99

I am working with Entity Framework Code First and MVC 5. When I created my application with Individual User Accounts Authentication I was given an Account controller and along with it all the required classes and code that is needed to get the Indiv User Accounts authentication to work.

Among the code already in place was this:

public class ApplicationDbContext : IdentityDbContext<ApplicationUser>
{
    public ApplicationDbContext() : base("DXContext", throwIfV1Schema: false)
    {

    }

    public static ApplicationDbContext Create()
    {
        return new ApplicationDbContext();
    }
}

But then I went ahead and created my own context using code first, so I now have the following too:

public class DXContext : DbContext
{
    public DXContext() : base("DXContext")
    {

    }

    public DbSet<ApplicationUser> Users { get; set; }
    public DbSet<IdentityRole> Roles { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Artist> Artists { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Paintings> Paintings { get; set; }        
}

Finally I have the following seed method to add some data for me to work with whilst developing:

protected override void Seed(DXContext context)
{
    try
    {

        if (!context.Roles.Any(r => r.Name == "Admin"))
        {
            var store = new RoleStore<IdentityRole>(context);
            var manager = new RoleManager<IdentityRole>(store);
            var role = new IdentityRole { Name = "Admin" };

            manager.Create(role);
        }

        context.SaveChanges();

        if (!context.Users.Any(u => u.UserName == "James"))
        {
            var store = new UserStore<ApplicationUser>(context);
            var manager = new UserManager<ApplicationUser>(store);
            var user = new ApplicationUser { UserName = "James" };

            manager.Create(user, "ChangeAsap1@");
            manager.AddToRole(user.Id, "Admin");
        }

        context.SaveChanges();

        string userId = "";

        userId = context.Users.FirstOrDefault().Id;

        var artists = new List<Artist>
        {
            new Artist { FName = "Salvador", LName = "Dali", ImgURL = "http://i62.tinypic.com/ss8txxn.jpg", UrlFriendly = "salvador-dali", Verified = true, ApplicationUserId = userId },
        };

        artists.ForEach(a => context.Artists.Add(a));
        context.SaveChanges();

        var paintings = new List<Painting>
        {
            new Painting { Title = "The Persistence of Memory", ImgUrl = "http://i62.tinypic.com/xx8tssn.jpg", ArtistId = 1, Verified = true, ApplicationUserId = userId }
        };

        paintings.ForEach(p => context.Paintings.Add(p));
        context.SaveChanges();
    }
    catch (DbEntityValidationException ex)
    {
        foreach (var validationErrors in ex.EntityValidationErrors)
        {
            foreach (var validationError in validationErrors.ValidationErrors)
            {
                Trace.TraceInformation("Property: {0} Error: {1}", validationError.PropertyName, validationError.ErrorMessage);
            }
        }
    }

}

My solution builds fine, but when I try and access a controller that requires access to the database I get the following error:

DX.DOMAIN.Context.IdentityUserLogin: : EntityType 'IdentityUserLogin' has no key defined. Define the key for this EntityType.

DX.DOMAIN.Context.IdentityUserRole: : EntityType 'IdentityUserRole' has no key defined. Define the key for this EntityType.

What am I doing wrong? Is it because I have two contexts?

UPDATE

After reading Augusto's reply, I went with Option 3. Here is what my DXContext class looks like now:

public class DXContext : DbContext
{
    public DXContext() : base("DXContext")
    {
        // remove default initializer
        Database.SetInitializer<DXContext>(null);
        Configuration.LazyLoadingEnabled = false;
        Configuration.ProxyCreationEnabled = false;

    }

    public DbSet<User> Users { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Role> Roles { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Artist> Artists { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Painting> Paintings { get; set; }

    public static DXContext Create()
    {
        return new DXContext();
    }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
        modelBuilder.Entity<User>().ToTable("Users");
        modelBuilder.Entity<Role>().ToTable("Roles");
    }

    public DbQuery<T> Query<T>() where T : class
    {
        return Set<T>().AsNoTracking();
    }
}

I also added a User.cs and a Role.cs class, they look like this:

public class User
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string FName { get; set; }
    public string LName { get; set; }
}

public class Role
{
    public int Id { set; get; }
    public string Name { set; get; }
}

I wasn't sure if I would need a password property on the user, since the default ApplicationUser has that and a bunch of other fields!

