13

How can I optimally (in terms financial cost) empty a DynamoDB table with boto? (as we can do in SQL with a truncate statement.)

boto.dynamodb2.table.delete() or boto.dynamodb2.layer1.DynamoDBConnection.delete_table() deletes the entire table, while boto.dynamodb2.table.delete_item() boto.dynamodb2.table.BatchTable.delete_item() only deletes the specified items.

3
  • 1
    Could you elaborate on what you mean by truncate the table? I'm not sure what you mean by that.
    – garnaat
    Commented Feb 15, 2015 at 13:56
  • @garnaat By truncating I mean emptying a table. Commented Feb 15, 2015 at 14:46
  • 1
    The most efficient way to empty a table is to delete it and re-create it. If it were me, I would have a CloudFormation template to create the table/indexes/etc. and then use CreateStack, DeleteStack to manage its lifecycle.
    – garnaat
    Commented Feb 15, 2015 at 15:15

4 Answers 4

13

While i agree with Johnny Wu that dropping the table and recreating it is much more efficient, there may be cases such as when many GSI's or Tirgger events are associated with a table and you dont want to have to re-associate those. The script below should work to recursively scan the table and use the batch function to delete all items in the table. For massively large tables though, this may not work as it requires all items in the table to be loaded into your computer

import boto3
dynamo = boto3.resource('dynamodb')

def truncateTable(tableName):
    table = dynamo.Table(tableName)
    
    #get the table keys
    tableKeyNames = [key.get("AttributeName") for key in table.key_schema]
    
    """
    NOTE: there are reserved attributes for key names, please see https://docs.aws.amazon.com/amazondynamodb/latest/developerguide/ReservedWords.html
    if a hash or range key is in the reserved word list, you will need to use the ExpressionAttributeNames parameter
    described at https://boto3.amazonaws.com/v1/documentation/api/latest/reference/services/dynamodb.html#DynamoDB.Table.scan
    """

    #Only retrieve the keys for each item in the table (minimize data transfer)
    ProjectionExpression = ", ".join(tableKeyNames)
    
    response = table.scan(ProjectionExpression=ProjectionExpression)
    data = response.get('Items')
    
    while 'LastEvaluatedKey' in response:
        response = table.scan(
            ProjectionExpression=ProjectionExpression, 
            ExclusiveStartKey=response['LastEvaluatedKey'])
        data.extend(response['Items'])

    with table.batch_writer() as batch:
        for each in data:
            batch.delete_item(
                Key={key: each[key] for key in tableKeyNames}
            )
            
truncateTable("YOUR_TABLE_NAME")
11

As Johnny Wu mentioned, deleting a table and re-creating it is more efficient than deleting individual items. You should make sure your code doesn't try to create a new table before it is completely deleted.

def deleteTable(table_name):
    print('deleting table')
    return client.delete_table(TableName=table_name)


def createTable(table_name):
    waiter = client.get_waiter('table_not_exists')
    waiter.wait(TableName=table_name)
    print('creating table')
    table = dynamodb.create_table(
        TableName=table_name,
        KeySchema=[
            {
                'AttributeName': 'YOURATTRIBUTENAME',
                'KeyType': 'HASH'
            }
        ],
        AttributeDefinitions= [
            {
                'AttributeName': 'YOURATTRIBUTENAME',
                'AttributeType': 'S'
            }
        ],
        ProvisionedThroughput={
            'ReadCapacityUnits': 1,
            'WriteCapacityUnits': 1
        },
        StreamSpecification={
            'StreamEnabled': False
        }
    )


def emptyTable(table_name):
    deleteTable(table_name)
    createTable(table_name)
1
  • When I tried, I noticed that the items of the old table were still in the new table. Apparently it seemed that the items were anyway deleted with time and it was not what I needed: I needed to do some tests during deployment and until the items were there I could have not proceeded anyway
    – Matteo
    Commented Apr 11, 2019 at 14:01
3

Deleting a table is much more efficient than deleting items one-by-one. If you are able to control your truncation points, then you can do something similar to rotating tables as suggested in the docs for time series data.

1

This builds on the answer given by Persistent Plants. If the table already exists, you can extract the table definitions and use that to recreate the table.

import boto3

dynamodb = boto3.resource('dynamodb', region_name='us-east-2')

def delete_table_ddb(table_name):
    table = dynamodb.Table(table_name)
    return table.delete()


def create_table_ddb(table_name, key_schema, attribute_definitions,
                     provisioned_throughput, stream_enabled, billing_mode):
    settings = dict(
        TableName=table_name,
        KeySchema=key_schema,
        AttributeDefinitions=attribute_definitions,
        StreamSpecification={'StreamEnabled': stream_enabled},
        BillingMode=billing_mode
    )
    if billing_mode == 'PROVISIONED':
        settings['ProvisionedThroughput'] = provisioned_throughput
    return dynamodb.create_table(**settings)


def truncate_table_ddb(table_name):
    table = dynamodb.Table(table_name)
    key_schema = table.key_schema
    attribute_definitions = table.attribute_definitions
    if table.billing_mode_summary:
        billing_mode = 'PAY_PER_REQUEST'
    else:
        billing_mode = 'PROVISIONED'
    if table.stream_specification:
        stream_enabled = True
    else:
        stream_enabled = False
    capacity = ['ReadCapacityUnits', 'WriteCapacityUnits']
    provisioned_throughput = {k: v for k, v in table.provisioned_throughput.items() if k in capacity}
    delete_table_ddb(table_name)
    table.wait_until_not_exists()
    return create_table_ddb(
        table_name,
        key_schema=key_schema,
        attribute_definitions=attribute_definitions,
        provisioned_throughput=provisioned_throughput,
        stream_enabled=stream_enabled,
        billing_mode=billing_mode
    )

Now call use the function:

table_name = 'test_ddb'
truncate_table_ddb(table_name)

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