
                {
                    'StdOut' {$InStream = $Src.StandardOutput.BaseStream}
                    'StdIn' {$InStream = $Src.StandardInput.BaseStream}
                    'StdErr' {$InStream = $Src.StandardError.BaseStream}
                    default {throw "Not valid source endpoint: $_"}
                }
            }
            else
            {
                $InStream = $Src
            }

            if($Dst -is [System.Diagnostics.Process])
            {
                switch ($DstEndpoint)
                {
                    'StdOut' {$OutStream = $Dst.StandardOutput.BaseStream}
                    'StdIn' {$OutStream = $Dst.StandardInput.BaseStream}
                    'StdErr' {$OutStream = $Dst.StandardError.BaseStream}
                    default {throw "Not valid destination endpoint: $_"}
                }
            }            
            else
            {
                $OutStream = $Dst
            }

            $InStream | Out-String | ForEach-Object {$SyncHash.$RunspaceId.Status += "InStream: $_"}
            $OutStream | Out-String | ForEach-Object {$SyncHash.$RunspaceId.Status += "OutStream: $_"}

            # Main data copy loop
            $Buffer = New-Object -TypeName byte[] $BufferSize
            $BytesThru = 0

            Try
            {
                Do
                {
                    $SyncHash.$RunspaceId.IoStartTime = [DateTime]::UtcNow.Ticks
                    $ReadCount = $InStream.Read($Buffer, 0, $Buffer.Length)
                    $OutStream.Write($Buffer, 0, $ReadCount)
                    $OutStream.Flush()
                    $BytesThru += $ReadCount
                }
                While($readCount -gt 0)
            }
            Catch
            {
                $SyncHash.$RunspaceId.Status += $_
        
            }
            Finally
            {
                $OutStream.Close()
                $InStream.Close()
            }
        }
    }

    Process
    {
        $PsCommand = @()
        if($Command.Length)
        {
            Write-Verbose 'Creating new process objects'
            $i = 0
            foreach($cmd in $Command.GetEnumerator())
            {
                $PsCommand += New-ConsoleProcess @cmd
                $i++
            }
        }

        Write-Verbose 'Building I\O pipeline'
        $PipeLine = @()
        if($InVariable)
        {
                [Byte[]]$InVarBytes = [Text.Encoding]::UTF8.GetBytes($InVariable.ToString())
                $PipeLine += New-Object -TypeName System.IO.MemoryStream -ArgumentList $BufferSize -ErrorAction Stop
                $PipeLine[-1].Write($InVarBytes, 0, $InVarBytes.Length)
                [Void]$PipeLine[-1].Seek(0, 'Begin')
        }
        elseif($InFile)
        {
            $PipeLine += New-Object -TypeName System.IO.FileStream -ArgumentList ($InFile, [IO.FileMode]::Open) -ErrorAction Stop
            if($PsCommand.Length)
            {
                $PsCommand[0].StartInfo.RedirectStandardInput = $true
            }
        }
        else
        {
            if($PsCommand.Length)
            {
                $PsCommand[0].StartInfo.RedirectStandardInput = $false
            }
        }

        $PipeLine += $PsCommand

        if($OutFile)
        {
            if($PsCommand.Length)
            {
                $PsCommand[-1].StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = $true
            }

            if($Append)
            {
                $FileMode = [System.IO.FileMode]::Append
            }
            else
            {
                $FileMode = [System.IO.FileMode]::Create
            }

            $PipeLine += New-Object -TypeName System.IO.FileStream -ArgumentList ($OutFile, $FileMode, [System.IO.FileAccess]::Write) -ErrorAction Stop
        }
        else
        {
            if($PsCommand.Length)
            {
                $PipeLine += New-Object -TypeName System.IO.MemoryStream -ArgumentList $BufferSize -ErrorAction Stop
            }
        }
    
        Write-Verbose 'Creating I\O threads'
        $IoWorkers = @()
        for($i=0 ; $i -lt ($PipeLine.Length-1) ; $i++)
        {
            $SrcEndpoint = $DstEndpoint = $null
            if($PipeLine[$i] -is [System.Diagnostics.Process])
            {
                $SrcEndpoint = 'StdOut'
            }
            if($PipeLine[$i+1] -is [System.Diagnostics.Process])
            {
                $DstEndpoint = 'StdIn'
            }

