147

In Swift, is there a clever way of using the higher order methods on Array to return the 5 first objects? The obj-c way of doing it was saving an index, and for-loop through the array incrementing index until it was 5 and returning the new array. Is there a way to do this with filter, map or reduce?

12 Answers 12

358

By far the neatest way to get the first N elements of a Swift array is using prefix(_ maxLength: Int):

let someArray = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]
let first5 = someArray.prefix(5) // 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

This has the benefit of being bounds safe. If the count you pass to prefix is larger than the array count then it just returns the whole array.

NOTE: as pointed out in the comments, Array.prefix actually returns an ArraySlice, not an Array. In most cases this shouldn't make a difference but if you need to assign the result to an Array type or pass it to a method that's expecting an Array param you will need to force the result into an Array type: let first5 = Array(someArray.prefix(5))

  • 29
    +1 such a bad name choice, IMHO. Array has dropFirst and dropLast, so might as well have takeFirst and takeLast. – Mazyod Nov 9 '15 at 5:40
  • 7
    Also if you need first5 to be an array, just write let first5 = Array(someArray.prefix(5)) – ULazdins Dec 11 '15 at 9:56
  • 2
    @mluisbrown Sorry, can't agree with you :) In my project video = video.prefix(5) in Xcode 7.2 results in compile error Cannot assign value of type 'ArraySlice<Video>' to type '[Video]' – ULazdins Dec 11 '15 at 12:29
  • 5
    video = Array(video.prefix(5)) – Bartłomiej Semańczyk Jan 15 '16 at 8:37
  • 2
    @onmyway133 prefix is possibly Swift 2.x only (I don't remember if it was in 1.x), but it certainly exists in any OS that supports Swift 2.x, which is iOS 7 and above. Swift feature availability is determined by Swift releases, not iOS versions. – mluisbrown Apr 15 '16 at 10:43
95

Update: There is now the possibility to use prefix to get the first n elements of an array. Check @mluisbrown's answer for an explanation how to use prefix.

Original Answer: You can do it really easy without filter, map or reduce by just returning a range of your array:

var wholeArray = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
var n = 5

var firstFive = wholeArray[0..<n] // 1,2,3,4,5
  • 71
    If you want just the first n items from a Swift array you can do wholeArray.prefix(n) which has the added benefit of being bounds safe. If n is larger than the array size prefix returns the whole array. – mluisbrown Sep 9 '15 at 23:19
  • 4
    It will crash if the wholeArray doesn't have more elements than n – Jake Lin Mar 3 '16 at 5:57
  • @Crashalot I'm not entirely sure, but I think at the time, where I've written my answer, there was no such thing as prefix. – Christian Wörz Apr 8 '16 at 7:30
  • 1
    Use this code to get first 5 objects... This works perfectly [0,1,2,3,4,5].enumerated().flatMap{ $0 < 5 ? $1 : nil } – Manish Mahajan Apr 10 '18 at 4:27
46

With Swift 5, according to your needs, you may choose one of the 6 following Playground codes in order to solve your problem.


#1. Using subscript(_:) subscript

let array = ["A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G", "H", "I", "J", "K", "L"]
let arraySlice = array[..<5]
//let arraySlice = array[0..<5] // also works
//let arraySlice = array[0...4] // also works
//let arraySlice = array[...4] // also works
let newArray = Array(arraySlice)
print(newArray) // prints: ["A", "B", "C", "D", "E"]

#2. Using prefix(_:) method

Complexity: O(1) if the collection conforms to RandomAccessCollection; otherwise, O(k), where k is the number of elements to select from the beginning of the collection.

let array = ["A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G", "H", "I", "J", "K", "L"]
let arraySlice = array.prefix(5)
let newArray = Array(arraySlice)
print(newArray) // prints: ["A", "B", "C", "D", "E"]

Apple states for prefix(_:):

If the maximum length exceeds the number of elements in the collection, the result contains all the elements in the collection.


#3. Using prefix(upTo:) method

Complexity: O(1)

let array = ["A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G", "H", "I", "J", "K", "L"]
let arraySlice = array.prefix(upTo: 5)
let newArray = Array(arraySlice)
print(newArray) // prints: ["A", "B", "C", "D", "E"]

Apple states for prefix(upTo:):

Using the prefix(upTo:) method is equivalent to using a partial half-open range as the collection's subscript. The subscript notation is preferred over prefix(upTo:).


