43

how do i subtract two different UTC dates in Ruby and then get the difference in minutes?

Thanks

63

If you subtract two Date or DateTime objects, the result is a Rational representing the number of days between them. What you need is:

a = Date.new(2009, 10, 13) - Date.new(2009, 10, 11)
(a * 24 * 60).to_i   # 2880 minutes

or

a = DateTime.new(2009, 10, 13, 12, 0, 0) - DateTime.new(2009, 10, 11, 0, 0, 0)
(a * 24 * 60).to_i   # 3600 minutes
4
  • Not sure if it may have changed between versions (Chubas's answer is common around the Internet), but as of version 1.9.3p364 this is the correct answer.
    – Ephemera
    Jan 16 '13 at 0:30
  • I think my answer has been correct since before 1.9.3 was released :) Jan 16 '13 at 2:34
  • The second part of the answer is not correct. DateTime returns number of seconds, and the accepted answer should be applied in that case - meaning (DateTime.new - DateTime.new)/60
    – Aleks
    Feb 21 '17 at 14:31
  • My answer is correct as of Ruby 2.1. I haven't tried newer versions. Feb 21 '17 at 19:41
36

(time1 - time2) / 60

If the time objects are string, Time.parse(time) them first

2
  • 9
    Depends if the objects in question are Time objects or Date objects. Time#- returns the number of seconds, while Date#- returns the number of days.
    – Tyler Rick
    Apr 19 '13 at 17:47
  • Almost the same but (time1 - time2) / 1.minute might be more readable.
    – lafeber
    Oct 29 '20 at 11:02
24

https://rubygems.org/gems/time_difference - Time Difference gem for Ruby

start_time = Time.new(2013,1)
end_time = Time.new(2014,1)
TimeDifference.between(start_time, end_time).in_minutes
1
  • TimeDifference gem is a great solution
    – utiq
    Nov 2 '15 at 16:53
0

Let's say you have two dates task_signed_in and task_signed_out for a simple @user object. We could do like this:

(@user.task_signed_out.to_datetime - @user.task_signed_in.to_datetime).to_i

This will give you result in days. Multiply by 24 you will get result in hours and again multiply by 60 you will result in minutes and so on.

This is the most up to date solution tested in ruby 2.3.x and above.

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