            $IoWorkers += @{
                Src = $PipeLine[$i]
                SrcEndpoint = $SrcEndpoint
                Dst = $PipeLine[$i+1]
                DstEndpoint = $DstEndpoint
            }
        }
        Write-Verbose "Created $($IoWorkers.Length) I\O worker objects"

        Write-Verbose 'Creating StdErr readers'
        $StdErrWorkers = @()
        for($i=0 ; $i -lt $PsCommand.Length ; $i++)
        {
            $StdErrWorkers += @{
                Src = $PsCommand[$i]
                SrcEndpoint = 'StdErr'
                Dst = New-Object -TypeName System.IO.MemoryStream -ArgumentList $BufferSize -ErrorAction Stop
            }
        }
        Write-Verbose "Created $($StdErrWorkers.Length) StdErr reader objects"

        Write-Verbose 'Starting processes'
        $PsCommand |
            ForEach-Object {
                $ps = $_
                Try
                {
                    [void]$ps.Start()
                }
                Catch
                {
                    Write-Error "Failed to start process: $($ps.StartInfo.FileName)"
                    Write-Verbose "Can't launch process, killing and disposing all"

                    if($PsCommand)
                    {
                        $PsCommand |
                            ForEach-Object {
                                Try{$_.Kill()}Catch{} # Can't do much if kill fails...
                                $_.Dispose()
                            }
                    }

                        Write-Verbose 'Closing and disposing I\O streams'
                    . $CleanUp
                }
                Write-Verbose "Started new process: Name=$($ps.Name), Id=$($ps.Id)"
            }

        $WorkersCount = $IoWorkers.Length + $StdErrWorkers.Length
        Write-Verbose 'Creating sync hashtable'
        $sync = @{}
        for($i=0 ; $i -lt $WorkersCount ; $i++)
        {
            $sync += @{$i = @{IoStartTime = $nul ; Status = $null}}
        }
        $SyncHash = [hashtable]::Synchronized($sync)

        Write-Verbose 'Creating runspace pool'
        $RunspacePool = Get-RunspacePool $WorkersCount

        Write-Verbose 'Loading workers on the runspace pool'
        $AsyncPipelines = @()
        $i = 0
        $IoWorkers + $StdErrWorkers |
        ForEach-Object {
            $Param = @{
                BufferSize = $BufferSize
                Id = $i
                SyncHash = $SyncHash
            } + $_

            $AsyncPipelines += Invoke-Async -RunspacePool $RunspacePool -ScriptBlock $PumpData -Parameters $Param
            $i++

            Write-Verbose 'Started working thread'
            $Param | Format-Table -HideTableHeaders -AutoSize | Out-String | Write-Debug
        }

        Write-Verbose 'Waiting for I\O to complete...'
        if($IoTimeout){Write-Verbose "Timeout is $IoTimeout seconds"}

        Do
        {
            # Check for pipelines with errors
            [array]$FailedPipelines = Receive-AsyncStatus -Pipelines $AsyncPipelines | Where-Object {$_.Completed -and $_.Error}
            if($FailedPipelines)
            {
                "$($FailedPipelines.Length) pipeline(s) failed!",
                ($FailedPipelines | Select-Object -ExpandProperty Error | Format-Table -AutoSize | Out-String) | Write-Debug
            }

            if($IoTimeout)
            {
                # Compare I\O start time of thread with current time
                [array]$LockedReaders = $SyncHash.Keys | Where-Object {[TimeSpan]::FromTicks([DateTime]::UtcNow.Ticks - $SyncHash.$_.IoStartTime).TotalSeconds -gt $IoTimeout}
                if($LockedReaders)
                {
                    # Yikes, someone is stuck
                    "$($LockedReaders.Length) I\O operations reached timeout!" | Write-Verbose
                    $SyncHash.GetEnumerator() | ForEach-Object {"$($_.Key) = $($_.Value.Status)"} | Sort-Object | Out-String | Write-Debug
                    $PsCommand | ForEach-Object {
                        Write-Verbose "Killing process: Name=$($_.Name), Id=$($_.Id)"
                        Try
                        {
                            $_.Kill()
                        }
                        Catch
                        {
                            Write-Error 'Failed to kill process!'
                        }
                    }
                    break
                }
            }
            Start-Sleep 1
        }
        While(Receive-AsyncStatus -Pipelines $AsyncPipelines | Where-Object {!$_.Completed}) # Loop until all pipelines are finished

