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I am trying to filter/smooth signal obtained from a pressure transducer of sampling frequency 50 kHz. A sample signal is shown below:

enter image description here

I would like to obtain a smooth signal obtained by loess in MATLAB (I am not plotting the same data, values are different).

enter image description here

I calculated the power spectral density using matplotlib's psd() function and the power spectral density is also provided below:

enter image description here

I have tried using the following code and obtained a filtered signal:

import csv
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import scipy as sp
from scipy.signal import butter, lfilter, freqz

def butter_lowpass(cutoff, fs, order=5):
    nyq = 0.5 * fs
    normal_cutoff = cutoff / nyq
    b, a = butter(order, normal_cutoff, btype='low', analog=False)
    return b, a

def butter_lowpass_filter(data, cutoff, fs, order=5):
    b, a = butter_lowpass(cutoff, fs, order=order)
    y = lfilter(b, a, data)
    return y

data = np.loadtxt('data.dat', skiprows=2, delimiter=',', unpack=True).transpose()
time = data[:,0]
pressure = data[:,1]
cutoff = 2000
fs = 50000
pressure_smooth = butter_lowpass_filter(pressure, cutoff, fs)

figure_pressure_trace = plt.figure(figsize=(5.15, 5.15))
figure_pressure_trace.clf()
plot_P_vs_t = plt.subplot(111)
plot_P_vs_t.plot(time, pressure, linewidth=1.0)
plot_P_vs_t.plot(time, pressure_smooth, linewidth=1.0)
plot_P_vs_t.set_ylabel('Pressure (bar)', labelpad=6)
plot_P_vs_t.set_xlabel('Time (ms)', labelpad=6)
plt.show()
plt.close()

The output I get is:

enter image description here

I need more smoothing, I tried changing the cutoff frequency but still satisfactory results can not be obtained. I can't get the same smoothness by MATLAB. I am sure it can be done in Python, but how?

You can find the data here.

Update

I applied lowess smoothing from statsmodels, this also does not provide satisfactory results.

enter image description here

0

2 Answers 2

33

Here are a couple suggestions.

First, try the lowess function from statsmodels with it=0, and tweak the frac argument a bit:

In [328]: from statsmodels.nonparametric.smoothers_lowess import lowess

In [329]: filtered = lowess(pressure, time, is_sorted=True, frac=0.025, it=0)

In [330]: plot(time, pressure, 'r')
Out[330]: [<matplotlib.lines.Line2D at 0x1178d0668>]

In [331]: plot(filtered[:,0], filtered[:,1], 'b')
Out[331]: [<matplotlib.lines.Line2D at 0x1173d4550>]

plot

A second suggestion is to use scipy.signal.filtfilt instead of lfilter to apply the Butterworth filter. filtfilt is the forward-backward filter. It applies the filter twice, once forward and once backward, resulting in zero phase delay.

Here's a modified version of your script. The significant changes are the use of filtfilt instead of lfilter, and the change of cutoff from 3000 to 1500. You might want to experiment with that parameter--higher values result in better tracking of the onset of the pressure increase, but a value that is too high doesn't filter out the 3kHz (roughly) oscillations after the pressure increase.

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from scipy.signal import butter, filtfilt

def butter_lowpass(cutoff, fs, order=5):
    nyq = 0.5 * fs
    normal_cutoff = cutoff / nyq
    b, a = butter(order, normal_cutoff, btype='low', analog=False)
    return b, a

def butter_lowpass_filtfilt(data, cutoff, fs, order=5):
    b, a = butter_lowpass(cutoff, fs, order=order)
    y = filtfilt(b, a, data)
    return y

data = np.loadtxt('data.dat', skiprows=2, delimiter=',', unpack=True).transpose()
time = data[:,0]
pressure = data[:,1]
cutoff = 1500
fs = 50000
pressure_smooth = butter_lowpass_filtfilt(pressure, cutoff, fs)

figure_pressure_trace = plt.figure()
figure_pressure_trace.clf()
plot_P_vs_t = plt.subplot(111)
plot_P_vs_t.plot(time, pressure, 'r', linewidth=1.0)
plot_P_vs_t.plot(time, pressure_smooth, 'b', linewidth=1.0)
plt.show()
plt.close()

Here's the plot of the result. Note the deviation in the filtered signal at the right edge. To handle that, you can experiment with the padtype and padlen parameters of filtfilt, or, if you know you have enough data, you can discard the edges of the filtered signal.

plot of filtfilt result

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  • Exactly what I wanted. But how did you select the frac argument? Is it obtained by trial and error or can it be related to the fluctuations in the signal, because I have to do this for multiple files (>1000). Feb 17, 2015 at 4:05
  • I started with trial and error, but you can make sense of the value after the fact. The large oscillations in the tail of the step response are roughly 3.1kHz. At 50kHz sample rate, that corresponds to about 16 samples per cycle. For the lowess method to eliminate these oscillations, you need a window big enough to include several oscillations. There are 2000 samples in the data, and 2000*0.025 is 50, which includes about 3 oscillations. If the spectrum of the data in all your files is similar, but the number of samples in each file is different, you could try using frac=50.0/num_samples. Feb 17, 2015 at 5:09
0

Here is an example of using a loewess fit. Note that I stripped the header from data.dat.

From the plot it seems that this method performs well on subsets of the data. Fitting all data at once does not give a reasonable result. So, probably this is not the best method here.

import pandas as pd
import matplotlib.pylab as plt
from statsmodels.nonparametric.smoothers_lowess import lowess

data = pd.read_table("data.dat", sep=",", names=["time", "pressure"])
sub_data = data[data.time > 21.5]

result = lowess(sub_data.pressure, sub_data.time.values)
x_smooth = result[:,0]
y_smooth = result[:,1]

tot_result = lowess(data.pressure, data.time.values, frac=0.1)
x_tot_smooth = tot_result[:,0]
y_tot_smooth = tot_result[:,1]

fig, ax = plt.subplots(figsize=(8, 6))
ax.plot(data.time.values, data.pressure, label="raw")
ax.plot(x_tot_smooth, y_tot_smooth, label="lowess 1%", linewidth=3, color="g")
ax.plot(x_smooth, y_smooth, label="lowess", linewidth=3, color="r")
plt.legend()

This is the result I get:

plot

4
  • This looks good, so you split the data and applied smoothing. But I have to do this for multiple files over a thousand files and the pressure rise does not always happen at 21 ms. Feb 16, 2015 at 8:34
  • @NimalNaser, I updated the answer. Without splitting this method does not work and while the results after splitting look fairly nice, I doubt that this is the best method for your problem. Still I wanted to show the results for reference :)
    – cel
    Feb 16, 2015 at 8:39
  • @NimalNaser, and another update. This time I decreased the smoothing area drastically. Still you see that this is far from optimal.
    – cel
    Feb 16, 2015 at 9:35
  • 1
    The gradient is altered. I have to preserve the gradient. Feb 16, 2015 at 11:09

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