54

So far my naive approach is

type stack []int

func (s *stack) Push(v int) {
    *s = append(*s, v)
}

func (s *stack) Pop() int {
    res:=(*s)[len(*s)-1]
    *s=(*s)[:len(*s)-1]
    return res
}

it works - playground, but looks ugly and has too much dereferencing. Can I do better?

4
  • 2
    Better in what aspect?
    – Michael F
    Commented Feb 16, 2015 at 12:44
  • @Michael Foukarakis Better in meaning - not such ugly, more readable, and avoiding reference on slice, which is reference type itself. Commented Feb 16, 2015 at 12:52
  • github.com/karalabe/cookiejar has a quite performant implementation.
    – 0x434D53
    Commented Feb 19, 2015 at 3:14
  • github.com/fern4lvarez/piladb provides a complete stack implementation using linked lists Commented Dec 21, 2016 at 15:17

8 Answers 8

92

It's a matter of style and personal taste, your code is fine (apart from not being thread safe and panicking if you pop from an empty stack). To simplify it a bit you can work with value methods and return the stack itself, it's slightly more elegant to some tastes. i.e.

type stack []int

func (s stack) Push(v int) stack {
    return append(s, v)
}

func (s stack) Pop() (stack, int) {
    // FIXME: What do we do if the stack is empty, though?

    l := len(s)
    return  s[:l-1], s[l-1]
}


func main(){
    s := make(stack,0)
    s = s.Push(1)
    s = s.Push(2)
    s = s.Push(3)

    s, p := s.Pop()
    fmt.Println(p)

}

Another approach is to wrap it in a struct, so you can also easily add a mutex to avoid race conditions, etc. something like:

type stack struct {
     lock sync.Mutex // you don't have to do this if you don't want thread safety
     s []int
}

func NewStack() *stack {
    return &stack {sync.Mutex{}, make([]int,0), }
}

func (s *stack) Push(v int) {
    s.lock.Lock()
    defer s.lock.Unlock()

    s.s = append(s.s, v)
}

func (s *stack) Pop() (int, error) {
    s.lock.Lock()
    defer s.lock.Unlock()


    l := len(s.s)
    if l == 0 {
        return 0, errors.New("Empty Stack")
    }

    res := s.s[l-1]
    s.s = s.s[:l-1]
    return res, nil
}


func main(){
    s := NewStack()
    s.Push(1)
    s.Push(2)
    s.Push(3)
    fmt.Println(s.Pop())
    fmt.Println(s.Pop())
    fmt.Println(s.Pop())
}
14
  • 3
    nitpick, you don't actually need to pass a new sync.Mutex, &stack {s: []int{}} is enough.
    – OneOfOne
    Commented Feb 18, 2015 at 14:27
  • 1
    @alediaferia you can add a sync.Locker member to the stack, and lock/unlock it. By default put a dummy lock there, and add a constructor that creates the pool with a real mutex or rwmutex. Commented Jun 15, 2015 at 14:51
  • 2
    The way this is implemented, if I'm not mistaken, there's a new memory assignment every time a push or a pop is done. Can this be implemented, instead, with a pointer to the head, and a pre-allocated capacity?
    – David
    Commented Jul 5, 2018 at 17:40
  • 2
    @david no, the underlying array grows exponentially so you'll get very few allocations in practice. You can optimize the initial capacity but that's rarely an issue. Commented Jul 5, 2018 at 20:40
  • 3
    @user3125693 no, append is smarter than that. It grows the array capacity exponentially, so most of the appends do not resize anything, thus it's amortized O(1) Commented Nov 14, 2018 at 13:07
21

Here is a LIFO implementation using linked data structure

package stack

import "sync"

type element struct {
    data interface{}
    next *element
}

type stack struct {
    lock *sync.Mutex
    head *element
    Size int
}

func (stk *stack) Push(data interface{}) {
    stk.lock.Lock()

    element := new(element)
    element.data = data
    temp := stk.head
    element.next = temp
    stk.head = element
    stk.Size++

    stk.lock.Unlock()
}

func (stk *stack) Pop() interface{} {
    if stk.head == nil {
        return nil
    }
    stk.lock.Lock()
    r := stk.head.data
    stk.head = stk.head.next
    stk.Size--

    stk.lock.Unlock()

    return r
}

func New() *stack {
    stk := new(stack)
    stk.lock = &sync.Mutex{}

    return stk
}
1
  • Adding functionality to display stack items........ func (stk *stack) Display() { tmp := stk.head for tmp != nil { fmt.Println(tmp.data) tmp = tmp.next } } Commented Jan 2, 2022 at 17:33
6

I believe it would be nice if we could take advantage of Go's standard libs instead of creating self-defined data structure like @guy_fawkes did. Although he did a great job, it's not a standard way to use singly linked list.