        Write-Verbose 'Waiting for all pipelines to finish...'
        $IoStats = Receive-AsyncResults -Pipelines $AsyncPipelines
        Write-Verbose 'All pipelines are finished'

        Write-Verbose 'Collecting StdErr for all processes'
        $PipeStdErr = $StdErrWorkers |
            ForEach-Object {
                $Encoding = $_.Src.StartInfo.StandardOutputEncoding
                if(!$Encoding)
                {
                    $Encoding = [System.Text.Encoding]::Default
                }
                @{
                    FileName = $_.Src.StartInfo.FileName
                    StdErr = $Encoding.GetString($_.Dst.ToArray())
                    ExitCode = $_.Src.ExitCode
                }
            } | 
                Select-Object   @{Name = 'FileName' ; Expression = {$_.FileName}},
                                @{Name = 'StdErr' ; Expression = {$_.StdErr}},
                                @{Name = 'ExitCode' ; Expression = {$_.ExitCode}}

        if($IoWorkers[-1].Dst -is [System.IO.MemoryStream])
        {
            Write-Verbose 'Collecting final pipeline output'
                if($IoWorkers[-1].Src -is [System.Diagnostics.Process])
                {
                    $Encoding = $IoWorkers[-1].Src.StartInfo.StandardOutputEncoding
                }
                if(!$Encoding)
                {
                    $Encoding = [System.Text.Encoding]::Default
                }
                $PipeResult = $Encoding.GetString($IoWorkers[-1].Dst.ToArray())
        }


        Write-Verbose 'Closing and disposing I\O streams'
        . $CleanUp

        $PsCommand |
            ForEach-Object {
                $_.Refresh()
                if(!$_.HasExited)
                {
                    Write-Verbose "Process is still active: Name=$($_.Name), Id=$($_.Id)"
                    if(!$ProcessTimeout)
                    {
                        $ProcessTimeout = -1
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        $WaitForExitProcessTimeout = $ProcessTimeout * 1000
                    }
                    Write-Verbose "Waiting for process to exit (Process Timeout = $ProcessTimeout)"
                    if(!$_.WaitForExit($WaitForExitProcessTimeout))
                    {
                        Try
                        {
                            Write-Verbose 'Trying to kill it'
                            $_.Kill()
                        }
                        Catch
                        {
                            Write-Error "Failed to kill process $_"
                        }
                    }
                }
                Write-Verbose "Disposing process object: Name=$($_.StartInfo.FileName)"
                $_.Dispose()
            }

        Write-Verbose 'Disposing runspace pool'
        # http://stackoverflow.com/questions/21454252/how-to-cleanup-resources-in-a-dll-when-powershell-ise-exits-like-new-pssession
        $RunspacePool.Dispose()

        if($ForceGC)
        {
            Write-Verbose 'Forcing garbage collection'
            Invoke-GarbageCollection
        }
    
        if(!$RawData)
        {
            New-Object -TypeName psobject -Property @{Result = $PipeResult ; Status = $PipeStdErr}
        }
        else
        {
            $PipeResult
        }
    }
}
1
  • 1
    As clever as this is, it is largely unnecessary (except as a solution to this particular problem). Anything that can be wholly done in cmd can be invoked from powershell using cmd /c. So invoking legacy commands with byte redirected or piped stdin, stdout or even stderr is easy. Also, having powershell get raw bytes to/from files can be accomplished using Get/Set/Add-Content -AsByteStream (or -Encoding Byte pre V6). Only if you need raw bytes piping between powershell and legacy programs (in or out), without temporary files (this question) then Invoke-RawPipeline is ideal. – Uber Kluger Jul 7 '20 at 19:33
3

Bruteforce approach: feed binary data to process' stdin. I've tested this code on the cat.exe from UnixUtils and it seems to do what you want:

# Text to send
$InputVar = "No Newline, No NewLine,`nNewLine, No NewLine,`nNewLine, No NewLine"

# Buffer & initial size of MemoryStream
$BufferSize = 4096

# Convert text to bytes and write to MemoryStream
[byte[]]$InputBytes = [Text.Encoding]::UTF8.GetBytes($InputVar)
$MemStream = New-Object -TypeName System.IO.MemoryStream -ArgumentList $BufferSize
$MemStream.Write($InputBytes, 0, $InputBytes.Length)
[Void]$MemStream.Seek(0, 'Begin')

