7

I am willing to force my classes to define a constant named COMMAND. If php would allow overriding constants from interfaces in would look like

class RequestInterface
{
    const COMMAND = "no-command-specified";
}

class LoginRequest implements RequestInterface
{
    const COMMAND = "loginuser";
    public $username;
    public $password;
}

$request = new LoginRequest();
$request->username = "user";
$request->password = "blah";

Obviously this does not work. I am looking for a clean way to make my requests define COMMAND cosntant.

I've been considering the following options:

  • Interface defines a getCommand method and my request classes need to implement it and return the command name as a string. But it is too much code per request
  • Replace the interface with an abstract class. It looks weird because abstract class is usually expected to define at least one method
  • Interface becomes abstract class and defines a protected variable $command. It also has a getter method that returns $this->command;. Children override protected property $command. I do not like the way of mixing public VARIABLES (that are supposed to be variable) with a protected VARIABLE that is not really supposed to be modifiable and therefore not suppose to be a variable in the first place.

    class LoginRequest extends BaseRequest
    {
         protected $command = "loginuser";
         public $username;
         public $password;
    }
    

What would be the cleanest way of achieving this?

  • What do you mean by "too much code per request"? You want to avoid having to define the interface's method inside implementing classes? I would probably just use that option. In the past, I have also used the second (abstract class) option, but I agree it is unusual without any defined method. – Michael Berkowski Feb 16 '15 at 13:59
  • How about a class with only constants, where you reference to in your current class? This way you always have a constant central – Drifter Feb 16 '15 at 14:07
  • @MichaelBerkowski I wanted my Request objects to be the simplest possible containers of data. I appreciate this approach seems to be the cleanest but defining a method seems to me like a bit too much of code – Vladimir Hraban Feb 16 '15 at 14:19
  • @user3790680 This approach centralises the data but does not enforce it in any way – Vladimir Hraban Feb 16 '15 at 14:20
  • I know, but I thought enforcing was part of to know sure you got the right data. Indeed it won't help for enforcing. – Drifter Feb 16 '15 at 14:25
6

Personally, my choice would be:

interface RequestInterface
{
    /**
     * @returns string
     */
    public function getCommand();
}

class LoginRequest implements RequestInterface
{
    public function getCommand() {
        return "loginuser";
    }
   ...
}

You can always check that a string is returned with is_string() later. There's nothing to stop someone setting COMMAND to a number anyway.

  • If you want to use it as a serialised object look at the JsonSerializable interface. You can then define what data is returned. – DanielM Feb 16 '15 at 17:14

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