Anyways, the above change builds fine, but again I get this error when the application is ran:

Invalid Column name UserId

UserId is an integer property on my Artist.cs

112

The problem is that your ApplicationUser inherits from IdentityUser, which is defined like this:

IdentityUser : IdentityUser<string, IdentityUserLogin, IdentityUserRole, IdentityUserClaim>, IUser
....
public virtual ICollection<TRole> Roles { get; private set; }
public virtual ICollection<TClaim> Claims { get; private set; }
public virtual ICollection<TLogin> Logins { get; private set; }

and their primary keys are mapped in the method OnModelCreating of the class IdentityDbContext:

modelBuilder.Entity<TUserRole>()
            .HasKey(r => new {r.UserId, r.RoleId})
            .ToTable("AspNetUserRoles");

modelBuilder.Entity<TUserLogin>()
            .HasKey(l => new {l.LoginProvider, l.ProviderKey, l.UserId})
            .ToTable("AspNetUserLogins");

and as your DXContext doesn't derive from it, those keys don't get defined.

If you dig into the sources of Microsoft.AspNet.Identity.EntityFramework, you will understand everything.

I came across this situation sometime ago, and I found three possible solutions (maybe there are more):

  1. Use separate DbContexts against two different databases or the same database but different tables.
  2. Merge your DXContext with ApplicationDbContext and use one database.
  3. Use separate DbContexts against the same table and manage their migrations accordingly.

Option 1: See update the the bottom.

Option 2: You will end up with a DbContext like this one:

public class DXContext : IdentityDbContext<User, Role,
    int, UserLogin, UserRole, UserClaim>//: DbContext
{
    public DXContext()
        : base("name=DXContext")
    {
        Database.SetInitializer<DXContext>(null);// Remove default initializer
        Configuration.ProxyCreationEnabled = false;
        Configuration.LazyLoadingEnabled = false;
    }

    public static DXContext Create()
    {
        return new DXContext();
    }

    //Identity and Authorization
    public DbSet<UserLogin> UserLogins { get; set; }
    public DbSet<UserClaim> UserClaims { get; set; }
    public DbSet<UserRole> UserRoles { get; set; }

    // ... your custom DbSets
    public DbSet<RoleOperation> RoleOperations { get; set; }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);

        modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<PluralizingTableNameConvention>();
        modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<OneToManyCascadeDeleteConvention>();

        // Configure Asp Net Identity Tables
        modelBuilder.Entity<User>().ToTable("User");
        modelBuilder.Entity<User>().Property(u => u.PasswordHash).HasMaxLength(500);
        modelBuilder.Entity<User>().Property(u => u.Stamp).HasMaxLength(500);
        modelBuilder.Entity<User>().Property(u => u.PhoneNumber).HasMaxLength(50);

        modelBuilder.Entity<Role>().ToTable("Role");
        modelBuilder.Entity<UserRole>().ToTable("UserRole");
        modelBuilder.Entity<UserLogin>().ToTable("UserLogin");
        modelBuilder.Entity<UserClaim>().ToTable("UserClaim");
        modelBuilder.Entity<UserClaim>().Property(u => u.ClaimType).HasMaxLength(150);
        modelBuilder.Entity<UserClaim>().Property(u => u.ClaimValue).HasMaxLength(500);
    }
}

Option 3: You will have one DbContext equal to the option 2. Let's name it IdentityContext. And you will have another DbContext called DXContext:

public class DXContext : DbContext
{        
    public DXContext()
        : base("name=DXContext") // connection string in the application configuration file.
    {
        Database.SetInitializer<DXContext>(null); // Remove default initializer
        Configuration.LazyLoadingEnabled = false;
        Configuration.ProxyCreationEnabled = false;
    }