To get list's tail in O(1) time complexity, I would use doubly linked list. I trade space for time.

I also take @Not_a_Golfer's advice to add a lock to the stack.

import (
    "container/list"
    "sync"
)

type Stack struct {
    dll   *list.List
    mutex sync.Mutex
}

func NewStack() *Stack {
    return &Stack{dll: list.New()}
}

func (s *Stack) Push(x interface{}) {
    s.mutex.Lock()
    defer s.mutex.Unlock()

    s.dll.PushBack(x)
}

func (s *Stack) Pop() interface{} {
    s.mutex.Lock()
    defer s.mutex.Unlock()

    if s.dll.Len() == 0 {
        return nil
    }
    tail := s.dll.Back()
    val := tail.Value
    s.dll.Remove(tail)
    return val
}

Click this playground to preview the result.

5

With the introduction of generics you can now create some pretty elegant implementations, here's one using a more functional style:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

type stack[T any] struct {
    Push func(T)
    Pop func() T
    Length func() int
}

func Stack[T any]() stack[T] {
    slice := make([]T, 0)
    return stack[T]{
        Push: func(i T) {
            slice = append(slice, i)
        },
        Pop: func() T {
            res := slice[len(slice)-1]
            slice = slice[:len(slice)-1]
            return res
        },
        Length: func() int {
            return len(slice)
        },
    }
}


func main() {
    stack := Stack[string]()
    stack.Push("this")
    fmt.Println(stack.Length())
    fmt.Println(stack.Pop())
}
3
  • What is an advantage of this functional style, does it has an advantage vs the usual definition of a method, or do you think it is just more elegant?
    – nkcode
    Commented May 25, 2022 at 17:01
  • 1
    some benefits IMO being A) no chance for getting bit by zero value initialization of structs, B) It's a more pure form of an abstract data type (the user doesn't even get direct access to the Stack() slice, only Push() and Pop() can manipulate data), C) you get to use the proper name for the constructor func (i.e. Stack() returns a stack{} vs NewStack() returns a Stack{}). Commented May 28, 2022 at 15:23
  • yes, but you can do that by implementing a push and pop interface, returning the interface in NewStack()
    – nkcode
    Commented Jul 19, 2022 at 10:56
2

Use https://github.com/emirpasic/gods

package main

import lls "github.com/emirpasic/gods/stacks/linkedliststack"

func main() {
    stack := lls.New()  // empty
    stack.Push(1)       // 1
    stack.Push(2)       // 1, 2
    stack.Values()      // 2, 1 (LIFO order)
    _, _ = stack.Peek() // 2,true
    _, _ = stack.Pop()  // 2, true
    _, _ = stack.Pop()  // 1, true
    _, _ = stack.Pop()  // nil, false (nothing to pop)
    stack.Push(1)       // 1
    stack.Clear()       // empty
    stack.Empty()       // true
    stack.Size()        // 0
}
1
  • This is not a good example
    – Saurabh
    Commented May 7, 2022 at 4:25
0

Can I do better?

With generics released, we can generalize your implementation like this:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "log"
)

// Generic stack
// One should implement better constraints
type stack[V any] []V

func (s *stack[V]) Push(v V) int {
    *s = append(*s, v)
    return len(*s)
}
func (s *stack[V]) Last() V {
    l := len(*s)

    // Upto the developer to handle an empty stack
    if l == 0 {
        log.Fatal("Empty Stack")
    }

    last := (*s)[l-1]
    return last
}

func (s *stack[V]) Pop() V {
    removed := (*s).Last()
    *s = (*s)[:len(*s)-1]

    return removed
}

// Pointer not needed because read-only operation
func (s stack[V]) Values() {
    for i := len(s) - 1; i >= 0; i-- {
        fmt.Printf("%v ", s[i])
    }
}

Playground

0

One more addition to concurrency safe stack implementation in Golang.