#4. Using prefix(through:) method

let array = ["A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G", "H", "I", "J", "K", "L"]
let arraySlice = array.prefix(through: 4)
let newArray = Array(arraySlice)
print(newArray) // prints: ["A", "B", "C", "D", "E"]

#5. Using removeSubrange(_:) method

Complexity: O(n), where n is the length of the collection.

var array = ["A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G", "H", "I", "J", "K", "L"]
array.removeSubrange(5...)
print(array) // prints: ["A", "B", "C", "D", "E"]

#6. Using dropLast(_:) method

Complexity: O(1) if the collection conforms to RandomAccessCollection; otherwise, O(k), where k is the number of elements to drop.

let array = ["A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G", "H", "I", "J", "K", "L"]
let distance = array.distance(from: 5, to: array.endIndex)
let arraySlice = array.dropLast(distance)
let newArray = Array(arraySlice)
print(newArray) // prints: ["A", "B", "C", "D", "E"]
  • Should be the accepted answer. – Nik Kov Sep 30 at 17:54
25
let a: [Int] = [0, 0, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4]
let b: [Int] = Array(a.prefix(5))
// result is [0, 0, 1, 1, 2]
16

SWIFT 4

A different solution:

An easy inline solution that wont crash if your array is too short

[0,1,2,3,4,5].enumerated().compactMap{ $0.offset < 3 ? $0.element : nil }

But works fine with this.

[0,1,2,3,4,5].enumerated().compactMap{ $0.offset < 1000 ? $0.element : nil }

Usually this would crash if you did this:

[0,1,2,3,4,5].prefix(upTo: 1000) // THIS CRASHES

[0,1,2,3,4,5].prefix(1000) // THIS DOESNT
  • 3
    for swift3 [0,1,2,3,4,5].enumerated().flatMap{ $0.offset < 1000 ? $0.element : nil } – StevenTsooo Nov 16 '16 at 21:07
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    Thanks! In case you want to update, flatMap is now called compactMap in Swift 4 for array compaction. – manmal Apr 30 '18 at 11:15
14

For getting the first 5 elements of an array, all you need to do is slice the array in question. In Swift, you do it like this: array[0..<5].

To make picking the N first elements of an array a bit more functional and generalizable, you could create an extension method for doing it. For instance:

extension Array {
    func takeElements(var elementCount: Int) -> Array {
        if (elementCount > count) {
            elementCount = count
        }
        return Array(self[0..<elementCount])
    }
}
4

I slightly changed Markus' answer to update it for the latest Swift version, as var inside your method declaration is no longer supported:

extension Array {
    func takeElements(elementCount: Int) -> Array {
        if (elementCount > count) {
            return Array(self[0..<count])
        }
        return Array(self[0..<elementCount])
    }
}
1

Swift 4 with saving array types

extension Array {
    func take(_ elementsCount: Int) -> [Element] {
        let min = Swift.min(elementsCount, count)
        return Array(self[0..<min])
    }
}
1

Update for swift 4:

[0,1,2,3,4,5].enumerated().compactMap{ $0 < 10000 ? $1 : nil }

For swift 3:

[0,1,2,3,4,5].enumerated().flatMap{ $0 < 10000 ? $1 : nil }
  • 1
    Uneffective solution. 1) You create additional sequence of length of an array. 2) You iterate through all the elements. – Alexander Bekert Oct 26 '18 at 14:38
  • 1
    10000? Whats that? – BangOperator Oct 31 '18 at 10:06
1

Plain & Simple

extension Array {
    func first(elementCount: Int) -> Array {
          let min = Swift.min(elementCount, count)
          return Array(self[0..<min])
    }
}
1

For an array of objects you can create an extension from Sequence.

extension Sequence {
    func limit(_ max: Int) -> [Element] {
        return self.enumerated()
            .filter { $0.offset < max }
            .map { $0.element }
    }
}

Usage:

struct Apple {}

let apples: [Apple] = [Apple(), Apple(), Apple()]
let limitTwoApples = apples.limit(2)

// limitTwoApples: [Apple(), Apple()]
0

Swift 4

To get the first N elements of a Swift array you can use prefix(_ maxLength: Int):

Array(largeArray.prefix(5))

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