# Setup stdin\stdout redirection for our process
$StartInfo = New-Object -TypeName System.Diagnostics.ProcessStartInfo -Property @{
                FileName = 'MyLittle.exe'
                UseShellExecute = $false
                RedirectStandardInput = $true
            }

# Create new process
$Process = New-Object -TypeName System.Diagnostics.Process

# Assign previously created StartInfo properties
$Process.StartInfo = $StartInfo
# Start process
[void]$Process.Start()

# Pipe data
$Buffer = New-Object -TypeName byte[] -ArgumentList $BufferSize
$StdinStream = $Process.StandardInput.BaseStream

try
{
    do
    {
        $ReadCount = $MemStream.Read($Buffer, 0, $Buffer.Length)
        $StdinStream.Write($Buffer, 0, $ReadCount)
        $StdinStream.Flush()
    }
    while($ReadCount -gt 0)
}
catch
{
    throw 'Houston, we have a problem!'           
}
finally
{
    # Close streams
    $StdinStream.Close()
    $MemStream.Close()
}

# Cleanup
'Process', 'StdinStream', 'MemStream' |
    ForEach-Object {
        (Get-Variable $_ -ValueOnly).Dispose()
        Remove-Variable $_ -Force
    }
7
  • Sorry for not getting back to this in so long. This seems to be working (mostly; I'm getting errors on the Remove-Variable, but I've only tested it in PS5), but how would I turn this into a script which can be used as conveniently as a pipe? I guess the closest would be usage like raw-pipe "command1 with arguments" "command2 with other arguments". – Martin Ender Oct 2 '15 at 13:44
  • I'd suggest making this a function and include the function in your Powershell profile, making the function accessible everytime you open the console. See more here – user4317867 Oct 2 '15 at 17:48
  • @MartinBüttner Actually I have WIP version of the "raw piping" function: Invoke-RawPipeline. It requires PsAsync module. You can pipe strings into it and they will be converted to bytes and sent to the target process' stdin: 'NoNewline' | Invoke-RawPipeline -Command @{Path = 'ruby.exe' ; Arguments = 'p ARGF.read'}. Just note, that it's WIP and I haven't looked into it for a long time, so I can't guarantee anything. – beatcracker Oct 2 '15 at 18:52
  • @beatcracker Interesting. How do you detect after the piping whether the string had a newline or not? – Martin Ender Oct 2 '15 at 19:00
  • @MartinBüttner I don't have to, when piping into the function PowerShell doesn't add newlines to strings. Because it's not a real piping, it's just a convenient way to use a string object as a function's parameter. So if you pipe 'No NewLine' - there would be no newline at the end of the string. If you want one, you should pipe "NewLine`n". – beatcracker Oct 2 '15 at 19:08
1

Do it a simple way create a cmd process and execute it

$cmdArgs = @('/c','something.exe','arg1', .. , 'arg2' , $anotherArg , '<', '$somefile.txt' )
&'cmd.exe' $cmdArgs

Worked perfect for piping information into stdin that I wanted,

1
  • Thank you this does work as expected, although I'm afraid it's not exactly convenient. :) – Martin Ender Feb 14 '17 at 10:35
0

To clear up a fundamental misconception in some of the comments: the "powershell commands" in a pipeline are cmdlets and each one runs within the process space of the single powershell. Thus, objects are being passed as is within the same process (on multiple threads) UNLESS you invoke an external command. Then the passed objects are converted to strings by the appropriate formatting cmdlet (if not already string objects). These strings are then converted to a stream of characters with each string having an appended \n. So it is not "the pipeline" adding the \n but the implicit conversion to text for input to the "legacy" command.

The basic problem in the question is that the asker is trying to get object like behaviour (e.g. a string with no trailing \n) on a character (byte) stream input. The standard input stream of a (console) process supplies characters (bytes) one at a time. The input routines collect these individual characters into a single string (typically) terminated when a \n is received. Whether the \n is returned as part of the string is up to the input routine. When the standard input stream is redirected to a file or pipe, the input routines mostly have no knowledge of this. So there is no way to determine the difference between a complete string with no \n and an incomplete string with more characters and the \n still to come.