    // Domain Model
    public DbSet<User> Users { get; set; }
    // ... other custom DbSets

    public static DXContext Create()
    {
        return new DXContext();
    }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);

        modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<PluralizingTableNameConvention>();

        // IMPORTANT: we are mapping the entity User to the same table as the entity ApplicationUser
        modelBuilder.Entity<User>().ToTable("User"); 
    }

    public DbQuery<T> Query<T>() where T : class
    {
        return Set<T>().AsNoTracking();
    }
}

where User is:

public class User
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    [Required, StringLength(100)]
    public string Name { get; set; }

    [Required, StringLength(128)]
    public string SomeOtherColumn { get; set; }
}

With this solution I'm mapping the entity User to the same table as the entity ApplicationUser.

Then, using Code First Migrations you'll need to generate the migrations for the IdentityContext and THEN for the DXContext, following this great post from Shailendra Chauhan: Code First Migrations with Multiple Data Contexts

You'll have to modify the migration generated for DXContext. Something like this depending on which properties are shared between ApplicationUser and User:

        //CreateTable(
        //    "dbo.User",
        //    c => new
        //        {
        //            Id = c.Int(nullable: false, identity: true),
        //            Name = c.String(nullable: false, maxLength: 100),
        //            SomeOtherColumn = c.String(nullable: false, maxLength: 128),
        //        })
        //    .PrimaryKey(t => t.Id);
        AddColumn("dbo.User", "SomeOtherColumn", c => c.String(nullable: false, maxLength: 128));

and then running the migrations in order (first the Identity migrations) from the global.asax or any other place of your application using this custom class:

public static class DXDatabaseMigrator
{
    public static string ExecuteMigrations()
    {
        return string.Format("Identity migrations: {0}. DX migrations: {1}.", ExecuteIdentityMigrations(),
            ExecuteDXMigrations());
    }

    private static string ExecuteIdentityMigrations()
    {
        IdentityMigrationConfiguration configuration = new IdentityMigrationConfiguration();
        return RunMigrations(configuration);
    }

    private static string ExecuteDXMigrations()
    {
        DXMigrationConfiguration configuration = new DXMigrationConfiguration();
        return RunMigrations(configuration);
    }

    private static string RunMigrations(DbMigrationsConfiguration configuration)
    {
        List<string> pendingMigrations;
        try
        {
            DbMigrator migrator = new DbMigrator(configuration);
            pendingMigrations = migrator.GetPendingMigrations().ToList(); // Just to be able to log which migrations were executed

            if (pendingMigrations.Any())                
                    migrator.Update();     
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            ExceptionManager.LogException(e);
            return e.Message;
        }
        return !pendingMigrations.Any() ? "None" : string.Join(", ", pendingMigrations);
    }
}

This way, my n-tier cross cutting entities don't end up inheriting from AspNetIdentity classes, and therefore I don't have to import this framework in every project where I use them.

Sorry for the extensive post. I hope it could offer some guidance on this. I have already used options 2 and 3 in production environments.

UPDATE: Expand Option 1

For the last two projects I have used the 1st option: having a AspNetUser class that derives from IdentityUser, and a separate custom class called AppUser. In my case, the DbContexts are IdentityContext and DomainContext respectively. And I defined the Id of the AppUser like this:

public class AppUser : TrackableEntity
{
    [Key, DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.None)]
    // This Id is equal to the Id in the AspNetUser table and it's manually set.
    public override int Id { get; set; }

(TrackableEntity is custom abstract base class that I use in the overridden SaveChanges method of my DomainContext context)

I first create the AspNetUser and then the AppUser. The drawback with this approach is that you have ensure that your "CreateUser" functionality is transactional (remember that there will be two DbContexts calling SaveChanges separately). Using TransactionScope didn't work for me for some reason, so I ended up doing something ugly but that works for me:

        IdentityResult identityResult = UserManager.Create(aspNetUser, model.Password);

        if (!identityResult.Succeeded)
            throw new TechnicalException("User creation didn't succeed", new LogObjectException(result));

        AppUser appUser;
        try
        {
            appUser = RegisterInAppUserTable(model, aspNetUser);
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            // Roll back
            UserManager.Delete(aspNetUser);
            throw;
        }

(Please, if somebody comes with a better way of doing this part I appreciate commenting or proposing an edit to this answer)

The benefits are that you don't have to modify the migrations and you can use any crazy inheritance hierarchy over the AppUser without messing with the AspNetUser. And actually I use Automatic Migrations for my IdentityContext (the context that derives from IdentityDbContext):

public sealed class IdentityMigrationConfiguration : DbMigrationsConfiguration<IdentityContext>
{
    public IdentityMigrationConfiguration()
    {
        AutomaticMigrationsEnabled = true;
        AutomaticMigrationDataLossAllowed = false;
    }

    protected override void Seed(IdentityContext context)
    {
    }
}

This approach also has the benefit of avoiding to have your n-tier cross-cutting entities inheriting from AspNetIdentity classes.

  • Thanks @Augusto for the extensive post. Does one have to use Migrations to get Option 3 to work? As far as I know, EF Migrations are for rolling back changes? If I am dropping my database and then re-creating it and seeding it on each new build, do I need do that all that migrations stuff? – J86 Feb 16 '15 at 10:15
  • I didn't try it without using migrations. I don't know if you can accomplish that without using them. Maybe it's possible. I always had to use migrations to retain any custom data that was inserted to the database. – Augusto Barreto Feb 16 '15 at 13:53
  • One thing to point out, if you do use Migrations... you should use the AddOrUpdate(new EntityObject { shoes = green}) also know as "upsert". opposed to just adding to the context, otherwise you will just be creating duplicate/redundant entity context info. – Chef_Code Feb 26 '16 at 0:35
  • I want to work with the 3rd option, but I kinda don't get it. can someone please tell me how exactly the IdentityContext should look like? cuz it can't be exactly like in option 2! Can you help me @AugustoBarreto ? I have made a thread about something similar, maybe you can help me there – Arianit Sep 27 '16 at 16:24
  • What does your 'TrackableEntity' look like? – Ciaran Gallagher Sep 20 '17 at 21:02
218

In my case I had inherited from the IdentityDbContext correctly (with my own custom types and key defined) but had inadvertantly removed the call to the base class's OnModelCreating:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder); // I had removed this
    /// Rest of on model creating here.
}

Which then fixed up my missing indexes from the identity classes and I could then generate migrations and enable migrations appropriately.

  • Had the same problem "removed the line". Your solution worked. :) ty. – display_name Apr 6 '16 at 8:40
  • 2
    This fixed my issue, where I had to override the OnModelCreating method to include a custom Mapping using fluent api for a complex entity relationship. Turns out I forgot to add the line in the answer before declaring my mapping as I am using the same context as Identity. Cheers. – Dan Sep 14 '16 at 11:34
  • It works if there is no 'override void OnModelCreating' but if you override you need to add 'base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);' to the override. Fixed my problem. – Joe Aug 11 '17 at 3:55
13

By Changing The DbContext As Below;

    protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
        modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<OneToManyCascadeDeleteConvention>();
        modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<ManyToManyCascadeDeleteConvention>();
    }

Just adding in OnModelCreating method call to base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder); and it becomes fine. I am using EF6.

Special Thanks To #The Senator

  • This worked for EF Core 3.0 environment thanks! – Waleed Dec 12 '19 at 16:46
12

For those who use ASP.NET Identity 2.1 and have changed the primary key from the default string to either int or Guid, if you're still getting

EntityType 'xxxxUserLogin' has no key defined. Define the key for this EntityType.

