Is there a standard way to get the types of a function's arguments and pass around these types as a template parameter pack? I know that this is possible in C++ because it has been done before.

I was hoping that with C++14 or the upcoming C++1z, there would be an idiomatic way to implement arg_types<F>... here:

template <typename ...Params>
void some_function(); // Params = const char* and const char*

FILE* fopen(const char* restrict filename, const char* restrict mode);

int main(){
    some_function<arg_types<fopen>...>();
}

Just to be clear, an answer claiming that there is no standard way to do this is not an answer. If there is no answer, I would prefer that the question remain unanswered until the solution is added to C++500 or until the heat death of the universe, whichever happens earlier :)

Edit: A deleted answer noted that I can use PRETTY_FUNCTION to get the names of parameter types. However, I want the actual types. Not the names of those types.

  • 1
    Are you talking about some form of reflection? You can take a look at name mangling: because C++ encodes argument types in symbol, by accessing debug information on binary and knowing function address you can pretty accurately tell, what are the parameter types... – Valeri Atamaniouk Feb 13 '15 at 21:52
  • 1
    1. Using C++ with FILE?!! 2. Better patterns than trying to figure out types at run time – Ed Heal Feb 13 '15 at 21:53
  • 1
    @EdHeal 1. fopen() is just an example; 2. I am NOT using types at runtime. I need them at compile time. – Navin Feb 13 '15 at 22:01
  • 1
    @Yakk Not tied at all. I just want to know parameter types at compile time :) – Navin Feb 13 '15 at 22:02
  • 1
    What are the argument types of void foo(auto a, auto b)? Or struct { void operator()(int) {} void operator()(std::string) {} } foo;? – Casey Feb 13 '15 at 22:10
up vote 10 down vote accepted

This syntax is slightly different.

First, because types are easier to work with than packs, a type that holds a pack. The using type=types; just saves me work in the code that generates a types:

template<class...>struct types{using type=types;};

Here is the workhorse. It takes a signature, and produces a types<?...> bundle containing the arguments for the signature. 3 steps so we can get nice clean C++14esque syntax:

template<class Sig> struct args;
template<class R, class...Args>
struct args<R(Args...)>:types<Args...>{};
template<class Sig> using args_t=typename args<Sig>::type;

Here is a syntax difference. Instead of directly taking Params..., we take a types<Params...>. This is similar to the "tag dispatching" pattern, where we exploit template function type deduction to move arguments into the type list:

template <class...Params>
void some_function(types<Params...>) {
}

My fopen is different, because I don't want to bother #includeing stuff:

void* fopen(const char* filename, const char* mode);

And the syntax is not based off of fopen, but rather the type of fopen. If you have a pointer, you'd need to do decltype(*func_ptr) or somesuch. Or we could augment the top to handle R(*)(Args...) for ease of use:

int main(){
  some_function(args_t<decltype(fopen)>{});
}

live example.

Note that this does not work with overloaded functions, nor does it work with function objects.

In general, this kind of thing is a bad idea, because usually you know how you are interacting with an object.

The above would only be useful if you wanted to take a function (or function pointer) and pop some arguments off some stack somewhere and call it based off the parameters it expected, or something similar.

  • 1
    "pop some arguments off some stack somewhere and call it based off the parameters it expected". Huh, that's exactly what I'm doing! – Navin Feb 13 '15 at 22:08
  • 1
    @Navin even then, I'd almost rather have "invoke this function using these types expecting this return value" -- ie, pass the signature independently. You can double check that the signature works with the invocation target. Overloading rocks, and losing overloading and ADL sucks. Oh, and if you are passing a function pointer into some_function, you could just deduce Args... directly from it. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Feb 13 '15 at 22:13
  • What is the member using type=types for? – template boy Feb 13 '15 at 22:37
  • 1
    @templateboy it makes factory types, like args, slightly shorter and simpler. Every types factory saves ~9 characters by inheriting instead of having a using type= clause. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Feb 14 '15 at 0:44
  • 1
    @templateboy sure, but not if you passed it directly to a class specialized on types<Args...>. For a function argument, the conversion works without it. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Feb 14 '15 at 20:07

Use Boost.FunctionTypes and std::index_sequence. Below is an example which prints the argument types of the function func. You can change the doit static function to do what you want. See it in action here.

template <typename FuncType>
using Arity = boost::function_types::function_arity<FuncType>;

template <typename FuncType>
using ResultType = typename boost::function_types::result_type<FuncType>::type;

template <typename FuncType, size_t ArgIndex>
using ArgType = typename boost::mpl::at_c<boost::function_types::parameter_types<FuncType>, ArgIndex>::type;

void func(int, char, double) {}

template <typename Func, typename IndexSeq>
struct ArgPrintHelper;

template <typename Func, size_t... Inds>
struct ArgPrintHelper<Func, integer_sequence<size_t, Inds...> >
{
  static void doit()
  {
    string typeNames[] = {typeid(ResultType<Arg>).name(), typeid(ArgType<Func, Inds>).name()...};
    for (auto const& name : typeNames)
      cout << name << " ";
    cout << endl;
  }
};

template <typename Func>
void ArgPrinter(Func f)
{
  ArgPrintHelper<Func, make_index_sequence<Arity<Func>::value> >::doit();
}

int main()
{
  ArgPrinter(func);
  return 0;
}

Headers(moved down here to reduce noise in the above code snippet):

#include <boost/function_types/function_type.hpp>
#include <boost/function_types/parameter_types.hpp>
#include <boost/function_types/result_type.hpp>
#include <boost/function_types/function_arity.hpp>

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <type_traits>
#include <typeinfo>
#include <tuple>
#include <utility>
using namespace std;

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