Possible solutions (to the string delimiting problem, not the powershell added \n problem) would be to have some sort of time-out on the standard input reads. The end of a string could be signaled by no received characters for a certain time. Alternatively, if you had low enough level access to the pipe you could try to have atomic reads and writes. In this way a blocked read would return exactly what was written. Unfortunately, both of these methods have timing problems when running within a multitasking environment. If the delay is long then efficiency falls but if it is too short then it can be fooled by delays caused by process priority scheduling. Scheduling priorities can also interfere with atomic reads and writes if the writing process writes another line before the reading process has read the current one. It would need some sort of synchronizing system.

The only other way to signal that there are no more characters coming on the current line would be to close the pipe (EOF) but this is a once only method so you can only send one string (trailing \n or not). (This is how Ruby knows when the input is finished both in the initial example and in the Invoke-RawPipeline example.) It is possible that this is actually your intention (send only one string with or without trailing \n) in which case you could simply concatenate all the input (retaining or re-inserting any embedded \n) and throw away the last \n.

A possible solution to the powershell added \n problem for multiple strings would be to redefine your encoding of "a string" by terminating each string object with an otherwise invalid character sequence. \0 could be used if you had per character input (no good for C-like line input) otherwise maybe \377 (0xff). This would allow the input routines of your legacy command to "know" when a string ended. The sequence \0\n (or \377\n) would be the "end" of the string and everything before that (including a trailing \n or not, possibly using multiple reads) would be the string. I am assuming that you have some control over the input routines (e.g. you wrote the program) since any off the shelf program reading from standard input would typically be expecting a \n (or EOF) to delimit its input.

-1

I will admit to having zero experience with the ruby -e "puts ARGF.read" command you are using after the pipe, but I think I can prove that the pipe doesn't adding a newline.

# check length of string without newline after pipe 
Write-Output "abc" | %{Write-Host "$_ has a length of: $($_.Length)"  }

#check of string with newline length after pipe
Write-Output "def`n" | %{Write-Host "$($_.Length) is the length of $_" -NoNewline }

#write a string without newline (suppressing newline on Write-Host)
Write-Output 'abc' | %{ Write-Host $_ -NoNewline; }

#write a string with newline (suppressing newline on Write-Host)
Write-Output "def`n" | %{ Write-Host $_ -NoNewline; }

#write a final string without newline (suppressing newline on Write-Host)
Write-Output 'ghi' | %{ Write-Host $_ -NoNewline; }

This gives me an output of:

abc has a length of: 3
4 is the length of def
abcdef
ghi

I think you might want to start looking at the ruby -e "put AGRF.read" command and see if it is adding a newline after each read.

4
  • I have checked this with quite a lot of languages and methods. I think it's working for you because you're piping the string into another PowerShell script (or function?). In that case, it seems that PS just passes on a string object. But as soon as it's piped into a different process, where the pipe's result has to be converted to a byte stream to be read from STDIN, the newline is added. See this comment on the other answer. – Martin Ender Oct 9 '15 at 14:20
  • I tried this with cmd /c echo|set /p=$_ and I saw it written on two lines but I will maintain that the pipe isn't adding a newline based on whether or not the next command is powershell. If I skip the pipe all together and execute two cmd /c echo|set /p=$_ the response is on two lines in powershell - however if I run that exact thing in a batch/command file it is one line. Of course if I open a command prompt and execute this command twice it would most definitely be on two lines. So there appears to be a difference in how the commands are executed within powershell and batch files. – Larry Dukek Oct 9 '15 at 15:04
  • I just noticed that there was a typo in the question. I was intending to use p instead of puts. puts does add a newline, but p simply prints a string representation of whatever you pass it, and since it prints "abc\n" that shows that there is a \n on STDIN even though I never wrote one to the pipe. (Running the exact same command in cmd.exe prints only "abc" as expected.) – Martin Ender Feb 14 '17 at 10:31
  • Because in cmd the pipe passes the bytes output but powershell has to pass objects (one string for a single line output or each element of an array of strings for multiple lines). This conversion of lines to string objects absorbs any \n (or EOF) delimiter so, strictly speaking, even in powershell you aren't writing \n to the pipe. As explained in my answer, the \n is regenerated when the strings are converted to characters for the next legacy command's stdin (as you surmised above). – Uber Kluger Jul 7 '20 at 19:57

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