EntityType 'xxxxUserRole' has no key defined. Define the key for this EntityType.

you probably just forgot to specify the new key type on IdentityDbContext:

public class AppIdentityDbContext : IdentityDbContext<
    AppUser, AppRole, int, AppUserLogin, AppUserRole, AppUserClaim>
{
    public AppIdentityDbContext()
        : base("MY_CONNECTION_STRING")
    {
    }
    ......
}

If you just have

public class AppIdentityDbContext : IdentityDbContext
{
    ......
}

or even

public class AppIdentityDbContext : IdentityDbContext<AppUser>
{
    ......
}

you will get that 'no key defined' error when you are trying to add migrations or update the database.

  • I am also trying to change the ID to a Int and am having this problem, however I have changed my DbContext to specify the new key type. Is there anywhere else I should check? I thought I was following instructions very carefully. – Kyle May 6 '16 at 0:28
  • 1
    @Kyle: Are you trying to change all entities' ID to int, i.e., AppRole, AppUser, AppUserClaim, AppUserLogin and AppUserRole? If so, you might also need to make sure you have specified the new key type for those classes. Like 'public class AppUserLogin : IdentityUserLogin<int>{ }' – David Liang May 20 '16 at 18:32
  • 1
    This is the official doc about customize the primary keys datatype : docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/security/authentication/… – AdrienTorris Apr 3 '17 at 9:34
  • 1
    Yes, my problem was, I inherited from the general DbContext class instead of IdentityDbContext<AppUser>. Thanks, this helped a lot – yibe Jul 27 '18 at 16:52
1
 protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
        {
            base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);

            //foreach (var relationship in modelBuilder.Model.GetEntityTypes().SelectMany(e => e.GetForeignKeys()))
            //    relationship.DeleteBehavior = DeleteBehavior.Restrict;

            modelBuilder.Entity<User>().ToTable("Users");

            modelBuilder.Entity<IdentityRole<string>>().ToTable("Roles");
            modelBuilder.Entity<IdentityUserToken<string>>().ToTable("UserTokens");
            modelBuilder.Entity<IdentityUserClaim<string>>().ToTable("UserClaims");
            modelBuilder.Entity<IdentityUserLogin<string>>().ToTable("UserLogins");
            modelBuilder.Entity<IdentityRoleClaim<string>>().ToTable("RoleClaims");
            modelBuilder.Entity<IdentityUserRole<string>>().ToTable("UserRoles");

        }
    }
0

My issue was similar - I had a new table i was creating that ahd to tie in to the identity users. After reading the above answers, realized it had to do with IsdentityUser and the inherited properites. I already had Identity set up as its own Context, so to avoid inherently tying the two together, rather than using the related user table as a true EF property, I set up a non-mapped property with the query to get the related entities. (DataManager is set up to retrieve the current context in which OtherEntity exists.)

    [Table("UserOtherEntity")]
        public partial class UserOtherEntity
        {
            public Guid UserOtherEntityId { get; set; }
            [Required]
            [StringLength(128)]
            public string UserId { get; set; }
            [Required]
            public Guid OtherEntityId { get; set; }
            public virtual OtherEntity OtherEntity { get; set; }
        }

    public partial class UserOtherEntity : DataManager
        {
            public static IEnumerable<OtherEntity> GetOtherEntitiesByUserId(string userId)
            {
                return Connect2Context.UserOtherEntities.Where(ue => ue.UserId == userId).Select(ue => ue.OtherEntity);
            }
        }

public partial class ApplicationUser : IdentityUser
    {
        public async Task<ClaimsIdentity> GenerateUserIdentityAsync(UserManager<ApplicationUser> manager)
        {
            // Note the authenticationType must match the one defined in CookieAuthenticationOptions.AuthenticationType
            var userIdentity = await manager.CreateIdentityAsync(this, DefaultAuthenticationTypes.ApplicationCookie);
            // Add custom user claims here
            return userIdentity;
        }

        [NotMapped]
        public IEnumerable<OtherEntity> OtherEntities
        {
            get
            {
                return UserOtherEntities.GetOtherEntitiesByUserId(this.Id);
            }
        }
    }

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