Supporting operations like:

  1. Push(value interface{})
  2. Peek() interface{}
  3. Pop()
  4. Size() int
  5. Reverse()
  6. Display()
package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "sync"
)

type StackMethods interface {
    Push(value interface{})
    Peek() interface{}
    Pop()
    Size() int
    Reverse()
    Display()
}

type Stack struct {
    node *Node
    size int
    lock sync.Mutex
}

type Node struct {
    value interface{}
    next  *Node
}

func (s *Stack) Size() int {
    return s.size
}
func (s *Stack) Push(value interface{}) {
    s.lock.Lock()
    defer s.lock.Unlock()
    s.node = &Node{
        value: value,
        next:  s.node,
    }
    s.size++
}

func (s *Stack) Peek() interface{} {
    if s.size > 0 {
        fmt.Println("Element: ", s.node.value)
        return s.node.value
    } else {
        fmt.Println("No elements in stack to display.")
    }
    return nil
}

func (s *Stack) Pop() {
    s.lock.Lock()
    defer s.lock.Unlock()
    if s.size > 0 {
        fmt.Printf("Removing element %v from stack.\n", s.node.value)
        s.node = s.node.next
        s.size--
    } else {
        fmt.Println("No elements in stack to remove.")
    }
}

func (s *Stack) Reverse() {
    s.lock.Lock()
    defer s.lock.Unlock()
    if s.node != nil {
        var next, prev *Node
        curr := s.node

        for curr != nil {
            next = curr.next
            curr.next = prev
            prev = curr
            curr = next
        }
        s.node = prev
        return
    }
}

func (s *Stack) Display() {
    if s.node != nil {
        ptr := s.node
        fmt.Println("Displaying elements")
        for ptr != nil {
            fmt.Print(ptr.value, "\n")
            fmt.Println("____")
            ptr = ptr.next
        }
        return
    }
    fmt.Println("Stack is empty.")
}

func main() {
    //Creating interface object.
    var stackObject StackMethods
    //Assigning Stack struct object to interface object.
    stackObject = new(Stack)

    stackObject.Push("A")
    fmt.Println("Size:", stackObject.Size())
    stackObject.Peek()
    stackObject.Peek()
    fmt.Println("Size:", stackObject.Size())
    stackObject.Push("B")
    stackObject.Push("C")
    fmt.Println("Size:", stackObject.Size())
    stackObject.Peek()
    fmt.Println("Size:", stackObject.Size())
    fmt.Println("Before Reversing:")
    stackObject.Display()
    fmt.Println("After Reversing:")
    stackObject.Reverse()
    stackObject.Display()
}

0

My Stack implementation:

The advantages are:

  1. Use "slice" no need to retune memory is automatically tuned!
  2. It is safe for "multithreading"
  3. Not easy to corrupt information
  4. Generics are used so it is flexible in use with different types of data.

The disadvantages are:

  1. You can't remove, use an random item
stack := utility.NewStack[string]()
stack.Push("1")
stack2 := utility.NewStack[[]int]()
stack2.Push([]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5})
element, _ := stack2.Peek()
// Using Generics to define Type in Stake to Use Structs, too.
type Stack[T any] struct {
    lock sync.Mutex // Mutex for Thread safety
    S    []T // Slice
}

func NewStack[T any]() *Stack[T] {
    return &Stack[T]{lock: sync.Mutex{}, S: []T{}}
}

func (stack *Stack[T]) Push(element T) {
    stack.lock.Lock()
    defer stack.lock.Unlock()
    stack.S = append(stack.S, element)
}

func (stack *Stack[T]) Pop() (T, error) {
    stack.lock.Lock()
    defer stack.lock.Unlock()
    l := len(stack.S)
    if l == 0 {
        var empty T
        return empty, errors.New("empty Stack")
    }
    element := stack.S[l-1]
    stack.S = stack.S[:l-1]
    return element, nil
}

func (stack *Stack[T]) Peek() (T, error) {
    stack.lock.Lock()
    defer stack.lock.Unlock()
    l := len(stack.S)
    if l == 0 {
        var empty T
        return empty, errors.New("empty Stack")
    }
    return stack.S[l-1], nil
}
2
  • 1
    Thanks for sharing your stack implementation. In its current state, the answer does not clearly indicate the pros and cons of your implementation. Your answer would be more useful with this information and some information on how you arrived at this implementation.
    – hbd
    Commented Aug 8, 2022 at 19:23
  • Thank you for your advice, i added some comments. Commented Aug 16, 2022 at 9:51

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