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I have an assignment to do, but I have no clue where to start. I am not expecting and definitely do not want answers in code. I would like some guidance as in what to do because I feel a bit lost.

Pack and unpack variables into a byte . You need to store 4 different values in a byte. The values are:

NAME       RANGE  BITS   
engine_on  0-1    1

gear_pos   0-4    3 

key_pos    0-2    2 

brake1     0-1    1

brake2     0-1    1

(LSB, Least significant bit )

Write a program bytess.c that takes 5 arguments (less or more should be treated as an error). The arguments should correspond to the values/variables above. Example: bytess 1 2 2 1 1

The above should be treated as: Name Value engine_on 1 gear_pos 2 key_pos 2 brake1 1 brake2 1

Pack these values together in a byte (unsigned char) as an integer and print it out to stdout in hexadecimal form , in this example it should be ‘AB’ corresponding to bits ‘10101011. After this your program should return 0. If your program finds anything wrong (too many/few arguments, faulty input values.. ) your program should print error and return a not zero value.

I know how to check if those are 5 args, but I do not understand what to do next. Ive already read so much information about shifting but my brain can not handle the whole picture. It feels like this should be a really easy example, but I can not find anything on internet that would be similar. How does "AB" become 10101011? Ive just checked String to hex -> 4142. hex to bit -> 1000000101110.

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    You might want to read about bit fields, and maybe unions. And if those are not okay to use, then about the bitwise operators AND &, OR & and NOT ~. – Some programmer dude Feb 13 '15 at 19:55
  • I have read about them but I do not see where I may use them here. – Ship Feb 13 '15 at 19:59
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    Shift operators (<< and/or >>) would be helpful: you can take one of your field's values, and shift it so that it occupies the desired range of bits. The use bitwise or (|) to combine the individual field values into the composite you want. – Scott Hunter Feb 13 '15 at 20:09
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    look into the format "%02x" to print in hex. – ryanpattison Feb 13 '15 at 20:13
  • AB is a hex number, normally written by C programmers as 0xAB. The hex number A has bit pattern 1010, and B is 1011, so together they are 10101011. If you separate the different items in that bit pattern, you have 1 010 10 1 1 in binary, which is 1 2 2 1 1 in decimal. – user3386109 Feb 13 '15 at 20:16
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lets call a byte b, if you set b to 0, you end up with (binary) 0000 0000 (space for readability)

Now we want to pack the different parts into this byte

engine_on  0-1    1
gear_pos   0-4    3 
key_pos    0-2    2 
brake1     0-1    1
brake2     0-1    1

brake2 is simple. We can just set b to the value of brake2 and we will end up with 0000 0000, or 0000 0001 depending on if it is a 0 or a 1.

now we want to set brake 1 to b. We can do this by using a or/equal and the number itself but bitshifted to the right position. We end up with the following:

b |= (brake1 << 1) 

lets explain how I came at this:

brake1 = 0000 0001 //lets assume its a 1 not a 0)
(brake1 << 1) = 0000 0010
b = 0000 0001 //lets assume brake 2 was 1.

to 'add' the value from brake1 to b we have to set each bit if either the bit in b is 1 or if the bit in (brake1 << 1) is one. This is done by a 'bitwise-or', so we end up with:

b = b | (brake1 << 1) // which can also be written as:
b |= (brake1 << 1)

now you can also add the other parts, it also works with more bits at the same time. I hope this has been helpful

  • Thank you, Simon! – Ship Feb 14 '15 at 10:53
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Have you read about bit field?

struct s {
  unsigned char engine_on : 1;
  unsigned char gear_pos : 3;
  unsigned char key_pos : 2;
  unsigned char brake1 : 1;
  unsigned char brake2 : 1;
};
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    Bitfield ordering and packing is implementation dependent. – Antti Haapala Feb 13 '15 at 19:58
  • also bitfield members should be declared as unsigned – BsD Feb 13 '15 at 20:04
  • Ok, I read about it now. I understand that it makes my struct precisely 8 bits. How do I put these values in an integer? – Ship Feb 13 '15 at 20:08
  • you just set the structure members to the values? and then probably memcpy the structure to an integer? – Milind Dumbare Feb 13 '15 at 20:09
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    @Ship It's unlikely that you're supposed to use bit fields in this assignment. All you really need is the left shift operator << and the 'or' operator |. – user3386109 Feb 13 '15 at 20:19
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Here is another way of doing it.

    unsigned int i = 0;

    engine_on = 1;
    gear_pos =2;
    key_pos = 2;
    brake1 = 1;
    brake2 = 1;

    i |= s1.brake2;
    i |= (s1.brake1 << 1);
    i |= (s1.key_pos << 2);
    i |= (s1.gear_pos << 4);
    i |= (s1.engine_on << 7);

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